Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
266 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As some of you may already know, I've been in Arizona on an extended vacation this winter and have had the opportunity to do some riding... I met one of our members (ob1jeeper) out here and we have been on several rides together. Shortly after our first ride, I blew the left fork seal on my FZR. Steve was gracious enough to not only offer the use of his garage for the repairs, but also helped with the job. Many thanks go out to Steve. He's a great guy and we had a lot of fun.

During the repair, it became obvious that we were going to need a spring compression tool. I didn't bother to check with the bike shop to see how much one would cost, I just assumed it was going to be expensive. And, to be honest, I didn't want to pay for a tool that I was only likely going to use one time. So, being an engineer by trade, Steve came up with this contraption. It worked great, and was very simple to make...











Here was our method of holding the bike up to get the job done. It saved a lot of work as we didn't have to remove the fork tubes from the triple tree.... (These are USD cartridge type forks)





And, here we are in the middle of the job. Yes, we did both fork tubes while we had it up....



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
That is very clever, thanks for sharing the information with us.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
250 Posts
I am not sure what you are showing in those pictures. Nut sure what you connected the all thread rod to and how you got the main plug back in.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
266 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am not sure what you are showing in those pictures. Nut sure what you connected the all thread rod to and how you got the main plug back in.


Sorry, I should have taken a photo of the tool before we attached it to the dampener rod. Basically the threaded rod has a nut welded to the end of it. You thread the nut/threaded rod onto the dampener rod, then thread the nut at the top down to apply pressure to the spring. Once you have the groove exposed there is a retaining ring that you snap out. (It was hard to see in the second photo because it was around the back of the shaft...) Then it's simply a matter of backing off the top nut, and removing the tool... Then the spring will come right out.... The last photo is of reassembly which is pretty much the same thing...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
230 Posts
I did something similar when I replaced a set of rear progressive springs on my 1100 wing, but on the front all u can do is act like superman and compress the spring by hand since the top cap holds the spring instead of a snap ring. lol
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top