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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My hazard lights push switch and the rev switch stick. What is a good lubricant for Gl1800 switches. What chemicals to avoid.
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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go to Home Depot or Lowes and pickup CRC 2-26
it is made for that problem and it is safe for Plastics.



Some auto supply stores also carry it, under $10 bux
 

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The CRC works great on the volume, channel, and speed up and down switches. These are dry switches and just need the contacts cleaned when they stop working.

For the hazard and reverse switches, you need to pull them apart like Dennis said. You need to remove the old grease that gets sticky and replace it with fresh dielectric grease. Same goes for the turn signal switch. There are small springs and the part that locks the switch on that stop moving when the grease gets sticky. Spray lube/cleaner is just a band aid for these switches. In no time you will be right back to where you are now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
T
Some will argue this, but WD-40 will usually free up the switches temporarily, however, it's best to take the housings apart and clean the actual switch, then apply some dielectric grease.
Thanks
The CRC works great on the volume, channel, and speed up and down switches. These are dry switches and just need the contacts cleaned when they stop working.

For the hazard and reverse switches, you need to pull them apart like Dennis said. You need to remove the old grease that gets sticky and replace it with fresh dielectric grease. Same goes for the turn signal switch. There are small springs and the part that locks the switch on that stop moving when the grease gets sticky. Spray lube/cleaner is just a band aid for these switches. In no time you will be right back to where you are now.
Thanks Snowmoer. I agree that the dried grease needs to be removed. FYI, WD-40 is not a lubricant. It was designed as water displacement, therefore its name. The 40th experiment is what we use today. WD-40 will tend to wash out lubricants including grease. If these efforts don't work then by all means disassemble and lubricate with new grease. I am waiting to see if WD-40 and CDC work before taking the switch apart. Thank you for your reply and excellent advise.
ScubaBill
 

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My hazard light switch stuck also. I wound up using silicone lube to unstick it but it only lasted a couple of seasons. I wound up using Radio Shack tuner cleaner and lube and also found that the switch in the way its mounted binds againsted the outside plate on the bottom. I actually took some fine sandpaper to the bottom where the switch goes in and out and that helped immensely. The reverse switch the tuner cleaner and lube worked well so Im good to go with that.
 

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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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WD-40 now has a White Lithium based spray product.
it is not as thick as White Lithium grease, but it has helped me with squeaky doors on my truck and car.

I would suggest using WD-40 to clean out the dirt,
CRC 2-26 to get things working again,
and then followup with the WD-40 Lithium spray.

I do not know, if the new WD-40 Lithium spray will effect plastics.
I would just exercise caution and cover up the plastics until you are done.
 

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2008 GL1800 Airbag "Titanium Torpedo". Former 1987 GL1200.
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Deoxit D5 by Caig Laboratories is the standard for cleaning and lubricating electrical connections, switches, relays, controls, etc. Don't know how well it holds up to weather, but most wings are kept inside most of their life. I used this on turn signal control on my GL1200 and it worked fine. I replaced the hazard switch on my GL1800 with one that lights up when it's on, so you can tell by looking at the switch. Maybe got it from Electrical Connection.
 

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2013 Honda F6 B
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Some will argue this, but WD-40 will usually free up the switches temporarily, however, it's best to take the housings apart and clean the actual switch, then apply some dielectric grease.
so has anyone ever done a video on the Honda Goldwing/F6b on these sticky switch's fix
 
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