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I tried to split the carbs in half today to get at the o-ring/gaskets, but could only get one screw out. The rest seem to have loc-tite, and i don't want to strip the soft phillip head on them. Damn carbs are still leaking so it looks like i have to replace the fuel o-rings and gasket at the plenum-to-carb. Any tips on getting those long screws moving? Also, can i re-use my old gaskets/o-rings from my other carb set if they are still soft and pliable?
 

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Have you tried an impact screw driver?:baffled:
 

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As mentioned the impact driver is a usefull tol.

I have a phillips screwdriver with an 18" shaft, it works as a torque multiplier and it lets you get a good bite while putting your shoulder into the work.

I purchased it at my local Home Depot
 

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try tapping the head of the screw with a hammer and soaking in penetrating oil. also you can sometimes get some needle nose vise grips and grab the screw enough to break it lose.
 

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 .. I have found  that for stuborn , rusted  bolts that a 2 day soak in the penetrating oil that the pro's use works wonders...  Around here .. its called " Metalon  Penetrant" ... but go to a quality machine shop,and ask just what they  use... The good stuff is much,much better than WD - 40.. and really gets into those tiny spaces... Caution.. some of the penetrant  oils also soften rubber,and plastic a bit.. so read the directions first !!,  SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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thanks, guys. i was concerned about using an impact driver causing damage. Tried tapping with a hammer on driver already, but not penetrating oil. Any thoughts on using the the old gasket/o-rings?
 

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Youshould first spray the screws with a lube , then, if possible, put a good screwdriver in and tap it a few times. You should not have to whale on it.Ihave beendisassembling my carbsand found the screws would not break loose, even using the best tipped and longest handle in the box. I use a small set of Vice Grips. You do not need to crush the screw head, just adjust them enough to where they do not slip as you start to turn. It works best if you can get them to bite from the side of the screw. A little spray lube before trying to turn will help. It is usually not the threads that get corroded and stuck. In most cases, the screw head is stuck to what ever it is against.

As to your o-rings, that would be a 50-50 shot. They may be pliable, but remember, they were squeezed in place when installed for awhile. I would look them over closely to see if there are any nicks and wear spots. Good Luck!

 

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mag wrote:
I tried to split the carbs in half today to get at the o-ring/gaskets, but could only get one screw out. The rest seem to have loc-tite, and i don't want to strip the soft phillip head on them. Damn carbs are still leaking so it looks like i have to replace the fuel o-rings and gasket at the plenum-to-carb. Any tips on getting those long screws moving? Also, can i re-use my old gaskets/o-rings from my other carb set if they are still soft and pliable?
Mag, if those screws do in fact have Loc-Tite on them no amount of lubricant will free them. Even an impact driver might not budge them. Heat is the best way to free Loc-Tite on smaller screws.

Maybe try heating an old screw driver shank to be red hot then placing that ina screw head until it cools. It will take a lot to get that heat to travel through the length of that screw shank & effect the Loc-Tite on the attachment end but worth a try. Other than that I usually just drill the screw heads off then slide the float bowl off over the screw shank. Once the float bowl is removed you can use heat directly on the screw & use a pair of butcher pliers (Vise Grips) to back them out.



Also, can i re-use my old gaskets/o-rings from my other carb set if they are still soft and pliable?
Possibly, with the difficulty of getting at those carbs I guess I personally wouldn't chance using older gaskets & "O" rings.

Twisty
 

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Impact driver worked. I tried the old airbox gasket from my other carbs -- leaky leaky. However, the fuel o-rings on the 'rebuilt' set weren't OEM, just flat edged donuts. My old o-rings were still soft and pliable (and don't leak) so i put them in. I'm picking up a new Honda OEM air chamber gasket today, then i'll bolt it all up and see what happens!
 

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The flat edged donuts were probably someone's home made o-rings made by slicing a bit of tubing. Twisty is telling you right about getting screws loose that have locktite. Another method that would work with heating is to dip the tip of the screw driver in a bit of valve grinding compound, I've even used toothpaste in a bind once, both have grit that will help the screwdriver hang onto the screw. An impact driver is very good but you have to be careful that what ever you apply it to can stand the thrust of the hammer blow.
 

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I just got done re-doing my carbs and did not touch a single screw without using the impact driver first. A light tap will get most of them going, but one slip with a regular driver and you are screwed. Better safe than sorry. The bi-metal corrosion is a serious issue with almost every carb I have ever had the displeasure of messing with.
 

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I think those screws are #3 Phillips, NOT #2 Phillips. A #2 (standard cross-tip screwdriver bit) will only strip the head. Try a #3 and see how that works.
 

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Aesop wrote:
The bi-metal corrosion is a serious issue with almost every carb I have ever had the displeasure of messing with.
That's why I always use anti-seize in those places. Aluminum pot metal and steel just about weld together in the presence of dampness, an aluminum anti-seize will keep them free. Good for exhaust bolts, studs, and nuts if you have hi-temp anti-seize. I use the stuff because I'm getting too old and tired to fight the damn things. If you keep the bike you will eventually go back to most of those fasteners in the future and won't really want a rematch. If you have nothing better plain old grease will help some by keeping the moisture out of the threads. Some claim it's a bad practice because the screws will loosen due to the lubrication, but I've never experienced it.
 

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axelwik wrote:
I think those screws are #3 Phillips, NOT #2 Phillips.  A #2 (standard cross-tip screwdriver bit) will only strip the head.  Try a #3 and see how that works.


Yes indeed, #3. Luckily i have spare carb rack to practice on, which i did by taking the carbs apart using impact wrench and examining/pulling rubber parts. Anyway, on re-assemble, i took the best 5 screws from both carb sets to join the carb halves. Then i screwed em in good with my ratchet + #3 phillips head. Wish i had used it from the start, but that's the learning curve for ya!
 

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Okay, maybe I'm just up in the night and I KNOW I'm probably the biggest motard on this forum when it comes to mechanics but I haven't heard this trick my dad taught me years ago. Sometimes, when dealing with recalcitrant screws that don't want to come out, try tightening them just a little fraction. Probably doing the same thing you are already doing by breaking them free with tapping and impact drivers and I sure would want to be careful not to over-torque but I've used this trick many times.

Ruaidh
 

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Ruaidh,your suggestion oftrying to slightly tighten the screw/boltis dead on. I had completely forgotten about that. Buy 'em books and send 'em to school...:rollingeyes:
 

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With all the guru's and genius's on here I feel so good when I actually have something to contribute.

Well, something besides my bent sense of humor.

Ruaidh
 

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that's a good tip. One has to be careful with soft-head screws, however. It does work great with cap-head bolts of larger size (17mm, say) though!
 

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That is one trick I have never heard of or tried but I will!! :goofygrin::goofygrin::goofygrin:
 

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Just be careful with tightening. If the screws are in pretty tight and have corroded a bit there's a good chance of twisting them off.
 
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