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Starter system is just that a complete system with many interlocking devices all tied together to take an 1100 from dead to running. I am ignoring high voltage problems, gas delivery problems, and air problems and assuming we have fuel, spark and O2. That if the engine turns over at the rated speed by the starter motor it will start and run.

1- the battery is the source of power, no power no start no go. Start the process of charging the battery by an external charger and when fully charged check the individual cells with a hydrometer to verify each is charged. Battery voltage around 13 V fully charged, but more important is the state of charge, Specific gravity of the liquid conductor or electrolyte, around 1.25 -1.3. Also check the major cables +and- and keep the battery clean and the connectors clean. Do not use grease of any kind and that includes dielectric grease, never put anything between the connector and the posts of the battery, never carry the battery by the posts. Ground connections must be secure tight and clean, maintain them as you maintain the battery. Keep electrolyte above the battery plates, use distilled water only.

2-Main fuse may cause a problem for the whole electrical syetem since 1100 are from 1980-83, close to 30 years of service could cause metl fatiguecin a piece of alloy used as a fuse. They have a tendance to deteriorate and fail. Replace with ne fuse link or new type of fuse, never any bigger than OEM at 30 A, when installing any fuse verify voltage at both ends of the fuse.

3-Ignitionn switch or kill switch is there for your protection, never by-pass this device and verify operation in all 3 positions, if failed in a position replace or repair.

4- Start switch is an intermittant switch that you control. When pushed and all interlocks are correct the pushing action allows current to flow to the starter soenoid which is a big contactor (relay) that can handle large amps (100A) for the series wound starter motor. 7-8-The relay uses power only to draw in the armature at the end of its travel meshes with the poles faces of an electro magnet, attached is a cross arm holding contacts that close to control the starter itself. The starter button has contacts in it also that control the operation of the headlight. It turns the headlight off so that only currents flow to the starter motor, when the switch is released the headlight comes back on. Over time the large contacts get pitted or weld together, keeping the starter motor engaged, a dangerous event. Also the electro magnet gets dirty and the pole faces stick holding the intermittent relay in keeping the starter running. Check the contacts for pitting and check the pole faces for a flat machined surface and if there is a keeper wrapped around the pole faces inspect that this steel bandage is snug.

5-Clutch switch is an interlock that prevents starting the bike while in gear, pulling in the clutch by-passes this interlock. Verify this switch is securely mounted and test every so often that it is working.

6-Neutral diode allows current flow or stops current flow dependig on switches to ground, the neutral switch and the clutch switch, if either is operational you can not start the bike. But if in neutral gear position the clutch is by-passed. With the bike in gear and the clutch lever pullled in starting is allowed, too thick of oil in crankcase and too cold a temperature will cause movement. Safe is in neutral

7-8- see above. It is best to pull tis relay and inspect off the bike. Welded contacts can be repaired but it takes time and the shape of the contact is important, the coil assembly must be checked for integrity and the pole faces must be clean and square.

9-Neutral switch inside the bike at the shifter, problems arise between ths switch and the diodee giving a dim neutral light, a bright neutral light an always on neutral light an always off neutral light or something in between. A diode is a semi conductor, so is carbon. As such if there is an excess of electrons near these diodes or carbon there may be flow and this flow can be evidenced by the green neutral light. Flushing the oil from the transmissin area and crankcase may help, it depends how upset this device makes you.

10-The starting motor itself is a simple DC series wound motor and as such it works because it has a load tied to it. Testing this motor by running it without a load is useless because the armature and the fiels coils are in series. Revesring the + and - leads will not reverse direction of the moor. If you get here and everything has test OK, pull the motor and bench it. Disassembly is straight forward. Likely problems could be too much carbon dust, remember carbon becomes a semi conductor with voltage around, brush length worn out ( contributes the dusting), poor grounding connections, poor + connection, + post twisted loose, armature nicked, commutator not undercut between segments, dirty or bad bearing and remeber the location of any shims or spacers, the toorque produced in these motors is very high and oppasite to the rotation of it so that twisting effect must be held constant by bearings and shims, wrong placement of these shims or spacers can get this motor stuck.

Remember that all these components must operate correctly, in sequence for your bike to start running whever the starter swtch is engaged
 

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Nice write up. Copy it into Word and run spell checker. Once that's done re-post it and maybe we can get Wingnut to move it into the Reference and FAQ section as a sticky.
 

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Here you go

Starter system is just that a complete system with many interlocking devices all tied together to take an 1100 from dead to running. I am ignoring high voltage problems, gas delivery problems, and air problems and assuming we have fuel, spark and O2. That if the engine turns over at the rated speed by the starter motor it will start and run.

1- The battery is the source of power, “no power no start no go”. Start the process of charging the battery by an external charger and when fully charged check the individual cells with a hydrometer to verify each cell is charged. Battery voltage around 13.xx V fully charged, but more important is the state of charge, Specific gravity of the liquid conductor or electrolyte, around 1.25 -1.3. S.G. Also check the major cables + and - and keep the battery clean and the connectors clean. Do not use greases of any kind and that includes dielectric grease, never put anything between the connector and the posts of the battery, never carry the battery by the posts. Ground connections must be secure tight and clean, maintain them as you maintain the battery. Keep electrolyte above the battery plates, use distilled water only.

2-Main fuse may cause a problem for the whole electrical system since 1100’s are from 1980-83, close to 30 years of service could cause metal fatigue in a piece of alloy used as a fuse. They have a tendency to deteriorate and fail. Replace with new fuse link or new type of fuse, never any bigger than OEM at 30 Amp, when installing any fuse verify voltage at both ends of the fuse.

3-Ignitionn switch or kill switch is there for your protection, never by-pass this device and verify operation in all 3 positions, if failed in a position replace or repair.

4- Start switch is an intermittent switch that you control. When pushed and all interlocks are correct the pushing action allows current to flow to the starter solenoid which is a big contactor (relay) that can handle large amps (100A) for the series wound starter motor.
7-8-The relay uses power only to draw in the armature and at the end of its travel it meshes with the poles faces of an electro magnet, attached is a cross arm holding contacts that close to control the starter itself. The starter button has contacts in it also that control the operation of the headlight. It turns the headlight off so that only current flows to the starter motor; when the switch is released the headlight comes back on. Over time the large contacts get pitted or weld together, keeping the starter motor engaged which is a dangerous event. Also the electro magnet gets dirty and the pole faces stick; holding the intermittent relay in, keeping the starter running with the starter switch off. Check the contacts for pitting and check the pole faces for a flat machined surface and if there is a keeper wrapped around the pole faces inspect that this steel bandage is snug.

5-Clutch switch is an interlock that prevents starting the bike while in gear, pulling in the clutch by-passes this interlock. Verify this switch is securely mounted and test every so often that it is working.

6-Neutral diode allows current flow or stops current flow depending on switches to ground, the neutral switch and the clutch switch, if either is operational you can not start the bike. But if in neutral gear position the clutch is by-passed. With the bike in gear and the clutch lever pulled in starting is allowed, too thick of oil in crankcase and too cold a temperature will cause movement. Safe is in neutral position.

7-8- see above. It is best to pull this relay and inspect off the bike. Welded contacts can be repaired but it takes time and the shape of the contact is important, the coil assembly must be checked for integrity and the pole faces must be clean and square.

9-Neutral switch inside the bike at the shifter; problems arise between this switch and the diode giving a dim neutral light, a bright neutral light an always on neutral light an always off neutral light or something in between. A diode is a semi conductor, so is carbon. As such if there is an excess of electrons near these diodes or carbon there may be flow and this flow can be evidenced by the green neutral light. Flushing the oil from the transmission area and crankcase may help, it depends how upset this device makes you.

10-The starting motor itself is a simple DC series wound motor and as such it works because it has a load tied to it. Testing this motor by running it without a load is useless because the armature and the field coils are in series. Reversing the + and - leads will not reverse direction of the motor. If you get here and everything has tested OK, pull the motor and bench it. Disassembly is straight forward. Likely problems could be too much carbon dust, remember carbon becomes a semi conductor with voltage around, brush length worn out ( contributes the dusting), poor grounding connections, poor + connection, + post twisted loose, armature nicked, commutators not undercut between segments, dirty or bad bearing and remember the location of any shims or spacers, the torque produced in these motors is very high and opposite to the rotation of it, so that twisting effect must be held constant by bearings and shims, wrong placement of these shims or spacers can get this motor stuck.

Remember that all these components must operate correctly, in sequence for your bike to start running whenever the starter switch is engaged
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Hi long time lurker and cannot find out if the 82 start swith assem will wire into my 75 wiring.I did read it somewhere that it can work but the colors are diff.Anybody help me with this hookup or steer me in the right direction as my 75 switch assem fell apart and i have a spare 81 laying here.Thanx Jim
 

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Excellent post: thanks. One more thing I might add: it's very important to keep the ground strap terminal cleaned: the one under the left rear upper motor-mount plate. Seems that's a usual cause of poor starter motor performance, and is easily rectified.

They need to be very well grounded.

Again, thanks: usefull post. Cheers.
 

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Winger 81: Sell the '82 switch (it's more expensive than the '75)use the cash to buy the right one? I have a couple booting around. Otherwise, you'll be ruining a good '82 switch, and possibly the harness on that old '75 as well. Cheers.
 

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Thanx Straight thats the way ive decided to go since i just installed a new harness.Im doing the ebay thing to find the right one .Thank you for the advise.
 

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Hi everyone,

reading these posts, trying to figure out my '81 engine installation into my '83 Interstate differnces. It's a long story how I got here....but, has anyone done this engine swap? My '83 did not have the neutral switch on the right side, but the '81 does, how can I convert this to work? I appreciate any responses and appologize for changing direction of this thread!

WD40

Michigan
 

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Hi everyone,

reading these posts, trying to figure out my '81 engine installation into my '83 Interstate differnces. It's a long story how I got here....but, has anyone done this engine swap? My '83 did not have the neutral switch on the right side, but the '81 does, how can I convert this to work? I appreciate any responses and appologize for changing direction of this thread!

WD40

Michigan
 

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WD40, I hate to the harbinger of bad news, but it's a poor choice of engine-years to start with, for putting into your '83.


The '83 original has a lower first gear, and an overdrive gear. Whereas with the '83 engine you would be leisurely cruising at 82mph at 4250rpm, now you'll be doing nearly 5k rpm at the same speed. Frankly, you will not be happy with the comparative results. I oftengo the other way, and install '83 Standard and Interstate engines into 80's and '81's, for the higher gearing: with an inverse wiring problem that you have: I put an idiot light in a hole I drill in the choke-mount tab for the overdrive light, and set up a new harness for that purpose.


You have (interstate model) the neutral wire running to the dash and the OD line running to the dash. On the '80/81 engine it is a simple single switch running from the neutral-light switch to the tach, meshing as part of the harness which feeds the engine sensors. On the '83 I/S, you have a different plug-terminal under and behind the radiator than you do on the '80's. You have to ignore the overdrive wiring on the bike, and run a single wire, spiced into the neutral-line feeding the idiot light on the dash. It's that simple. The quick and dirty way to trace the proper wire to splice the single lead coming from the neutral switch on the lower right side of the engine: use a battery, two pieces of wire: ground the neutral side of the battery, and poke the positive lead into the two-wire terminal block which will typicallyplugs in under the left upper side of the rad, on a red block, if memory serves me right.



You'll see two terminal blocks back there: one feeds the sensors, one feeds the neutral/OD indicators. The wire you are looking for should be a light green & red striped wire, although the one from the engine switch is black. When you touch the right terminal with the positive lead, the neutral light will come on (providing the engine gearing is shifted into neutral, that is).

In this case, I'd recommend using the lead &terminal from your old engine, cutting it off as close to the engine case, or even inside the case if you can manage it, to get some extra 'lead':so you can use the properfemale terminal for the '83 harness, anddon't it mess it. After plugging that terminal together, then check for the proper wire, as above, dead end the other one.

Tapeup the dead ended Overdrive wire: it will be 'hot' when that terminal is plugged in, so you want to dead-end it properly.Strip theend of the wire that feeds the neutral light, down by the motor, put a small round terminal end on it, and attach to the neutral switch on the '80 motor.


However, disappointing as it may seem, even an '82 engine would be better for your purposes, as although the first gear ratio is not as good as the '83, it does have an overdrive gearing in 5th. Consider reselling that '80 mill, and finding an '82 or '83. You will be much happier with the results.
 

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Thanks, StraightWings,

I bought it off Craigslist as an '83 (so he said)but did not know to check engine numbers untill I noticed the side switch when I got it home. It has the 2100 series number and my '83 has 2300 numbers.

Engines are scarce here in SW lower Michigan locally or I would sell the '81. My '83 engine broke the sproket off the slave pump behind the clutch causing an oil pump failure. I shut down right away, then parked until Spring, I found the problem when I pulled off the rear cover.

This Spring I found a coolant leak in the left exhaust manifold. I figured a new engine was my cheap way out.

Thanks for your suggestions, I may continue the install, then sell the bike. Anyone have an '83 engine in Michigan?

WD40
 

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If you sell it: be kind: advise the new "Winger" that it's NOT an '83 engine. Consider taking it back and getting your bucks back, if it was represented as an '83.
I have an '82 mill in the yard, but it sure isn't Michigan. Shipping costs at about $250.
 

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I will try to get $ back, but the retired Sheriff had a tax bill to pay, and probably was told it was an '83. I would not mislead a buyer and appreciate your suggestions.
WD40
 

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I'm sorry, very much so in the context of the situation: but that's too funny: you got stiffed by a retired Sheriff? :D



Luck, bro!
 

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Seems as the Sheriff is illiterate as well as stupid. GL1100 engine for a 1200 frame? Duh.
 
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