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Twisty,

while reading through some posts the other day, I ran across where you had posted the following info concerning the clunky sound while shifting.

Prior to the shift, place your foot tight to the shift lever & apply as much pressure as you can without actually shifting,, then as you throttle back & de-clutch it will slide into the next gear so sweet you will think it's a Harley.. With a little practice that preloading the shift lever can get you a very nice shift..

I went out today for a ride and did exactly as you had stated. WOW!!! I could not believe the difference. No more CLUNK!!!! It took several shifts to get it where it was nice and smooth but I eventually got it. Thanks for the great advice.

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Nice one Chris. It takes a little while to get used to doing it that way. Some owners say this puts a load on the shifter drum, but I never heard of anyone breaking gears or forks by pre-loading the gears this way.
 

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1984GL1200A wrote:
Twisty,

while reading through some posts the other day, I ran across where you had posted the following info concerning the clunky sound while shifting.

Prior to the shift, place your foot tight to the shift lever & apply as much pressure as you can without actually shifting,, then as you throttle back & de-clutch it will slide into the next gear so sweet you will think it's a Harley.. With a little practice that preloading the shift lever can get you a very nice shift..

I went out today for a ride and did exactly as you had stated. WOW!!! I could not believe the difference. No more CLUNK!!!! It took several shifts to get it where it was nice and smooth but I eventually got it. Thanks for the great advice.

1984GL1200A , yes, that is my post but I'm just the messenger. I actually learned that from a fellow Winger here. Sure Wish I could remember who so I could credit him..

Twisty
 

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I read this right before heading out on a run. I thought how much difference could this possibly make - was I ever wrong!! Compared to how I used to shift it was like night and day. Twisty - you have my thanks and old whats her name's too! :clapper::clapper::clapper:



Do you have anymore tips? You sure taught this old dog a new trick. With this smooth shifting I feel like I should easily get an extra 100K out of the old girl (my wing that is)

Thanks again

Mike
 

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Floating the gears do any harm on a goldwing? be interesting to find out from some of these guys that know the inner workings of these transmissions. Hammer
 

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Ya know, I too read that "tip" and tried it.the "wing"does shift much quieter and seems to feel better going into gear.

I am not too worried about the negative effects of applying pressure to the shift forks or the drum. I look at it this way, that "clunk" cant be too good either

All my other bikes are motocrossers and the tranny's feel totally different than the "wing" so I really have no way to know what the "wing" should feel like. I think its worth mentioning that I do some pretty nasty things to my motocrossers when riding, including no clutch shifting, and stomping the snot out of the shift lever and have never had any shift fork or drum issues with them. therefore I will assume unless someone can say otherwise, that the shift "preload" wont be harmful to the "wing"

just my 2 cents worth:grinner:
 

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A way to shift a Gold Wing without placing any preload on the transmission is to match the engine speed to the road speed. What this means is that as you shift up in gears you must lower the engine speed by rolling off the throttle after you disengage the clutch. If you keep the RPM's up the transmission will almost always clunk when shifting, but if the engine RPM drops to the matching road speed it will shift smooth as silk. The same goes for downshifting, when you shift to a lower gear you need to bring the RPM's up to match the road speed. Once you learn how to do this properly on your Wing you will be amazed at how smoothly and easily it shifts.

The biggest benefit to matching engine speed to road speedis that it minimizes transmissionwear dramatically as opposed to preloading. Anytime you induce extra pressure on metal to metal parts you create extra heat, wear and potential premature failure of components.

Vic
 

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liquidplumber wrote:
Ya know, I too read that "tip" and tried it.the "wing"does shift much quieter and seems to feel better going into gear.

I am not too worried about the negative effects of applying pressure to the shift forks or the drum. I look at it this way, that "clunk" cant be too good either

All my other bikes are motocrossers and the tranny's feel totally different than the "wing" so I really have no way to know what the "wing" should feel like. I think its worth mentioning that I do some pretty nasty things to my motocrossers when riding, including no clutch shifting, and stomping the snot out of the shift lever and have never had any shift fork or drum issues with them. therefore I will assume unless someone can say otherwise, that the shift "preload" wont be harmful to the "wing"

just my 2 cents worth:grinner:
Liquidplumber, (nice handle).. Once a person learns to lightly pre-load the shift lever just as theclutch lever is pulled in there is very little additional wear taking place as the actual pre-load is happening during the de-clutching so the shift forks see little to no actual additional load.

The learning process will probably involve pre-loading the shift lever a little earlier but once proficient at it the pre-load, de-clutch, & shift happen asone fluid movement so the shift is silky smooth with no adverseshift fork wear.

I believe what happens is by using the pre-load process it allows the sliding gear in the trans to move faster (earlier) in the shift process so it slides into engagement without such a difference in shaft speeds.

One benefit of the pre-load method is it allows a very quick shift so cagers don't climb on your tail when leaving a stoplight or merging on the freeway.. At least in my area, if you don't move right along the cagers will crowd you from the rear..

Twisty
 

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I read this thread and started to wonder just how I shifted. The next day I found out this is the way I have shiftet ever since I learned to ride 30 years ago. Every one always said they could tell it was me on the bike just by the way I shifted. I started to shift this way because I always liked to be seen and not heard.
 
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