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I've got an 85 Interstate with 36K. It is still charging like a million bucks. Should I absolutely cut that plug out with the three yellow wires and solder them. I know this has been talked about and I don't want to beat a dead horse but I would just like some final opinions before I start cutting.

Thanks Dan
 

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Yes, it will save you problems in the long run, and it does not take long to do!
 

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I did that on my12 after replacing the stator. Everyone that I talk to says the same thing...snip that plug.
 

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If it melts on a trip, you loose power on the road & you could damage your stator. history tells us that this will happen with a 100% probability!
 

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If it melts on a trip, you loose power on the road & you could damage your stator. history tells us that this will happen with a 100% probability!
 

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The connectors are there is because they are required for assembly line production. Now they are a liability. Solder the connections at the reg/rec as well.

I fix broken wires for a living and high load mechanical electricalconnections are problems waiting to happen.

The yellow wires are undersized and heat up.

Heat and loose connections cause corrosion.

Corrosion causes resistance which causes more heat and so on until something melts.

When the circuit blows open a surge can go through the stator destroying it.

Solder is cheaper than stators.
 

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The connectors are there is because they were required for assembly line production. Now they are a liability. Solder the connections at the reg/rec as well.

I fix broken wires for a living and high load mechanical electricalconnections are problems waiting to happen.

The yellow wires are undersized and heat up.

Heat and loose connections cause corrosion.

Corrosion causes resistance which causes more heat and so on until something melts.

When the circuit blows open a surge can go through the stator destroying it.

Solder is cheaper than stators.
 

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cut the wires and go for it,just doing the poorboy coversion on my 87 which i thought was OK,and went to pull the stator connector at the battery found that it was melted together but was not visable from the outside,and when u do make sure u check the health of the stator,if you dont have a voltmeter
full time u might be surprised on how well your charging system actually is,my system was bare minimum at 50n volts per leg,just a matter of time till it goes out,at least with the poorboy if a have a failure on the road i can pull the fuses and reconnect the regulator and keep going till end of trip
same as paying for car insurance and hoping u never use it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Thanks for your replies. Should I be using connectors or do I twist the wires together and then solder them?? I'm ready to go.

Dan
 

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Solder then shrink wrap
 

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After the connector surgury, try to always retire the bike with fresh oil at the end of riding season. Concensus seems to be that the acids/combustion by-products in the crankcase oil are a big reason why the insulation of the stator starts to break-down and create the high loads/temps on the wiring and connectors... :gunhead:
 

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Shooter wrote:
After the connector surgury, try to always retire the bike with fresh oil at the end of riding season.
:baffled:End of what riding season:baffled:



:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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I was thinking the same thing. Here in Houston, you can ride all year long. :banana::banana:
 

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Thanks guys. Jobs done and it's charging like a million bucks. Boy I had no idea how hot that plug got. It looked fine but when handling it after running the engine I can see how things get melted. Thanks again

Dan:waving:
 

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I did the voltage test at 3500 rpms, A-B, B-C, C-A AC and got 70+ volts for all three. Did I do this test right? I only have one AC setting. Also, at idle with a volt meter at the battery I'm getting 14.9 volts. How does this all sound??

Dan
 

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nightwizard40 wrote:
Shooter wrote:
After the connector surgury, try to always retire the bike with fresh oil at the end of riding season.
:baffled:End of what riding season:baffled:



:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
Come on Dave, give me a little slack here will ya. The original poster is further North than me... :cheeky1::cheeky1: :gunhead:
 

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mpd350 wrote:
I did the voltage test at 3500 rpms, A-B, B-C, C-A AC and got 70+ volts for all three. Did I do this test right? I only have one AC setting. Also, at idle with a volt meter at the battery I'm getting 14.9 volts. How does this all sound??

Dan
Some might say that it's too high. I'm getting about 14.4vdc for the last four years, just keep an eye on your battery fluid level... :gunhead:
 
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