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Average Goldwing Rider
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure where this started. A week of fantastic riding in eastern Oregon, or some bone head didn't check the electrolyte level in the battery. On Tuesday the diva was making a run up to the nearby Pink n Pull for rare 1999 Mercury Cougar parts. When she started up she didn't display the normal eagerness to run. It turned over a little slowly before starting off. It is about three miles to the freeway and everything was fine till merging onto the freeway. She started cutting out and finally died.
After sitting out in the sun for an hour and a half the wrong tow truck showed up. It was a hook. A few choice words with the driver and he as on his way. While waiting it was determined the battery was boiled off. The battery was pulled and we went out and we went out to the nearby Honda Powersports. They provided a sealed battery, it was installed and the Diva drove home.
Now the fun begins. When the bike got home the new battery charge was low. It was put on the charger overnight at 2 amps in auto mode. After sitting two days it measured fully charged at 12.7 volts. When the bike was started the charging system measured 12.1 to 12.2 volts with the engine running. She went out for a short ride. Voltage never went over 12.2. Back in the garage the battery was down to 12.5. This is not looking good.
Stator checked between 7.8 and 12.4 ohms and no shorts to ground. When the bike was put back on the road in '16 the stator connector was found to be cut out, the wires were twisted together and wrapped with a big tape ball. The tape ball was replaced with 3.9 mm crimp connectors. On inspection one of these was showing heat distress. These were removed and the wires soldered together today.
The next thing to do will be check the grounds and regulator rectifier.
 

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All the resistance readings seem high. I think just an ohm or two is normal. Do the same test but check for AC voltage at 3.000 RPM. Should be over 50 volts AC.

 

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All the resistance readings seem high. I think just an ohm or two is normal.
I agree with the ohm readings being high. The fact that the values are different is highly suspect.
I have tested BAD stators that show 70 volts AC using the test in the video. It is not a valid test, since there is no load on the system? I would also point out that you won't find it in any Honda manual. Windings that are not open and not shorted to ground will produce voltage if the rotor is good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I agree with the ohm readings being high. The fact that the values are different is highly suspect.
I have tested BAD stators that show 70 volts AC using the test in the video. It is not a valid test, since there is no load on the system? I would also point out that you won't find it in any Honda manual. Windings that are not open and not shorted to ground will produce voltage if the rotor is good.
People get confused between measuring resistance and inductance of a circuit. Both are expressed in ohms, but inductance is different than resistance. There is mutal inductance between the magnet and coils in an alternator and the coils in the stator. If you want to make your head hurt just go google how to measure inductance. That is why Honda does not give ohm readings in the FSM.

It is pretty clear the alternator stator is suspect. It seems like heat can cause the insulation in the windings to fail. This can cause a winding to winding short within the coils. I agree, if the coils are not shorted to ground or an open circuit, the alternator can produce voltage (electrical potential) but at a limited amperage (current). Before committing to changing it I want to make sure it the rest of the system is functioning correctly.

So what is the best stator to buy? I see Randakk has one but he is pretty proud of it and doesn't back it up with warranty. There are cheap one on ebay. What about Rick's Motorsports? I less worried about cost, but I don't want to do this again.

I like this one, it appears to be epoxy coated: https://www.electrosport.com/products/esg060-stator-honda-gl1000-1100-1200-goldwing

The regulator rectifier should be updated too. This looks good: https://www.electrosport.com/products/esr290-regulator-rectifier-honda-gl1000-1100-1200
 

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I can only say that I R&Red my 1200's stator in late '90s, used Honda unit, still good.

I cut out a bad connector at same time, replaced with new Honda stator plug kit after taking each wire / connector out of plastic housing and soldering the crimp area. Also took three 12 ga wires from connector bypassing Reg/Rec plug, spliced to three what looked like steel wires from Reg/Rec, crimped with brass tube sections, soldered. I packed new stator plug with dielectric compound, still bright and shiney brass terminals and no sign of heat.
 

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I bought my first stator from Rick's in 1983 for my gl1000. Since then I've installed seven or eight on various bikes, but never twice. I got cheap a few years back and installed an RM stator. DON'T confuse the two. The RM lasted forty seconds, couldn't get my money back, and just a terrible experience all the way around. I did want to try one of the new FET regulators one of these days though.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I bought my first stator from Rick's in 1983 for my gl1000. Since then I've installed seven or eight on various bikes, but never twice. I got cheap a few years back and installed an RM stator. DON'T confuse the two. The RM lasted forty seconds, couldn't get my money back, and just a terrible experience all the way around. I did want to try one of the new FET regulators one of these days though.
glhonda, is the the stator you are describing? https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/New-OEM-Style-Honda-Stator-21_102

Made in USA and a one year warranty, that sounds good. Thinking of the installation, it looks like the engine rear cover and clutch cover gaskets are required. I have read a couple cautions about getting the stator cocked or out of alignment and using a hammer to push the stator into the rear cover. What are these issues about?
 

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How to re-install Stator Safely

glhonda, is the the stator you are describing?
That's the one.


All the rear case covers are different.

Make sure you order the specific year gasket.


The old stator generally just falls out of the cover once the screws are removed.

The new stator is close to a press fit. Don't ask me why.....
Use an impact driver to remove the screws. You'll need to reuse them.

I would be hesitant about smacking the new stator.


I use threaded rod in the case, slip the stator over the top and evenly pull the stator into place with nuts/washers. Make sure of the orientation.


The wires need to exit without pinching.

The clutch cover may or may not need to be removed.
I assume this is on the '85?


BTW. You don't need to break the hydraulics on the clutch. The slave is held by three bolts and can be removed (set aside) without opening the system.



Edited for Readability & Importance by AZgl1800
 

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I use threaded rod in the case, slip the stator over the top and evenly pull the stator into place with nuts/washers. Make sure of the orientation. The wires need to exit without pinching.
That's pretty clever...


...surely you didn't think of it yourself? >:)
 

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Average Goldwing Rider
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Discussion Starter #15
That's the one.


All the rear case covers are different.

Make sure you order the specific year gasket.


The old stator generally just falls out of the cover once the screws are removed.

The new stator is close to a press fit. Don't ask me why.....
Use an impact driver to remove the screws. You'll need to reuse them.

I would be hesitant about smacking the new stator.


I use threaded rod in the case, slip the stator over the top and evenly pull the stator into place with nuts/washers. Make sure of the orientation.


The wires need to exit without pinching.

The clutch cover may or may not need to be removed.
I assume this is on the '85?


BTW. You don't need to break the hydraulics on the clutch. The slave is held by three bolts and can be removed (set aside) without opening the system.



Edited for Readability & Importance by AZgl1800
Yes, the bike is a 1985 GL1200I

So this would be a good shopping list:
Stator: https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/New-OEM-Style-Honda-Stator-21_102
Regulator/ rectifier: https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/Hot-Shot-Style-Honda-Rectifier-Regulator-10_105H
Connector Kit: https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/Wiring-Harness-Connector-Kit-11_104
Rear cover gasket: https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/Honda-Stator-Cover-Gasket-25_103
6mm All thread, three matching nuts and washers
 

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I always forgo installing a connector kit in favor of soldering leads. I use 12 ga wire @ 3 sections @ 36" each. Solder the leads to the stator just prior to installing the engine into the frame. There will be approx. 6 to 8 inches of extra wire per leg by the time it routes to the regulator. I coil the extra in case the engine needs to be removed in the future, leaving enough wire to re-solder. (My wife's idea..) Solder the three leads to the regulator, effectively bypassing the connector plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I always forgo installing a connector kit in favor of soldering leads. I use 12 ga wire @ 3 sections @ 36" each. Solder the leads to the stator just prior to installing the engine into the frame. There will be approx. 6 to 8 inches of extra wire per leg by the time it routes to the regulator. I coil the extra in case the engine needs to be removed in the future, leaving enough wire to re-solder. (My wife's idea..) Solder the three leads to the regulator, effectively bypassing the connector plug.
I agree with soldering the connection at the stator. I think this connector kit is for the regulator/ rectifier end. I would like to re-crimp this connector. This will give a single wire from the stator all the way up to the reg/rec. This reg/rec is the MOSFET. I have one of these on my CB450 and it works great. It is more efficient (less loss) and holds a tighter voltage band. I will use 14 GA wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I spoke to Renee at Rick's The order has been placed. The MOSFET rectifier/ regulator is built to order and should ship on Wednesday. It was $334 total for the stator, rec/ reg, connector kit and gasket. It sounds like these guys are technical and not just a reseller. Now the wait for parts. I will start taking the bike apart.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Saturday Update:
The stator replacement started today. The garage was made ready and the bike was opened up. The side covers, seat, faux tank and fairing lowers were removed. I did some testing of the alternator output. When I started, the battery measured 12.4 volts. Fully charged it should measure 12.7. I discovered the main ground was on a painted surface from the factory. Next will be to drop the exhaust and crash bars, pull the carburetors, drain the fluids and pull the radiator. Here is a short video of today's activities.

 

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Discussion Starter #20
Day Two Update:
I got the exhaust and crashbars off today. No real problems, it is just big and heavy. The replacement stator should be here on Monday. I will post pictures of it. Here is a short video of today's activities:

 
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