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Made a bearing installer for bottom bearing on steering stem. It's made out of the inside of the old bearing and is welded to an 11/2" pipe with a cap on it. A couple of good hits with hammer and you will drive it home. I cant seem to get pics onto this site so anyone interested in some pics will have to get me an e-mail address and I can send it as an attachment
 

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just curious what tool did you use to remove the lower stem bearing???, JB
 

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A cold chisel. About 4 hits with hammer and it came off. Just be careful not to marr the stem.
 

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I used a dremel tool with an abrasive wheel to cut through the race, just enough that when I put a cold chisel in the groove I made, the race split with no damage to the stem.

When I re-installed thebottom bearing, I put the stem in the freezer over night and used the old race and a piece of pipe to drive the new bearing on as soon as I took out the stem from the freezer. It didn't take much effort to get it in place.

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Here are two photos of the Genuine Honda Socket tool I bought from Cyclemax. Very well made, good heavy weightand extremely solid. Looks and feels like it will last forever. Having spent an absolute fortune on my wing I felt it essential to spend a few quid and have the right tool for the job. Especially when adjusting and setting the correct torque on something as important as the steering head.



 

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Very nice tool! I made mine from a Ridgid hole saw. Torque on that nut is not that much. I will probably use it one time and I am only out $11.00. If you are a bike Mechanic you need the good tools. If you can make a suitable tool for far less than why not. Did you buy the socket for that top nut as that requires much more torque.
 

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The socket is for the top nut on the GL1800 which requires a very accurate torque setting. You give it a good torque to get the bearings to sit in properly then you back off to the recommended setting which I believe is 18lbs torque. Unfortunately the nut is designed with a head the needs the above tool to turn it and you need it to make the accurate torque adjustment. You can make a DIY tool from a socket but I bought the Honda one as I was buying other stuff and I bought my Dollars when it was $2 to the £1 and brought it home with me on the plane from Vegas. I will probably end up lending it to others who may need it over here in the UK after I have installed my 'All Balls' Bearing kit. It was a lot bigger and solid than I expected and looks like it will stand a lot of abuse. Really good thing for my toolbox.
 

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Ah, the bearings and nut configuration on your's is different from the 1200. I got ya now. Makes good sense. I just installed my stem bearing a few short minutes ago after pulling it from freezer. Tool works great,no effort at all getting it on. My wife is pushing me to get the bike back together.
 

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My races came out easily as did the bearing. I used a 3/8" rod I bought at Home Depot and about 4 taps and it was out. Sounds like you did what I did only I welded mine to the pipe and ground the inside of the old bearing piece to make it easier to remove. Whaever it takes to get the job done!
 

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I use a brass drift to knock the bearing races out of the steering head. Just takes a few taps on each side to walk them out. A couple of screwdrivers or small cold chisels tapped under the lower bearing will start it up the stem. It's important not to hit the stem itself. John, Jluvs2dive found a piece of tubing to drive the lower bearing back on. I think he said it was a shower rod or some such from Home Depot. He said it pushed the bearing right back on easily. I did it the hard way alternately tapping (very carefully on the inner race) with a small punch. John's method works easier. I also heat the bearing up and freeze the stem prior to reassembling. I think John said he didn't have to do that to get the bearing back on with the piece of steel tube and a hammer.
 
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