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I've replaced the carb and engine bolts with Stainless steel allan bolts (dry). Can anyone let me know ifthere are any problems with this? Stainless in aluminium? :baffled: Should I use any particular thread lock compounds? Copper slip? Avoid any?

The engine is ready to mount and now is a good time to rectify anything that could go horribly wrong or that I might regret.

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The situation with stainless threads into aluminum is they tend to gall....seize, however you want to say it. Not at first but with time. As things heat and cool and expand and contract the aluminum likes to seize to the threads of the stainless fasteners.

This is not a big deal on small fasteners.....such as on the carbs and all that as the break force is small.

What you can do is simply coat the threads of the fasteners with some type of automotive anti-seize compound. Works fine. Does not hurt your torque values either if installed in a location that torque is required. I generally coat the threads with oil before using a torque wrench anyway........

It will be the larger fasteners that tend to seize....or one like where the exhaust mounts to the motor.....that is a good one to act up.

Kit
 

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Go to www.boltdepot.com for any and all chrome bolts you need. There is no minimum on an order. Dissimular metals will corrode together.
 

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Randakk's main objection seems to be the over-tightening of the fasteners. Yes, there is always the risk of corrosion, but I believe the plated ones tarnish & corrode way sooner than the stainless ones.

Personally, my experience has been greatly favorable toward the stainless steel goods. But I also learned early on about over-torquing any fastener, regardless of its makeup. The pros far outweighed the cons.

It makes sense to me to use an anti-seize compound on the smoother running machinery, like Goldwings, but I sure wouldn't use it on the "shakers" like Harley D., BSA,& Norton!!!

I have personally seen them disassemble themselves on a short trip to the grocery store, regardless of fastener material!!! The best compromise I found for these problem children, was to use a dab of RTV Black silicon sealer on the threads. It seemed to keep stuff together, and not interfere with intentional disassembly. I'm sure others have their favorite solutions, too.
 

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all dissimilar metals will corrode.... I have put the allen wrench stainless on the transmission cover, and they are far EASIER to remove than the phillips machine bolts that cam OEM (and also corrode)
 

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About this dissimilar metals will corrode stuff. Yes they will corrode.....but it takes years. A lot of years.

Both in the mechanics fields and the Plumbing trades we are taught since day one and our first boring class that we should never use dissimilar metals as they will corrode, set up electroylosis (see I did not pay attention is class cannot even spell this one!!) Anyway that thing electroy...whatever is where unlike metals set up a small electrical current between the materials. Causes the metals to corrode faster than if the same types.

In the real world....I have seen this rarely. It takes a lot of time and years for this to occur. Actually stainless steel fasteners are pretty good.

On a motorcycle I have seen iron bolts un-chromed corrode into the cylinder to the point they snap off and it takes two hours to drill them out.

In the plumbing field....copper connected to galvanized piping will corrode. But it will take it 25 years to do so. By then everything else is corroded too.

I dismiss the electrolosis theory as just that ....a theory. Some thing to be talked about and taught in books and in class rooms. In real life......it is not a big thing.

Kit


Tip.....when securing allen head fasteners use a standard set of allen wrenches. Not the T handle.......T handle is fine to take down with. but to build back use a regular L shape allen....when you are securing a fastener hold the wrench out on the end with one finger under the end of it.....and secure the fastener.....when you see the allen wrench just start to flex.....stop......it is like a built in torque wrench.....never exceed that and you will not strip a thread and have to drill it out and all that mess. Kit
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
About this dissimilar metals will corrode stuff. Yes they will corrode.....but it takes years. A lot of years.

Both in the mechanics fields and the Plumbing trades we are taught since day one and our first boring class that we should never use dissimilar metals as they will corrode, set up electroylosis (see I did not pay attention is class cannot even spell this one!!) Anyway that thing electroy...whatever is where unlike metals set up a small electrical current between the materials. Causes the metals to corrode faster than if the same types.

In the real world....I have seen this rarely. It takes a lot of time and years for this to occur. Actually stainless steel fasteners are pretty good.

On a motorcycle I have seen iron bolts un-chromed corrode into the cylinder to the point they snap off and it takes two hours to drill them out.

In the plumbing field....copper connected to galvanized piping will corrode. But it will take it 25 years to do so. By then everything else is corroded too.

I dismiss the electrolosis theory as just that ....a theory. Some thing to be talked about and taught in books and in class rooms. In real life......it is not a big thing.

Kit


Tip.....when securing allen head fasteners use a standard set of allen wrenches. Not the T handle.......T handle is fine to take down with. but to build back use a regular L shape allen....when you are securing a fastener hold the wrench out on the end with one finger under the end of it.....and secure the fastener.....when you see the allen wrench just start to flex.....stop......it is like a built in torque wrench.....never exceed that and you will not strip a thread and have to drill it out and all that mess. Kit

In the telecommunication field I've seen bolts corroded in less than 6 months. When I was working for Motorolla, we had to put some die-electric grease on all connections regardless if they were dissimilar metals or not. Another good place to look at electrolosis is one place most people over look, the battery. Lead posts with metal clamps. I guess it all depends on what you have experienced.
 

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82gl1100iwingman wrote:
Kit Carson wrote:
About this dissimilar metals will corrode stuff. Yes they will corrode.....but it takes years. A lot of years.

Both in the mechanics fields and the Plumbing trades we are taught since day one and our first boring class that we should never use dissimilar metals as they will corrode, set up electroylosis (see I did not pay attention is class cannot even spell this one!!) Anyway that thing electroy...whatever is where unlike metals set up a small electrical current between the materials. Causes the metals to corrode faster than if the same types.

In the real world....I have seen this rarely. It takes a lot of time and years for this to occur. Actually stainless steel fasteners are pretty good.

On a motorcycle I have seen iron bolts un-chromed corrode into the cylinder to the point they snap off and it takes two hours to drill them out.

In the plumbing field....copper connected to galvanized piping will corrode. But it will take it 25 years to do so. By then everything else is corroded too.

I dismiss the electrolosis theory as just that ....a theory. Some thing to be talked about and taught in books and in class rooms. In real life......it is not a big thing.

Kit


Tip.....when securing allen head fasteners use a standard set of allen wrenches. Not the T handle.......T handle is fine to take down with. but to build back use a regular L shape allen....when you are securing a fastener hold the wrench out on the end with one finger under the end of it.....and secure the fastener.....when you see the allen wrench just start to flex.....stop......it is like a built in torque wrench.....never exceed that and you will not strip a thread and have to drill it out and all that mess. Kit

In the telecommunication field I've seen bolts corroded in less than 6 months. When I was working for Motorolla, we had to put some die-electric grease on all connections regardless if they were dissimilar metals or not. Another good place to look at electrolosis is one place most people over look, the battery. Lead posts with metal clamps. I guess it all depends on what you have experienced.
I will for sure agree with you about fasteners around batteries.....I am quite sure a plastic bolt would get ate up around a battery. A little battery acid...some fumes....and you have a mess. I have a center console boat......the batteries are in the console.....you hook up the charger to them and the fumes rise up and eat up all the electrical......get in rough water and slam the batteries around a bit and spill some battery acid and it gets on things and eats it up........yep I agree with you about that end of the game. Kit
 

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[suP]The electrolysis problem that some of you experience is determined by other factors besides the dissimilarity of themetals. [/suP]

[suP]Those of you who live in dry climates ar keep your Wings in a climate controlled garage when not in action, do not suffer the severe problems of us in the damp climates. Moisture is a catalyst for the reaction of dissimilar metals towards each other. If you add to that the addition of smog or contamination in the air, the problem worsens. [/suP]

[suP]Being a former outboard motor mechanic who grew up on a freshwater lake, I can fully attest to the galvanic action of dissimilar meters. After moving to The Sunshine State the difference is day & night. It isn't unusual to work on a freshwater motor from Chautauqua Lake, NY that is 20 yrs. old. In Florida, you're lucky if you can keep an outboard for more than 10 yrs - and that's only if you do a complete motor flush with fresh water and thendry storethe boatafter every time that you take it out! The combination of salt and water is deadly to aluminum and other metals by themselvesand being dissimilar only makes it worse. It doesn't matter if you immerse into the liquid or if it's airborn-the results are certain mortality. Acid rain wil have the same effect. If I remembered more of my h.s chemistry class, my teacher would be proud. That's my $.02 worth, so keep a smile on yer face and the bugs off yer teeth.[/suP]
 

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When you start talking about dissimilar metals there really is not one answer fro everything. It all depends so much on the circumstances.

Kit mentioned copper and galvanised being mixed and takes a long time for anything bad to happen, fair enough, but does anyone remember the aluminum wiring debacle?

It sure didn't take 25 years for fixtures to overheat and burn houses down, that was a copper/aluminum issue.

Personally I love stainless nuts bolts and screws and use them whenever possible, but galling is a very real issue, at its worst with stainless in stainless.

I am a great believer in nickel based anti-seize, once I started using that I never had another galled fitting on my sailboat.
 
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