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A friend just had a front brake fluid leak on his 1200. He was on a ride and before he was able to clean up the bike there was brake fluid all over the bodywork. If he had not switched to synthetic he could have had some serious paint damage.

If this happened at the end of a ride and you did not notice until the next morning ???
 

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i had no reason to change to synthetic but if what you say is true that it wont damage the paint ill use synthetic next time
 

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Make sure you can use synthetic in your bike first before changing over or adding.
 

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Hey Iron Butter... Which Synth?

The DOT5.1 synth we've got here (valvolene?) eats the styrenes just like the DOT4 stuff and the DOT3 stuff that came before...


did your buddy switch to DOT5 ? or is there a specific brand for DOT4 or DOT 5.1 compaible Synth ?
 

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[line]The bottle on the left. I switched just because the synthetic dot 4 was far more available. I called as well as emailed the Castrol co. I received a response from both. And What I liked about this product was that you don't have to get every drop of the old stuff out of there. (impossible) But Castrol did recommend a full and thorough flush.....while maintaining that the product was fully compatible to "top off" existing non-synthetic fluid, they felt it best to replace all fluid completely.

I did not know that the synthetic is less damaging to the paint. It has been a few thousand miles for me now after replacement with nothing but great brake and clutch operation.


RED
 

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The reason they say to flush it is not a lack of compatability, but that you do not realize the 'full benefit' if it is mixed. I use the Valvoline DOT4 and am very happy with it. I did not know it was less threatening to paint. Good to know, though I hope not to test it.
 

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The reason they say to flush it is not a lack of compatability, but that you do not realize the 'full benefit' if it is mixed. I use the Valvoline DOT4 and am very happy with it. I did not know it was less threatening to paint. Good to know, though I hope not to test it.
 

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The reason they say to flush it is not a lack of compatability, but that you do not realize the 'full benefit' if it is mixed. I use the Valvoline DOT4 and am very happy with it. I did not know it was less threatening to paint. Good to know, though I hope not to test it.
 

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rpeters549 wrote:
The reason they say to flush it is not a lack of compatability, but that you do not realize the 'full benefit' if it is mixed. I use the Valvoline DOT4 and am very happy with it. I did not know it was less threatening to paint. Good to know, though I hope not to test it.
I flushed and refilled the systems on my VTX years ago and have had no problems with it and will do the same to the wing this winter.
 

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So what's the advantage of synthetic, besides not harming the finish? Does it not absord moisture like regular fluid.What's the real perk? :baffled:
 

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riffraff wrote:
So what's the advantage of synthetic, besides not harming the finish? Does it not absord moisture like regular fluid.What's the real perk? :baffled:
BINGO!!!!! No moisture hence no rust!!!!!!!!
 

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The problem with DOT5 (silicon) brake fluid is, in fact, that it does not absorb moisture.
For a daily rider, that's bad. The moisture in the air still gets into the brake system, and ends up accumulating at the low points. This causes corrosion. When it is kept in suspension, this does not occur as badly. You do need to change DOT3 and DOT4 every few years because it absorbs moisture, but it is safer for the brake system components. I did some research on switching and decided against it for this reason. If interested, I can find some of the information to this effect and post it.
 

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Here's an example of the info I found on Dot 5:

Current Synthetic is DOT 5.1 glycol, and Silicone Synthetic is DOT 5 and are not synonymous, silicone came out in the '80's, i.e. that purple GE stuff. It's very squishy (compressible, like soft jello; yes in a fluid) due to its easy and lasting aeration (bubbles) ability.

It was designed for museum cars that don't get much use, to keep the internal brake components from corroding because it doesn't absorb moisture. Problem is that in a street car then moisture buildup from outdoor exposure/use isn't absorbed, instead collecting and causing rust, along with the squishy issue affecting the ABS.

DOT 3/4/5.1 glycol fluids all absorb moisture in suspension, and need to be changed somewhat regularly (yearly) to prevent pedal failure due to the lowered boiling point allowing possible gasification in the caliper. All are mix compatible, just flush out most of the old fluid. Do NOT use ATE Blue (200 Gold instead) if you autocross in Stock class. Motul is fine but expensive. Anything under $12/litre like ATE is good.
 

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I agree with Pete on all his points. I had put synth. in my Harley and saw first hand the moisture accumulating. I was also told the synth would work on the rubber seals since the brake system was not designed for it. The last point could have been because this was several years ago and may not have been compatible. Nevertheless I won't mix fluids now except some oils.
I also when changing brake fluid will flush system with them new stuff to insure the old is mostly out. Yes, it may cost a little extra for the extra bottle, but most diy'rs spill nearly. that much. Plus the old is useful for soaking rusty tools and the like.
Oh, I use non-synth in my bikes now. I have done nothing with the 2010 yet.
 

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In my opinion, the clutch should be changed yearly anyway....and the brakes every few on a motorcycle. I installed the speed bleeders so this is very fast and easy for me. That said the information stated indicates moisture build up in all three fluids mentioned. The fact that it may pool up in low spots with the synthetics.......or just the normal non-synthetics sucking up moisture being left in the open air for too long.

With all the fluids on the shelf of local shops near me, I came up stubs finding the standard dot 4. Only reason I went the rout I did..... after some research. I do think the stuff I used is a better product then the standard dot4 as well.

RED


Thank you for contacting Castrol North America.


GT LMA combines both DOT 3 and DOT 4 performance and exceeds both specifications. It is compatible with conventional and synthetic products, and therefore could be used to "top" off, however we do not recommend mixing fluids.

Both DOT 3 and DOT 4 specifications call for glycol based brake fluid and address the fluid boiling point, pH, corrosion protection, stability, seal compatibility and anti-wear properties. The primary difference is with low temperature viscosity and the wet-dry boiling point. Compared to DOT 3, DOT 4 has a more stringent requirement for dry boiling point (446 degrees F versus 401 degrees F). DOT 3 performances requires greater fluidity or lower viscosity at low temperature.



Castrol Consumer Relations.
 

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so dot 3 may be better in a cold climate if I read this correctly due to lower viscosity and boiling point.
 

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The DOT-4 fluid is still hydrostatic (the Castrol, Valvoline, etc) so still will gather moisture. It's main advantage is in its higher wet boiling point. Momma Honda says to use DOT-4 anyway, so the synthetic vesion just gives a little higher temp protection. If it is less dmaging to paint also, awesome. All I can say is that all I have used is the synthetic DOT4 (primarily Valvoline) in temps from 110* down to about 8* last winter and all systems have worked flwlessly. Though I do flush in new yearly.
Why I am typing this I do not really know as others have already above. It's early.
 

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we like repeating ourselves
 

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we like repeating ourselves
 

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Me thinks that was a stab at my earlier triple post...

sorry to hijack
 
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