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Discussion Starter #1
I am working on a 1984 GL1200 Aspencade. The clutch reservoir is totally dry (came like this from previous owner) so I went to crack open the bleed screw to bleed the line at the slave cylinder, but it was very difficult to loosen and now it just keeps turning with the same level of force required every time I turn it and the bleed screw does not back out. I'm guessing it is stripped.
My plan is to remove the part of the clutch cover where the bleed screw goes into (circled in green in the image below) so I can get a better look at what's going on. I'm just wondering, do I have to drain the engine oil before I do this or is the engine oil and transmission fluid in two different sections? Thanks
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I am working on a 1984 GL1200 Aspencade. The clutch reservoir is totally dry (came like this from previous owner) so I went to crack open the bleed screw to bleed the line at the slave cylinder, but it was very difficult to loosen and now it just keeps turning with the same level of force required every time I turn it and the bleed screw does not back out. I'm guessing it is stripped.
My plan is to remove the part of the clutch cover where the bleed screw goes into (circled in green in the image below) so I can get a better look at what's going on. I'm just wondering, do I have to drain the engine oil before I do this or is the engine oil and transmission fluid in two different sections? Thanks
View attachment 323306
I think you have a good plan. Get it on a bench where you can work on it.

It will drill out very easy as it is hollow, but before that try a few things.

By tapping on the bleeder and the slave cylinder near and around the bleeder should loosen the grip between the two parts.

Next you could try to drive something down the hollow part of the bleeder screw. (like a nail etc) This will add to the strength of the stuck bleeder.

Make sure you are using a 6 point socket whatever method you are trying.

My last idea is many times when in that situation, I try different sockets on the damaged part.

If you have a socket that is too small you can drive it on the the damaged bleeder.

If you manage to get the smaller socket on it usually fits so tight, you have to drive the bad bleeder out of the socket.

Oh, don't worry if you have to drive an SAE socket on the metric bleeder. I'm sure you will get it one way or the other.
 

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1987 GL1200 Interstate
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No, you do not have to drain the motor oil. The level should be below the opening where the rod enters the clutch housing.

If the master is completely empty, then you should probably replace both seals and the cup. #s 9, 14 and 15.
 

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Before you do that,when I got my 1200 the reservoir was dry.I put in the fluid and bled the master at the banjo bolt and it pumped right up.still holding well as I right this

Sent from my LM-X420 using Tapatalk
 

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So I’m reading that the screw is turning in the opening, but not threading out. Is that correct? If the threads have stripped out, I’d bet it is the housing bore threads that have been damaged. I’d be removing it for inspection and expect to be replacing the assembly. I have seen folks bleed a system by loosening the banjo bolt at the supply line at the slave cylinder. But you may not remove all the air.
I watched an ‘old timer’ flush a brake system by placing paper clips in the tops of brake cylinders and letting the system gravity bleed. Bleeder screws were never touched. Probably wouldn’t have loosened up anyhow.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm going to tackle this project this week. My only concern is the slave cylinder looks like a pain in the ass to access. The frame is directly behind it with about 3" of room to work. Just out of curiosity what is the name for part #4 in the diagram?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Okay, so the slave assembly came out quite easily. Strangely, the bleeder bolt threads are fine. I think the socket I was using was turning on the bleeder nut. A six point 8mm socket seemed to turn it out fine now, so I think it's okay. Upon inspection, the piston was totally seated in the cylinder with lots of gunk on it. A few hard whacks on a piece of wood dislodged the piston. After closer inspection, it looks like the only part that's damaged is the oil seal (#15 on the diagram) that's seated in the face of the piston. It looked a bit mangled (shown with oil seal removed in the 3rd picture below). I believe this is part# 91209MB0003. If I clean up the slave cylinder and piston and replace the oil seal do you think this will be sufficient or is there anything else I should do? Thanks
Also, is this oil seal a difficult part to find?
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With that seal in that bad of shape, I would closely inspect the seal in the clutch cover as well. Please note; that seal is a problem getting out for most here and many (most) end up removing the cover from the bike to service the seal.

However, I had no trouble replacing the seal on the bike. Go figure.

Rebuild kits are available on eBay or you can buy the (preferred) individual parts from Honda.
 

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There must be a seal in the casing bore for the piston to seal fluid on, change that as well but make sure you get all the crud out of the groove, especialy the corners
 

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Discussion Starter #18
With that seal in that bad of shape, I would closely inspect the seal in the clutch cover as well. Please note; that seal is a problem getting out for most here and many (most) end up removing the cover from the bike to service the seal.

However, I had no trouble replacing the seal on the bike. Go figure.

Rebuild kits are available on eBay or you can buy the (preferred) individual parts from Honda.
When you say inspect the seal in the clutch cover do you mean #9 or #14 on the diagram? #9 seems like a seal around the base of the piston and it looks to be in good shape.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
There must be a seal in the casing bore for the piston to seal fluid on, change that as well but make sure you get all the crud out of the groove, especialy the corners
Could that be #9 in the diagram? It seems to be a rubber seal around the base of the piston. Because I don't see any other seals in the cylinder bore. When the piston goes into the cylinder bore it has a rubber seal on the bottom of it.
 

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#9 is called the cup and should be changed. #14 is the seal in the clutch cover that seals around the actuator rod to keep brake fluid from getting into the engine oil.
 
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