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I know this subject has been beat to death already but I would like a little more info.

I pulled the battery out of the bike (first time) to charge it up and I noticed that the bracket holding the battery was pretty rusty so I decided to pull that too to clean it up and paint it. To get the bracket out I had to disconnect the wiring that runs through holes in the bracket. When I tried to pull apart one of the connectors on the left I almost had to break it apart to make it separate. It finally let go and it looked like it had started to melt together. I then realized I was holding the connector with the now famous, three yellow wires from the stator. It doesen't look like they ever had the opportunity to short out (no burn marks) but they were hot enought to soften the plastic in the connector.

I know the immediate fix for this is to cut off the connector and solder the wires together. My question is - Is it necessary to match wire-to-wire as they would be in the connector? Next winter, when I tear the bike down, I will replace the wiring harness. Perhaps Dave Campbell can recommend a good source for one.:D

Also, whats the best type of paint to use on the battery bracket?
 

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Battery bracket and stator plug have been hit with sulfuric acid from the battery. The bracket needs to come out, be thoroughly cleaned of all acid and probablya "Rust Oleum" primer and paint. Hopefully the plastic isolators are still there (that the battery sits in), clean them too. Baking soda and water will neutralise the acids.

That the stator plug fails due to acid is evident in that the same 3 wires enter the regulator with the same current, but they dont burn up. Notice the stator plug is right beside the battery drain tube...

Just cut out the stator plug and solder the wires. The connector is there for mass manufacturing only. honda floated the "new replacement connector" idea but guys got tired of replacing them when they failed again.

The stator is not "phased" so it doesnt matter which wire in stator goes to which in harness.

Good source for harness? Probably. LOL As long as its charging over 14 and engines not overheating, no immediate worry.

PS also watch for acid on the exhaust system and frame, can make a mess.:shock:
 

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Now that you mention battery acid damage things ae starting to make sense. I went to disconnect the battery overflow, it was already disconnected. And I am pretty sure I didn't knock it loose trying to separate the stator wire connector.

The muffler is toast already and I have a replacement ready to go in as soon as I receive a gasket or two.
 

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Dave is right, Rustoleum is a good paint for the battery bracket. You can however get acid resistant paint at many car parts shops. Also I've had good luck with the stuff they sell to dip plier handles in. Make sure your battery is a manifold type with the drain tube. To prevent this kind of stuff in the future keep the battery terminals well coated in grease, make sure your overflow tube is long enough to hang down 2-3 inches below the frame and secured so it can't flop in the breeze. I keep a tie wrap around the tube up near the battery holding it to the bracket so that there's less chance the thing can come off the battery. Battery corrosion is the only reason I can see for folks buying those expensive new sealed gel cell batteries, I really don't believe they last any longer, but at least they don't give off nasty fumes and acid.
 
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