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I'm at a total loss here. Done every single trick recommended on this site, and I still havevery weakfront brakes. The rear/linked works decently enough but guys...this is really dangerous as I ride two up a lot.



My lever is pretty firm. There's just simply nothing else I can do to get this thing working. Now what?



Banjo bled

MityVac bled -w- teflon tape on bleeder

Gravity bled

Zip tie lever overnight

Verified pistons going in/out

Cleared small hole in MC



Haven't changed the brake line or pads yet, my last options.
 

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changing the pads and replacing the brake fluid is the best insurance you can buy.
 

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mine's the same being trying all the trick's,tried last night with the spray nozle syndrome, new pad's next
never had a problem last year






chris in va wrote:
I'm at a total loss here.  Done every single trick recommended on this site, and I still have very weak front brakes.  The rear/linked works decently enough but guys...this is really dangerous as I ride two up a lot. 

 

My lever is pretty firm.  There's just simply nothing else I can do to get this thing working.  Now what?

 

Banjo bled

MityVac bled -w- teflon tape on bleeder

Gravity bled

Zip tie lever overnight

Verified pistons going in/out

Cleared small hole in MC

 

Haven't changed the brake line or pads yet, my last options.
 

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Not sure about the 1100 but on the 1200 the pedal operates one side of the front brake system as well as the back brake . Mabye bleeding the back will help.
 

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I think you have to go with the line and the pads. They can make a big difference.
 

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If your lines are old they maybe expanding and taking the fluid away from the calipers..you only have so much volume to push and if it goes into expanding lines the calipers will never lock up.
 

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RB wrote:
If your lines are old they maybe expanding and taking the fluid away from the calipers..you only have so much volume to push and if it goes into expanding lines the calipers will never lock up.
great to keep in mind.
 

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As a previous member states if you have got a firm lever then bleeding is not the answer, the pads may be too hard, investigate if there is an alternative.

Stainless braided hoses are the final one or replace with OEM
 

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Monkey with a Football
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Go to HH series IBC pads and make sure your rotor surfaces are absolutely flat across the surface.
 

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Ok, thanks guys. When I get some money next week I'll order some HH pads. Had them on my Magna, helped a little bit over the stockers. I honestly don't know the age of the pads on there now, could be original for all I know. The bike has almost 42k miles and there's a fair amount of pad left.



The line will have to come later, but still on my list.
 

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check to see when you pull the brake lever, if the brake hose expan you might need new brake lines. suppose to change every 10 yrs.




chris in va wrote:
I'm at a total loss here.  Done every single trick recommended on this site, and I still have very weak front brakes.  The rear/linked works decently enough but guys...this is really dangerous as I ride two up a lot. 

 

My lever is pretty firm.  There's just simply nothing else I can do to get this thing working.  Now what?

 

Banjo bled

MityVac bled -w- teflon tape on bleeder

Gravity bled

Zip tie lever overnight

Verified pistons going in/out

Cleared small hole in MC

 

Haven't changed the brake line or pads yet, my last options.
 

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i read all your posts but the one thing i seem to miss is nothing is mentioned about doing anything at the caliper side,after awhile they get corroded in the bores and may be hanging up in the bores just about the place that stops u from having "good" brakes, u might try taking the caliper off,remove pads,and gently pump out pistons a little bit,then spray some wd40 or fastbreak gently onto the bore area and let sit awhile before pressing the pucks back in,do this a couple times being sure not to "pump out" the pucks pm or email me a # and can explain a little better via phone
 

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That's possible too neoracer. They do stick just a bit but come out regardless. The procedure wouldn't start them leaking would it?
 

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If the lever is firm air or expanding hoses is not the issue.
Could be the type of pads you have just don't have the proper friction material to do the job. I am a big believer in OEM brake pads, a little pricey but worth it.
 

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Ole Guy
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Have the pads ever been soaked with oil? Do your rotors have burn marks or over heating streaks? I changed my front pads after fork oil leaked on them. One of them just did not have the friction needed anymore. After an extreme braking experience, the rotor appeared to be burned on one side and still is from too much heat. I decided to replace the oil soaked pads. The new pads made the difference.

The idea about inspecting the piston bores is smart. Remove the pistons and replace the "O" rings, makes sure all deformities are smoothed out if any. Is the piston able to freely slide in and out of the bores without the "o" ring? It must be able to do that. I had a 1977 Dodge van with synthetic pistons that after time swelled and would stick it the bores. After a few miles the piston would swell and not retract. I doubt this is your problem, but worth checking.

Between front and rear brake is a coupler of some sort ( I can't remeber the details) but check into that little devise and besure it not clogging with build up (old fuild). I think it is some sort of equalizer valve to balance the front and rear pedal presure.

When my pads were oily, I think only one side was actually doing all the braking on the front. So with maximum presure on the front hand lever, braking was minimal and the single rototr would over heat and now has burn marks. It did not warp, so I still use it.

I posted an article on an inexpensive, home-made power brake bleeder for under $7.00. Just chack all the articles about bleeding brakes. It uses engine vacuum to puge trapped air and change oil. I made it when I changed my front pads and could not get past the spongy front brakes. There are a number of good ideas for bleeding trapped air, this one has never failed me.

If you lines expand with presure, you should be able to see that happening with it parked. If you place your hand on the line, you can feel it too. I have seen my lines expand and did not change them, but do wonder if they might ever pop in a panic stop!
 

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I don't know if this will help, but when you replace pads on a car you usually have to use a clamp to collapse the piston enough to get the new pad to fit.

With your old pads on the piston, use a C clamp & collapse the piston all the way in until it bottoms. Maybe you still got some air trapped in the system or something partially blocking a passage way.

I guess you've got nothing to loose. These bikes never did have the world's best brakes. At best they were adequate.
 

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cycleman wrote:
.....when you replace pads on a car you usually have to use a clamp to collapse the piston enough to get the new pad to fit.
Remember as you force the pistons back into the caliper, the displaced fluid goes back into the master cylinder. Use caution to prevent overflowing the reservoir and spilling brake fluid onto paint.
 

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Old bikes...

Remove, strip and clean calibers, pistons, replace seals, reinsert piston using brake fluid as lube, thread seal bleeder. Clean master and kit. Sand brake disc to remove dirt and glaze. Toss all old hoses and replace along with fresh banjo crush washers. Bench bleed master, connect to top end and do system bleed.

The last bike I bought, the 06 freaked me, it's so intact
A few bikes earlier I had to beat the rear drum and shoes off as it had been sitting outside. Bikes! the systems are so small and everything is exposed. Nice thing is the parts are usually only 5 or 6 times more expensive than auto parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
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Have the pads ever been soaked with oil? Do your rotors have burn marks or over heating streaks
Not that I can tell, but not sure the age of the pads. It has 42k miles on the bike so it's possible the pads could be many MANY years old. The rotors look fine with no burn marks or streaking/gouging.

We took the bike out yesterday for a 120 mile ride. As I was backing down the nearly-level driveway, I tried jamming on the front brake hard as I could only to have it keep rolling backward...and that's just with me on it.

The rear linked brake works as it should, thankfully.
 
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