Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Been thinking of buying a table lift. Any opinions on brands, features, etc would be great. Thought of building my own, but don't need another project. Obviously I don't want to break the bank, but I would like some bang for my buck. I know a guy that bought one from Harbor Freight and he really likes it. I've never been a huge fan of their stuff though. It won't be an everyday user, so maybe one of these would suffice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

Sometimes if you're patient, and browse through the CL listings for the areas your willing to travel, you can find a great deal on a used table made of far better quality.

I found my $650 Pitbull air actuated lift for $250 that way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
imported post

Yea, my thoughts exactly, but haven't found one yet after several months of on and off looking. I was hoping to come up with one for the winter. I'm usually not happy with the low quality stuff from Harbor. Northern Tools shows one that appears well built, but the price gets up there quick.

Do you like the Pitbull?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,076 Posts
imported post

The Harbor Freight tools one is real good and the price is right if you find the coupon in any bike mag its takes about 100 bucks off
 

·
Just another ORF!
Joined
·
8,189 Posts
imported post

I often toyed with the thought of buying a table lift and came oh so close to buying one when it was on sale, ( went in the back of the warehouse to examine it) but then the realization hit me that it would always be in the way, unless you either sunk it into the floor of your man cave, or had a dedicated bay for it's use. I would not be able to drive 'over' it with my van, because of the table's height (6 1/2" without the wheel vice/chalk)

I then considered building a knock down wooden work platform, that would knock down into 4 -5 manageable (read store-able) pieces, similar to this one I borrowed from a friend. All I'd have to buy is the plywood and hardware, as that same friend offered me all the rough lumber I'd need to build the framing (Cabinet maker)







Having usedhis for a while, I havereconfigured my original 'design' so that it would be more suitable for my own purposes, but Inever have got off my arse to build it. (
Imay yet, though, :baffling: as it would be very inexpensive to do so)

IF I were going to buy a commercially produced lift, I'd go with the Pitbull, with the option swivel turntable. Easy access to 90%+ of the bike, easy tire changes, easy to change position/location/direction of the bike, so you can turn the bike around in a very small 'footprint' to remove bike easily and it takes up less valuable 'real estate' in a small shop, as it stows away easily, making it possible to store/work onmy van inside the shop, if need be.

Just my thoughts. :? ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
imported post

here is an option I saw in Daytona:

This is what they asked for it:

And this is who is selling it:

It looked good and I thought I share, I really want one too but it's not in the budget right now...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
imported post

Great input, thank you, I have a fairly large shop so space isn't a huge concern. I like the ones with casters on them because in my case, I have an 82 Interstate I would like to refurbish. The bike will be on the stand for some time. (in my case probably years document.write('/forums/images/emoticons/extrasmilies/smiler.gif');
). It would be nice to roll it out of the way when I'm not working on it. I also have a few ATV's so it would be nice for it to do double duty, but that is not a main factor. The wings are my main reason.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,250 Posts
imported post

Kimswang wrote:
here is an option I saw in Daytona
That looks a lot like a Harbor Freight lift with a wheel vise and an air lift system.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,775 Posts
imported post

I noticed the same thing. My only complaint on the HF lifts are they are too narrow. Doing a 1500 by yourself is a challenge & not really recommended.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
87 Posts
imported post

I bought one from HF and added the plywood top and made a little heavier

clamp for the front tire
 

·
Administrator
02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
Joined
·
60,203 Posts
imported post

Okay, you guys got me to thinking about this Table Lift thing.

1) because I have to have one muy pronto.
2) I am retired and out of money.
3) what do you think of this idea?

Was reading the forum tonight and this thread got started on Table Lifts.

Then I gelled it all down to something like this. What do you think?



2x4 lumber box measuring 4 ft wide by 8 ft long. Use 3 each 2x4's lengthwise, so you have one down the center. Then you top it off with 3/4 plywood. Give it a coat or three of Thompson's weather-seal.

Bolt on a front tire bracket from Harbor Freight or just build one.

You now have a platform that the bike can be rode up on top of. Some well placed deck anchors that go flush with the floor, or just use some heavy eye-bolts horizontal through the 2x4's on the outside edges; these tie downs will secure the bike so that it stays in place.

Okay, now we have the bike tied down to a platform that is only 3-1/2 inches off the floor. Looks pretty, but let's get it up in the air.

Mount 4 each, 1/2 eye-bolts, one at each corner on the sides.

Now you mount a winch motor in the rafters that runs a long arbor with pulleys on it. Need 4 pulleys. From each pulley you run aircraft cable along the rafters to a point above where the lift table is going to be used.

Now you secure the axle/pulleys in the proper position to be directly over each appropriate eye-bolt.

Now you plug in the winch motor and flip a switch. The table goes up in the air until it is high enough for the legs to be pushed underneath the box. Reverse the motor, let the table down and it sits on the legs. Remove the cables and tie them up out of the way.

Time to do a PM on the bike, and for a lot less money than most table lifts. Storage? Just hang the table on the wall and be done with it, or just let the winch haul it up to the ceiling completely out of the way.


Don't have a winch motor? Just use a hand operated boat winch to turn the overhead arbor/pulley scheme.
 

·
Just another ORF!
Joined
·
8,189 Posts
imported post

Sounds pretty complicated to me, John :?



Here's a rough Paint rendering I did today in between other things I was doing. Still in the very rough idea stage, but you get the idea.

96"L X 32"W X 20"H.Built using1"x5" rough lumber and a sheet of 3/4" ply.Maybe acouple of joist hangers to hold some 2x for the cross bracing underneath the middle to help prevent any 'sag'. You'd need another sheet of ply, a couple of steel ramp plates and a couple of 2x8sto make the ramp to get it up on there. It would all knock down into 5 pieces to make storage a lot easier

Like I said, still in the rough stage with no exact measurements.and not 'drawn' to scale





Seeing as I would get all the rough 1 x 5 for free, total cost for me would be well under $100
 

·
Administrator
02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
Joined
·
60,203 Posts
imported post

Ken,

The whole point of my exercise was to eliminate the ramp and the necessity of getting the bike up onto something that high. That is just an accident waiting to happen.

By just having a very low table top that sits flush on the ground, you only have a ramp that is 3.5 inches high.

The cables and arbor to wind them up is nothing more than mimicking a garage door opener. Simple, sturdy, and very reliable.

The pulleys in my case would be nothing more than a piece of 1" conduit setting in a couple of arbor block bearings. A second arbor identical to the first for the front of the table, and a 3rd arbor for the back of the table.

Very little torque would be required to wind up the cables. Hand winch it, or use a junk electric motor geared way down. The legs for me would be concrete blocks. Easy to store, and easy to move around.

Cost would be minimal, and storage would be a breeze.

I am not even going to attempt to run a bike up/dn a ramp 24" high or more. It is bad enough in my trailer which is wider and has sides on it to keep one from falling off of it.

A platform without sides? No thank you.

Now if someone just donated a hydraulic or air lift table to me, well, that would be different.
---------------

An alternative that I have thought of, is to lift one end of the table at a time with a hydraulic floor jack. Block it and lift the other end. Do that twice and it is up to the right height.

Lots of ways to do a thing, I will be scouring the sales ads around the area all winter. Never know what will turn up cheap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,790 Posts
imported post

John , I like your idea . My only concern is , will the truss system support half ton hanging from it . I understand the loading is only momentary . Lift the bike ,set on blocks , relax cable load . As space is a premium ,winching the table up for storage is a great idea .

More thoughts . The truss will have about 250 lbs at each corner so the loading is spread a bit ,but still a concern to me .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,148 Posts
imported post

OnaWingandaPrayer wrote:
John , I like your idea . My only concern is , will the truss system support half ton hanging from it . I understand the loading is only momentary . Lift the bike ,set on blocks , relax cable load . As space is a premium ,winching the table up for storage is a great idea .

More thoughts . The truss will have about 250 lbs at each corner so the loading is spread a bit ,but still a concern to me .
I agree, I would also be concerned about hanging that much weight from the ceiling rafters. Thats a lot of weight. If that's an issue you can beef up the support.

But I also worry that once you start lifting, you now have a 1000# swing hanging from the overhead. It's not like a garage lift where the platform rides up tracks. Hanging it from 4 cables will allow a lot of play.

I know when my garage door opens, it doesn't always go up perfectly even. Sometimes one side shfts higher than the other, just by a quarter or half inch or so, as it moves up the tracks. If any one corner of your lift shifted even a little bit, the entire thing could become unstable.

On the other hand, it could work perfectly. But it's an awful risk to test it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,148 Posts
imported post

I have one of the Harbor Freight table lifts.



In fact, I have a lift and a jack. I find that I use my jack more often than my lift, because it is easier to set up and work with, but there are some jobs that the table is better for.



Storage is a problem. It's in the way in the garage when I'm not using it. And it usually ends up having a bunch of stuff piled on it. In the end, when I need to use it, it usually ends up taking half an hour to clear it off so that I can start working.

Also, once it's loaded with weight, it can't be moved around like a jack can. So once you lift the bike, it's in one spot until bring the bike back down.

But, that being said, it has been a really valuable asset. I've gotten a lot of use out of it.

Lifting a Goldwing requires some special effort because the lift is narrow. On the 1200 I could put down the side stand, but on the 1500 I can't, so I have to be prepared to get it on the centerstand directly. This requres something to stand on.

Also it's not long enough use the removable rear plate, so I modified mine. (Lots of people I talk to make similar modifications for the same reason.)



I have a webpage with pictures and descriptions of mine.



http://www.hrot.org/martino/goldwing/lift/
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top