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:clapper:I am about to button bargoyle up and hit her with the fluids. I did all the o-rings, gaskets, and the timing belts. Napa was a good source for the belts.

I ran out of light tonite, but tomorrow evening...

I bought the silica free (highpriced) anti freeze for her, and am wondering about what oil I should put in. I am considering the synthetics, such as royal purple, and the shelfed sythetics at WalMart. Just for reference, Bargoyle is an 80 gl1100.

Do any of you have any experience or opinions on them?:clapper:
 

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Oh No... Not the QUESTION! Please noooooo....

This subject has been discussed ad nauseum! The consensus is that just about any good quality oil, dino or synthetic will do fine. The main consideration is that it should be changed often (how often is arguable) I do mine around 4000-5000 miles which is more often than Honda calls for. Some prefer 3000 miles. Regular changes of oil and filter is the key to longevity. One of the fluids a lot of folks forget is the brake and clutch fluid. It's a good idea tochange itannually as it has a tendency to absorb water in use which can corrode the systems.

 

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ubarw wrote:
I am about to button bargoyle up and hit her with the fluids. I did all the o-rings, gaskets, and the timing belts. Napa was a good source for the belts.

I ran out of light tonite, but tomorrow evening...

I bought the silica free (highpriced) anti freeze for her, and am wondering about what oil I should put in. I am considering the synthetics, such as royal purple, and the shelfed sythetics at WalMart. Just for reference, Bargoyle is an 80 gl1100.

Do any of you have any experience or opinions on them?
ubarw, that depends on what you expect from an oil. Basically any oil that meets Honda's specs will work. Some oil types have some advantages in certain areas.

Also keep in mind not all oil's with the words synthetic on them are actual PAO synthetic oil's, some of the lower priced synthetic oil's are just fossil oil that meets synthetic specs.

A true ground-up engineered synthetic oil is costly to manufacturer so any synthetic oil that is inexpensive is probably just a group 3 type oil that meets base synthetic specs.

Now on yourquestion: Seeing as you just did a lot of work on your bike & haven't tested it yet about any oil meeting Honda specs would be a good starting point. You really should drain that oil out after a few weeks anyhow to be sure you get all the dirt & unwanteds out. After the first oil/filter change would be a good time to switch to a good synthetic oil.

I think you will find that a good synthetic oil will allow the trans to shift a fair amount better & possibly lower the lifter noise a little due to allowing the use of a 15W50 oil in all ambient temperatures.

Synthetic oil's (well the better ones anyhow) hold their viscosity longer so are much better for use in internal transmission applications, don't boil off nearly as easily so tend to hold up better for longer periods of time, most flow better at cold temps so are better for an engine during cold starts. The down side is: they cost more (in some cases much more).

To find the best synthetic oil FOR YOUR APPLICATION you really need to do your homework & look at the test data sheets on all the oils you are considering using. Not all synthetic oil's are the same & in some cases not as good for certain applications as a good Dino oil (again depends on YOUR usage).

I personally use a synthetic oil in all my vehicles (except all my old tractors). I won't even try to recommend a type or brand to you as that can very greatly by expectations or usage but if you want to E-Mail me I can help you pick a good oil for YOUR application based on a weightedrating chart I have that plugs in all the parameters like price, HT/HS scores, pour points, Shear resistance, viscosity retention, etc.

Twisty
 

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let me see... differing opinions about oils.... no cannot happen.... now if you really want to stir up a debate... ask how many miles you can ride before the rider on the back needs to stop at a rest-room LOL... opps, at my age I am the one having to stop... LOL

for what it is worth I usually use mobil one or the castrol synthetic
 

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Iused Mobil 1 on the last bike and itis still going strong for the new owner at 137+ miles. So I will use it on this one. Just don't add any Teflon additives if you do you will need to replace the clutch.
 

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I'm beginning to wonder if putting Slick 50 or any of the supposedly super slick oils in a bike really will fry the clutch. A while back philcsand mentioned the previous owner of his bike had put Slick 50 in it. Phil didn't say anything about having clutch trouble. I never thought Slick 50 was much more than snake oil, the claims they make about how the stuff works always sounded liketoro merde to me. I'm also beginning to think the stories about clutches being ruined with that kind of stuff is also an old wives tale. I've never heard from someone who has had DIRECT experience of such. It's always second hand info. Sure wish I had an old bike to experiment on.
 

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Thats what my brother thought to. But he put in Slick 50 and with in 200 miles a previously functioning clutch began slipping bad. Honda mechanic at Gene's Galley in Springfield MO. said the slick 50 put a glaze on the clutch. He also said maybe the glaze could be removed but since we were down to that level might as well replace it. Maybe it was considence and the mechanic was full of it. But I think my wet clutch is going to be teflon free.
 

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Yeah that's the rub. To find out for sure you'd have to start out with a new clutch and see what happens. It's a little expensive just to satisfy my curiosity but philcsand's post has me wondering again.
 

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years ago... I think around 1979 I put a teflon additive into my '78... never affected the clutch...

but I do agree, the teflon additives are snake oil.... so just how is the teflon particles supposed to coat the metal..... Does anyone remember the jcwitney product that was supposed to recoat the cylinders in your old wore out can engine!

Stick with a high quality oil
 

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rcmatt007 wrote:
years ago... I think around 1979 I put a Teflon additive into my '78... never affected the clutch...

but I do agree, the Teflon additives are snake oil.... so just how is the Teflon particles supposed to coat the metal..... Does anyone remember the jcwitney product that was supposed to recoat the cylinders in your old wore out can engine!

Stick with a high quality oil
rcmatt007, the good thing about those Teflon additives are they never dissolve in the oil so the oil filter removes them pretty quickly. Moly would be a much worse addition & even then it hasn't been a proven problem as long as not added in very high concentrations.

Twisty
 

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exavid wrote:
I'm beginning to wonder if putting Slick 50 or any of the supposedly super slick oils in a bike really will fry the clutch. A while back philcsand mentioned the previous owner of his bike had put Slick 50 in it. Phil didn't say anything about having clutch trouble. I never thought Slick 50 was much more than snake oil, the claims they make about how the stuff works always sounded liketoro merde to me. I'm also beginning to think the stories about clutches being ruined with that kind of stuff is also an old wives tale. I've never heard from someone who has had DIRECT experience of such. It's always second hand info. Sure wish I had an old bike to experiment on.
Paul, it would depend on the amount of molybdenum in the Slick 50?

The problem with clutch slippage is it is very hard to detect as most people just don't ride that fast. In most cases clutch slippage isn't an issue until you try to drive a vehicle through the wind at high speeds with the engine running near top torque output. In some of the actual tests I have seen run the motorcycle is run at top speed & the RPM's noted then re-run with additives or moly added. Problem is there is always some slight clutch slippage it's just a matter of how much is harmful.

There have been numerous tests run on the amount of moly that canbe added before a clutch problem becomes an issue. There is actually data out there that supports both sides of the moly issue, so who knows. I like to err on the safe side & use low or no moly additive oil.

Twisty
 
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