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this is the second NEW r/r, 1st one put out 16-17volts bluw-up NEW battery,now 2nd NEW r/r overheating stator wires.Could my problem be the electrical clips i used to connect the three yellow wires? they seem tight fitting versus soldering them? By the way output is good @ 45VOLTS PER TEST UNHOOKED. THANKS FOR ANY HELP...
 

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Check your grounds. The regulator is supposed to short any excess energy to ground, keeping the charging rate at about 14.5 on a fully charged battery.

Could be your connectors but I'd check connections first.
 

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I second that. Check the regulator operation - if you are seeing 16-17 volts at the battery, something is wrong with your regulator. If the grounds on the regulator (there are two, both are green wires) are not good, you will have high voltage on the battery side of the regulator. If the grounds are good and you're still seeing high voltage at the battery, I would suspect the regulator.
 

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Thanks for such quick responses, this regulator only putting out the specified 15volts.But i will check the ground at regulator. thanks again guys.
 

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If reg at 15 volts where are you getting the higher readings? If your reg ground is poor the voltage will climb from the 15 the reg sees, but this higher reading is because of excess resistance fighting the discharge of amps flowing out and the result is more heat at the alt. It would not hurt to do maintenance on the complete electrical system ie wires, connectors and devices.
 

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O.K. I checked the ground on the wire harness side and ground is good @ both green and one black wires with r/r unplugged. This is actually the 3rd r/r and closer to the o.e. than the 1st two. No i'm not rich ,just desperate.All other tests fine,even in comparing to another 1200i.
 

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The 1st r/r was the one reading 16-17 volts, since then readings are 14-15 volts. sorry for any confusion.Again any help MUCH appreciated.
 

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14-15 Volts on a fully charged battery at higher rpm sounds OK.If memory serves me correct those readings are pretty standard for a normal alternator
 

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But why are my stator wires getting hot within seconds of running,enough to burn your fingers???confused I am.....
 

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I am no guru but I would suspect the connecters. I think I would solder them instead of crimp them together. Bad connection may be be causing resistance and heating the wires. Randy
 

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Thanks Randy,I thought about that last nite but my soldering skills arn"t great,but will try today..
 

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I've found the best way is to use one of the little Radio Shack butane torches. better heat than a soldering iron. I've just used a little longer piece of shrink tubing to cover the singed insulation. It's hard to keep the flame from melting it, but the torch seems to do a better job of heating the wires so the solder flows, and gives you a better solder joint.
 

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LOVE YA GUY'S!!! After soldering wires don't heat up but r/r does..But so does my friends 1200,so still being cautious at this point..In retrospect i think the aluminum clips were the culprit.AGAIN THANKS FOR ALL YOUR INFO..
 

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The rectifier does get hot normally. That is why it has heat disapation fins on it. Even the rectifier on a 1000 with it's anemic Stator gets hot. That seems the norm. So long as your wires are not hot and you are seeing 14.5-15 at the battery at full charge then I think you are good to go.
 

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Comparing my r/r getting hot to my friends 1200 it also gets very hot,I assume to discippate heat,anway everything seems fine now .Again thank GOD for the internet.....
 

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The alt always dumps excess amps cause it is simple minded. The reg has 2 choices put the amps to work in the battery or put the amps to ground. The amount of amps is determined by the battery state of charge, it really controls the charging, the reg tells the system when to discharge the amps, so if the battery is up and we do not stop the alternator, we have to let the alternator produce its limit at every second but we have no use for this excess and the simplest control that is also the cheapest for Honda is throw it to ground. 15 V pushing 300 watts, makes toast, the joint(s) have to take this excess and dissipate it, the result is heat.

Most things that produce heat are wasted, simply put this is wasted energy. You can recover it by charging yet another battery, but since the older bikes do not modulate the alternator, its either on or off, ie in using the current but as a rotating machine it is always on.
 

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Bikes like cars have 3 phase alternators that produce 3 phase power, at 120 degrees apart. Our bikes do not use a grounded AC 3 phase system but only produce power at the ends the windings that come out as 3 yellow wires. The wire size is usually too small, 'cause bigger wires mean a bigger alternator. The small wire size restricts the electrons in their flow since the electrons take up space, lots of electrons flowing at one time take up lots of space, thus heat.

Bike is a moving mass of steel, plastic and when moving lots of air comes into the nooks and crannies to cool stuff, even the alternator, the problem arises when you idle since there is not enough air movement to take away the excess heat.

Honda knew this and to help solve the problem insulation is used that meets this high heat, but as age takes over and more mechanical rework is done it seems most of us forget about the electrical system until it bites us in the butt.

So how do you keep your older Wing from showing its age..more chrome, more polish? Maintain your electrical system as often as you maintain the engine. If your bike has never had a once over now is the time. Every wire, every connector, every plug, everything must be verified. Remember when the bike was new it had a warranty of 3 years, so put it back to that condition.

I do not recommend the use of dielectric greases, because most people do not know how or when to apply. The manufacturer placed it so they knew they would have little electrical problems. It is a non conductive grease, at 15 V almost any grease is non conductive, so when you place it between contacts that contact will not flow. Another thing is stop washing your bikes with water and splashing around the electrics, wash with a bucket and a wrung dry cloth or just Lemon Pledge.

The brains of the bike need our help, just like some older people. The battery is utmost it must be fed and nurtured. The alternator feeds the battery, verify it every so often by reading what it puts out at any revs. The cables, connectors, plugs like old arteries get fouled up over time, make sure you check them too. In the end your intermittent problems will disappear. You can spend more time riding and less time worrying what next.

And remember heat is a prat of the system, get to realize what is normal and what is hot.
 
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