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I've been really fortunate, everytime I've let my 1200 rest, the only person who had a camera was me. :baffled:

And I'm not going to take a photo of my own bike laying over on her side.:cheeky1:

Oh that's right, I should have said "if I ever let my 1200 fall over". Right, CJ?
 

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chesterwgunn wrote:
I've decided to embark on a new career as a tent camper.............. I need a suggestion on what type of tent to buy...ie....one or 2 person pup tent...that can be strapped on the bike?? I'm looking for something decent...not overly expensive..

I'd suggest that you each have 1 saddlebag each, for your own personal gear/clothes/rain gear(and tool kit) The top case for camping gear. If you have a trunk rack, I'd suggest this trunk bag It's very good value for the money.

http://www.303products.com/tech/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID=428&CFID=45746290&CFTOKEN=47633078



I'd also suggest buying a good, appropriately sized,compression stuff sac, along the lines as this to put your tent/fly/footprint/ground cloth in and reduce it's size bulk, such as the blue bag with the black end caps,on the right hand side of the table, below ....




which holds this 4 man tent ....



saving you much needed space. My poles fit in the trunk.

On a bike, riding 2 up, with no trailer, you have to think compact!



Dusty
 

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Dusty,,,, where do you pack the tent(in the stuff sack)on the bike? And where on the bike is your sleeping bag?

And whats in the trunk bag?

I did alright with the packing for my first trip,,,,,, but there is always room for improvement.
 

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Winger77 wrote:
Dusty,,,, where do you pack the tent (in the stuff sack)on the bike? And where on the bike is your sleeping bag?

And whats in the trunk bag?

I did alright with the packing for my first trip,,,,,, but there is always room for improvement.

Well Dave, for the Calhoun trip, Ipacked way more than I usually do, mainly due to the fact that I was going to be on the road for over a month, all over the continent(22 States and 1 Province) and in mid-late fall(Sept20 - Oct 25)





All my camping gear(including tent/footprint/water storage container/sleeping bag/sleeping mat/air bed/tarp and cord/stove/pots/large pillow/colder weather insulated-waterproof jacket/down vest/utensils kit and more!)was in the pack behind me, on the passenger/pillion seat

In the trunk rack bag, I carried riding gear(extra armoured jacket/liner, armoured riding pants/liner, gloves, 2 carton of smokes, MapBook and when space allowed(depending on what jacket I was wearing) the tripod were inside the main compartment. I had my LED headlamp, candle lantern, DC-AC power inverter, chargers and cables for all my electronic gear, spare AA rechargeable batteries, plus battery charger, among other items in the side pockets. In the rear pocket of the trunk rack bag, I had current state map and useful brochure(s) obtained from Visitor Centres, spare green garbage bag and 2 medium sized 'kitchen catcher' trashbags.


The trunk rack bag weighed between 15 - 25lbs, depending on what riding gear I was wearing.

In the pic below, you can see that I had added a set of 1800 trunk rack risers to help 'spread the load/weight distribution on the lid of the trunk. I had to drill out the risers big enough for the 6m rack bolts to fit through, to attach the trunk rack. I also added extra rubber washers on both sides of the trunk, fender washers on theundersideand some tap washers, that fit between the risers and the rackto help eliminate cracks in the lid. It' seems to be working alright, as there are no signs of cracking after 40,000k





This trip, I'll be taking my 'ultra light' backpacking gear. I'll be able to fit the tent,insulated sleeping pad, 9.5'x13' tarp, -12*C down sleeping bag, stove/fuel/pot easily into one saddle bag.

Here's my 2 man tent, which has 2 doors/vestibules, yet weighs only 42ozs and packs up to the size of a volleyball,without the use of a compression sac! ;)



Dusty
 

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Also get a good air mattress, they take up some room but after sleeping on the ground a couple of times, youwill appreciate a good air mattress. My brother and I rode and camped for about 15 years and loved every minute of it.

Your Friend,

John D.
 

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Thanks Ken,,,,,(I think it's Ken) -(please correct me) you covered that question for me quite well.

I had my clothes in my pack on the back seat. Tent,poles, sleep mat, mat inflator, hachet, tarp, Atlas,2 other books and maybe a couple other small items I can't think of. This was all in my trunk.

Stove, gas for stove, small lunch pale type cooler, tools, bag for camera & GPS, spare twine, Bear spray, and again items I can't think of,,,,,,,all in the Left saddle bag.

Sleeping bag, smokes, small broom & dust pan, plexus & rags, other small items. All in Right saddle bag. The sleeping bag took most of the space here.

On the trunk rack I kept the folding chair,compact tripodand a stuff sack for jackets & chaps.

I should add,,,,,,,,,,, I pack all my clothes in 2 1/2 gallon zip baggies. I took too much clothes, so I think I can use the space for other items next time.
 

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:coollep:You'll catch on real quick on what you really need to take and what you can get by on and still be comfortable

:11brown::action:
 

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Winger 82 wrote:
:coollep:You'll catch on real quick on what you really need to take and what you can get by on and still be comfortable

:11brown::action:
I know what ya mean. The inflatable sleep mat is a must.

Hey,,,,, is Meadville near Pittsburg???
 

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Sleeping bags can be quite bulky, especially synthetic ones.

My -3*Cdown backpacking bag packs smaller than a volleyball, when in a compression sac and weighs just 25ozs.

I'll be bringing a new -12*C bag I just picked up, although it's bulkier and heavier. I haven't had a chance to weigh it on my digital scales yet, but I know I could use it well into winter. :cooldevil: I use a digital scale and a spreadsheet program for all my backpacking gear, so I can keep track of how much weight I'll be carrying on a backpacking trip. It's great that my backpacking gear does double duty for motorcycle camping.





Packing too many clothes is common and not hard to do, especially when you are covering a lot of different latitudes, altitudes and a vast temperature range, in the shoulder seasons. You need something warm for sitting around the ole campsite, at night. :grinner:

One of these days I should take photos of all the gear/camping gear I normally use, where I pack it, show it in useand report back. :gunhead:


Cheers, Ken
 

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Hey, you guys are AWSOME, thanks. I can see right now that the compression sac is going to be as good a friend to me as the AIR MATTRESS is... I had no idea you could get THAT much gear on a bike, but were gonna give it a try, I may make several dry runs before Montrose though, THAT REALLY BREAKS MY HART..................
 

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I packed my bike several different times just to see how stuff would fit. When you do that, you'll figure out the things you don't really need. And there's always a Wal-Mart around every corner.

And the only thing I needed when I got out there, was another SD card and the compact tripod.:blowingup:
 

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Dusty Boots is a wealth of information for even the experienced and established tent campers on this forum. Red and Iare beginning to thinkhard about regearing,because we've gone to a lighter, more responsive, but more space-restrictive bike. I refuse to look at motels, instead we're lookingat all the space-saving ideas: less clothing, smaller tent (aaarrgh!), compression sacks, down maybe instead of synthetic -- we're even talking of taking just one rectangular sleeping bagzipped flat and placed on top for two people, replacing the bottom bag with a simple sleep sack........ such thinking engages the old brain! It's a fun challenge, trying to do more and more with less and less. Thank you, Dusty for some great ideas for old tent rats!

But now I think I've found an add-on cordura pack for my sportstourer that may solve all our problems, and even provide a back rest for Red. We're thinking our old tent and tarps across the back, and two sleeping bags in compression sacks on the ends. I'll use my revamped Firecreek tankbagforour kitchen.... don't know where I'll put my plasma screen tv and laptop, however!

:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:

Here come Mr. and Mrs. CJ! Swift, silent, deadly, and with all their spare underwear stuffed into the pockets of their riding coats!

:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:

http://www.josupac.com/descrip.html
 

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To carry gear that needs to be kept dry and has to be 'lashed' on the bike,there's always the option of using one of these, or something like this, either alone, or in conjunction with that rear bag set-up, Mel. :baffled:



Dusty
 

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Thought about the dri-bags, and even have one already..... but the U-shaped cordura bag appeals to me for some reason.... mainly because I can have all the camp gear concentrated in one bag, whichbeeasily brought out from the "camp stuff store place" in our exercise room and quickly strapped down.... then off you go! It's also easily dismountable and brought inside when we do motel it.With the detachable sidecases and the u-bag, only two trips and I've got everything off the bike and inside..... would work when we tent, too......

I love the ST1300. In many ways she's the perfect bike, but not the ideal two-up camping platform I have to admit. But simplicity in itself is attractive to me these days..... going far with little, that's my ideal! And on the ST, going with little is the only option....

Funny how things change.... back in the days when dinosaurers roamed the earth. Red and I toured on a Suzuki 750 GS!Don't know how we did it! Leather jackets fromSears, blue jeans, army boots! Rain gear? Naw, we'd just hide outunder a bridge, or get wet! I remember I'd strap one sleeping bag w/stuff sack to the front forks! Musta seen too many "Here Comes Bronson" episodes....! Went all the way up the Icefield Parkway that way.... we were so enchanted by the Canadian Rockies we didn't even notice the discomfort.......
 

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The Big Dog wrote: ....I can see right now that the compression sac is going to be as good a friend to me as the AIR MATTRESS is... I had no idea you could get THAT much gear on a bike, but were gonna give it a try,.................









Big Dog ..... Although an air mattress/bed is thick(>7") and 'comfy', they are that only with warm nights!!!! Read >50*F Any cooler(and the nights in Montrose will be cooler due to altitude) they rob you of heat, as they are uninsulated.

To help combat this, you need to add quite a few additional blankets/sleeping bags/liners, etc,, which adds more bulk, requiring more room.

Also,most require a pump of some kind(most likely a 12V, which again gobbles up more valuable space)So you see, it compounds the space limitations of a bike. :headbanger:

I highly recommend getting an insulated sleeping PAD!

INSULATED SLEEPING PADS:

Best 'economical' choices that are rather comfortable(2 1/2" thick),will still keep you warm(insulated) AND TAKE UP VERY LITTLE SPACE ARE:

!) the Pacific Outdoor Equipment Ether Thermo 6

2) the Big Agnes Insulated Air Core

Both of these pads require you to inflate them by mouth, but will take you less than 2 minutes, usually requiring 11-14 fairly deep breathes to fully inflate.

The POE pad has an excellent 'track record' for durability, while the Big Agnes had some 'issues' with leaky valves, but have been reportedly 'fixed' by the manufacturer. Both of these pads can be purchased from REI(outstanding customer satisfaction guarantee!) but you may be able to find a cheaper price, elsewhere on the Internet. Make sure you order the model(s) above, as there are othermodelsmade by both manufacturers, that are NOT INSULATED!!!

There are 'pad connectors'(straps) available that connect your pads, side by side and take up very little room and are quite inexpensive.

TENTS:

Look at tents the same way you would a house. A cheap house/shelter/tent is just that - CHEAP , so don't expect a cheap shelter to keep you dry and stand up to winds the way a moderately priced tent will.

Look for a tent that is constructed with decent materials. Aluminum poles are stronger and lighter than fibreglass poles. Look for a 'fly sheet'(the outside covering) that comes to, or close to the ground, protecting you from wind blown rain. Make sure your prospective tent is big enough for you(both)with enough room to move around and get changed in.Make sure that the tent is long enough for you and your 'sleeping style', so your sleepingbag/head doesn't touch the tent walls, or else your bag will get wet from either condensation or if it is raining. Get right in there and make sure it's long enough! A tent with low, sloping walls, has a lot of 'unusable' space, due to the above. Also a tent with a square, or rectangular floor, will give you more usable floor space than one the is 6/8 sided.

Tents that employ 'clips' allow for easier and quicker set up, than those with sleeves. Important if you are erecting your tent and it's pouring rain out! :shock:

2 doors will allow you to enter/exit the tent, without having to climb over your partner.

A tent with a vestibule over each door will provide you with a sheltered area to store some gear. Make sure the design of the vestibule(s) does not allow rain to enter the inside of a tent, when entering/exiting your tent.

Most tent manufacturers also offer a custom 'footprint(ground cloth) for your model of tent. These help to preserve the floor from stones sticks etc and retain it's water proofness, longer. It should also be a couple inches 'shorter' than your tent floor's dimensions, so rain will not run on top of it, getting trapped between it and your tent's floor and leak through.

Better quality tents already come 'seam sealed', usually with some clear 'tape'. I still seal the fly/floor seams, by hand, using a good quality seam sealer, such as McNett Seam Grip seam sealer(highly recommended sealer!) You spread this along the seams on the outside of you fly seams, or on the inside ofthe floor seams with a 'flux brush]. Enough to cover all the stitching/threads, but not too thick. Let dry. Then sprinkle that with a bit of talc to remove the 'stickiness', or else the sealed seams will be tacky and want to stick to other bits of the tent material, when folded/rolled up. 2 tubes should be enough to do an average size(2-3 man) tent and fly.

Polyester fly materials(while not quite as strong as nylon), resist the sun's harmful UV rays better than nylon and because of it's chemical composition, are inherently more water repellent.

A 'decent' tent will run you in excess of $125, but will reward you with a long life, if treated with respect and not put away wet(mildew)

Unfortunately, most tents come equipped with near useless tent stakes/pegs. A lot of camp sites are on what are called 'improved', or 'hardened' campsites. Fancy term for packed 'chip' gravel and these stakes/pegs will bend quite easily, as you try to set them in the ground. Some people use galvanized 6"-10" 'spikes' , but are sometimes hard to remove . Over my years of tenting in various locations, I have found the MSR Ground Hog stakes to work the best and have a short length of reflective cord to make removing them easier. Because of their design, they also hold better than almost any other peg I've tried, even in sand.



SLEEPING BAGS:

Warmest/lightest/most compact sleeping bag is one that has down insulation. PERIOD !!!!

All this warmth/compactness does come with a price though. - Don't allow it to get wet! If your down sleeping bag becomes wet, it becomes very flat /matted and provides no insulating properties at all!


It is not that difficult to keep your down bag dry though, if you keep it sheltered from the rain, in a waterproof stuff sac(maybe enclosed in a heavy plastic trash bag)and off of your tent walls, while sleeping(see tentsabove)

A quality, properly sized compression stuff sac will shrink the size of your down sleeping bag to unbelievable small size. Just be sure and not leave your down bag(or any sleeping bag for that matter) shrunk down in a compression sac any longer than needed, as it will result in lost loft(>loft=>warmth) and damage the fragile plumells of down. When you get home after a trip, store your bag out of the stuff sac. There are large cotton sacs/bags that are quite inexpensive, to store your sleeping bag in and ensure a long life for you bag, resulting in greater longevity over a cheaper(bulkier/heavier) synthetic sleeping bag, making the down bag a better 'investment' in the long run

Look for a bag with a 'temperature rating' of 10* colder,than what you think you will encounter on your trip

For more information on camping gear, some of the better Online Outdoors gear stores(such as REI, MEC) have a section to educate the consumer as what to look for in 'proper' outdoor gear.

Educate yourself and become an informed consumer!

http://www.rei.com/expertadvice

http://www.mec.ca/Main/explore.jsp;jsessionid=214gJnqCB3zGnXjXxyvDWhvXF4ghdQdrrJyDrcz5yYmd6shmjnMl!1743338184?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302881695&bmUID=1231956706690



Cheers, Ken
 

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Dusty Boots, You my friend are a very valuable man, its like having my own guide to, well, almost anything. Thanks Ken
Dawson
 

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Winger77 wrote:
Winger 82 wrote:
:coollep:You'll catch on real quick on what you really need to take and what you can get by on and still be comfortable

:11brown::action:
I know what ya mean. The inflatable sleep mat is a must.

Hey,,,,, is Meadville near Pittsburg???
Winger 77,

Yeah I'm about 100 miles North of Pitts. and 35-40 miles South of Erie Pa.

:11brown:Winger 82:toast:
 

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'This will give you an idea of what my 'Light n Fast' set-up looks like, compared to a 1L drinking bottle. The use of a couple of compression sacs shrinks things down considerably.

The blue bag on the left holds my down sleeping bag(good for at least -12*C) The silvery one, centre left,holds my 2 man tent. Next is my 2 1/2" thick insulated air pad, followed by my 'kitchen'. Total weight is 4100g/144.640z and fits easily in one saddlebag.





More pics and details here - http://www.flickr.com/photos/dusty-boots/sets/72157612567549673/show/



Dusty
 

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Dusty,,,,,, you really go out of your way to help sometimes. But I get the feeling you get lots of enjoyment out of doing it;).

I might have to think about a more compact sleeping bag,,,,,,,,,,,, maybe.
 

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If it helps, ....... a lot of people I know on different backpacking forums, think that the Campmor 20* down bag is a good buy/compromise between warmth/quality, compactness and price($119.99) Never tried/seen one myself, but that's the 'buzz' that's been going on for the past 3 years of a decent bag for a good price.



Ya, I like to help out, where I can. I hate to see people throw their money away on inferior/inadequate gear, only to have it fail on them andleave them with a bad 'outdoor experience', never wanting to try it again, because of that. Make an informed purchase and you'll be rewarded with decent gear that won't let you down, if you use it within it's design limitations. A modest outlay for decent gear will serve/reward you a long time. :goofygrin:

I love the outdoors and like to see others enjoy it as well and what better way than to camp. :baffled: :coollep:




Dusty
 
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