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i posted the link instead of c/p since it has pictures.

http://www.quattro123.com/RecifierFix.htm
My son did this on his CBR honda over a year ago and has not looked back since.

i think i am going to try this but was looking for any advice.
 

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That thing looks awfully small. Don't know what the charge output of a CBR1000 or the donor Suzuki are but if less than the wing it probably wouldn't last long.
 

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Well, i know it 14 volts, i am not sure about the amps.
Mine is kicking 15.6 volts right now, i really do not want to burn up the new GM-battery. I can get a known working gsxr regulator for free however i am making sure before i try anything.
mine has been replaced in the past by someone and was hardwired in.
As long as it can keep up the amps i am thinking it should be fine.
I am going to check my sons this weekend to see what kind of amp output it has.
 

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It is the amps that is relevant. Those sport bikes have a very minimal electrical system and are not meant to have anything added such as extra lights and radios and such so the charging system probably puts out less current than a 4 cyl Goldwing. I could be wrong but I can see that regulator smoking pretty quick. I really hope it does work so there will be an alternative to the OEM Honda part.
 

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As soon as i get all the info i will post it up.
 

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Your Goldwing stator can put out 300W at highway speed. That's about 24amps for the rectifier/regulator to handle. The rectifier part of the unit won't have a problem but the regulator is another story. Bike regulators tend to be shunt types which dump excess current to ground to hold the voltage more or less constant. If the regulator can't handle the shunt current it will overheat and fail.
Your overly high voltage may not be a failing regulator but could be a bad connection, especially the ground connection. It would be well worth while to check the connector for signs of overheating like blue contacts or melted plastic. Green corrosion is another sign of connector problems. Check the ground lead to make sure it's connection to the bike frame is clean and tight.
 

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