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I've decided to embark on a new career as a tent camper...About a million years ago I was a boy scout, but most of that training has long since been forgotten.. I need a suggestion on what type of tent to buy...ie....one or 2 person pup tent...that can be strapped on the bike?? I'm looking for something decent...not overly expensive..
 

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Long term tent camper, me....... and I've got a few suggestions:

First, carry the biggest tent you can. Small size and compactness is attractive, until being inside "small and compact" during a three day rainstorm. If at all possible, I'd suggest a four-person tent for two, and a two-person tent for one. My opinion only, of course......

Specific models:

Eureka Timberlines, 2-person or 4-person, $160, Campmor

R.E.I. Half-Dome, 2-person, $160, R.E.I.

A medium priced backpacking tent is sufficient; 4-season tents or mountaineering tents are overkill.... unless you are trying to get your Goldwing up the Northeast Ridge of Mt. Everest......

(Eureka Timberline 4, alonside the Clearwater River, Idaho)
 

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Eureka Timberline tents are great. I've worn out 3 of them over the years. They're roomy, have a great rain fly, and very importantly they are quick and easy to set up.

I'm using a smaller Eureka backpacking tent right now but my next tent will be a Timberline.

Q
 

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Cousin Jack hit the big one. I've seen so many people who went with the smallest tent (cheapest) tent they could get. They paid for it when they had to spend more than one night in it, there was no room, it got damp and everything got wet.

My advise is to look at it from the reverse direction, not the smallest you can strap on, but rather the biggest...... NO JOKES.

Myself, I have a large tent that has both a cabin and a netted dining area. It's a bit cumbersum, but it allows me a place to get the bike out of the rain as well without having to carry a cover for it. Also it allows me to keep to keep it secure if I'm in an area where I have reason to worry about someone messing with it.

Whatever you get, waterproof it with a good silcone spray every year, it's a quick job and a small investment to stay dry.
 

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Although I didn't pose the question, thanks for the advice. I was looking at a 2 man tent for 2 people. Had decided to spend in the 150 range for a decent one. I'll do some measuring and figure out what I can safely carry.:action::action:
 

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Don't forget the airmatress!!! Our old bones just don't like laying on the cold hard ground. :baffled:

I think that after just one or two trips you'll start catching on as far as what to take and what to leave at home.
 

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Cousin Jack wrote:
Long term tent camper, me....... and I've got a few suggestions:

First, carry the biggest tent you can. Small size and compactness is attractive, until being inside "small and compact" during a three day rainstorm. If at all possible, I'd suggest a four-person tent for two, and a two-person tent for one. My opinion only, of course......

Specific models:

Eureka Timberlines, 2-person or 4-person, $160, Campmor

R.E.I. Half-Dome, 2-person, $160, R.E.I.

A medium priced backpacking tent is sufficient; 4-season tents or mountaineering tents are overkill.... unless you are trying to get your Goldwing up the Northeast Ridge of Mt. Everest......

(Eureka Timberline 4, alonside the Clearwater River, Idaho)
:coollep:Could not have said it better, when they tell you 2 man that's about all that you will get in it. Remember you will need to put a sleeping bag and a sleeping pad or matress of some kind in there to. Unless you have a place to stow your gear outside it's not going to fit inside.

Just some tips from a long time camper

:11brown:Winger 82
 

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We use a trailer so our carrying space is a bit more. We have a 6 person Coleman cabin tent. It takes a bit more to set up and take down but we like it a lot. We use cots for sleeping so the straight walls were important. There is also room for us to sit inside in lawn chairs if the weather is in an uncooperative mood. It has been through some nasty thunder storms and never got wet inside. We used it over 3 days that were raining most of the time and it stayed warm and dry inside.

No doubt it is way easy to get a tent too small. Keep in mind when they say sleeps 2 they mean just exactly that, You can sleep 2 people but that is if they are not large people, and are very friendly. That leaves no room for bags, or other gear. If you are going with 2 people a 4 person tent is the absolute minimum I would consider.
 

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Good venting that will also keep those vicious mosquitoes Out :waving:
 

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Before I'd worry about a tent and camping gear, I'd go buy some clothes........
 

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Foodman wrote:
Before I'd worry about a tent and camping gear, I'd go buy some clothes........
:cheeky1:
 

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And that air mattress will suck the heat right outta yer bones. So blankets - lotsa blankets - is a MUST. Take it from a frostbitten Michigander.
 

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Foodman wrote:
Before I'd worry about a tent and camping gear, I'd go buy some clothes........
You make a very good point! Clothes first and then a tent..
Thanks
Chester Gunn/Chula, GA
 

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Richardrwg wrote:
Cousin Jack hit the big one. I've seen so many people who went with the smallest tent (cheapest) tent they could get. They paid for it when they had to spend more than one night in it, there was no room, it got damp and everything got wet.

My advise is to look at it from the reverse direction, not the smallest you can strap on, but rather the biggest...... NO JOKES.

Myself, I have a large tent that has both a cabin and a netted dining area. It's a bit cumbersum, but it allows me a place to get the bike out of the rain as well without having to carry a cover for it. Also it allows me to keep to keep it secure if I'm in an area where I have reason to worry about someone messing with it.

Whatever you get, waterproof it with a good silcone spray every year, it's a quick job and a small investment to stay dry.
Do you have pictures? The wife and I tour the US and I pull a Bushtec trailer so I think the tent yor using would be no problem carrying. I like the idea about covering the bike.
 

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When looking at the size of the tent, and you are looking at how many it will sleep, remember no human sleeps in the positions listed on the box. (Unless the are very intimate with each other)


Kevin E
 

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Panatellos wrote:
When looking at the size of the tent, and you are looking at how many it will sleep, remember no human sleeps in the positions listed on the box. (Unless the are very intimate with each other)


Kevin E
:baffled:I thought that was the point!!:cheeky1:

If I'm camping with Nancy, I don't mind her being close...

If I'm camping with a bunch of guys, they better have their own tent!! :cheeky1:
 

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Panatellos wrote:
When looking at the size of the tent, and you are looking at how many it will sleep, remember no human sleeps in the positions listed on the box. (Unless the are very intimate with each other)


Kevin E
Well I guess I better buy a bigger tent! Melissa snores way too much for me to be intimate with her.:cheeky1:
 

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:D A-Men on there owntent :shock:
 

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One of the most important points in buying a tent, for me, is getting one tall enough to stand up in. Hatehaving topullon my jeans all hunched over.
 

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bel25455 wrote:
Richardrwg wrote:
Cousin Jack hit the big one. I've seen so many people who went with the smallest tent (cheapest) tent they could get. They paid for it when they had to spend more than one night in it, there was no room, it got damp and everything got wet.

My advise is to look at it from the reverse direction, not the smallest you can strap on, but rather the biggest...... NO JOKES.

Myself, I have a large tent that has both a cabin and a netted dining area. It's a bit cumbersum, but it allows me a place to get the bike out of the rain as well without having to carry a cover for it. Also it allows me to keep to keep it secure if I'm in an area where I have reason to worry about someone messing with it.

Whatever you get, waterproof it with a good silcone spray every year, it's a quick job and a small investment to stay dry.
Do you have pictures? The wife and I tour the US and I pull a Bushtec trailer so I think the tent yor using would be no problem carrying. I like the idea about covering the bike.
I'm sure I do somewhere, let me see what I can find. It may take awhile, I'm still unpacking and missing things from moving here last year.
 
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