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Discussion Starter #1
Noticed the Refrigerator flashing stuff at me, found this on the Internet:

Samsung refrigerator temperature display is blinking. The temperature display on your fridge will blink if the temperature inside the fridge is above 59 degrees Fahrenheit. ... If the lights on this panel are blinking, unplug the refrigerator or turn off power at the circuit breaker for 2 minutes.

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Problem there is, the electrician never labeled a single breaker in this house....
during the time we have been here, when a problem occurs, I plug in a light or watch the device in trouble and flip breakers until someone yells "hey it is off now". Pulling that 5,000 lb fridge :censored: out of the its' space is a B*tch big time, I needed to find the breaker and then make up a label for that circuit. I still have about 15 breakers to go, to where, I do not know :oops:

The major stuff, HVAC, Kitchen Lights, Living room lights, and receptacles are labeled now...
That leaves the bathrooms, bedrooms, my office, etc....
Thank gawd, the guy did not mix ceiling circuits with wall sockets.

. when the breaker was switched back ON, the fridge temp display showed the setting for 3 seconds, and then displayed the actual temp for 10 seconds..... that was 71*F
finally, all of the ice crystals melted out of the milk and OJ (y)

.the temp sensors are bad, I have new ones on order... the Temp is set at 44* but the fridge side is actually at 26*
not good.... need those new sensors, like now.
 

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well at least the compressor did not go out.just saying.hope you get it working like it should. my TV went out when a big thunder sounded this morning but came back on. TV was only thing that went off . all is kinda back to normal.carry on.
 

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Too late now but there is a cheap little tool at the box store that you can hold near the breaker handle and find the dead one, Or it is probably easier to pull the breaker cover and use a voltmeter than to move the fridge.
 

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My breakers were not labeled either, and the wiring is crazy. The guy that built the house was an electrical engineer.
Your fridge is too modern, the older stuff never had those problems.
 

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Remember you probably have to check the top and bottom of the kitchen sockets separately. They are usually one on each phase. (an easy way to get 220 when you only need a little)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Remember you probably have to check the top and bottom of the kitchen sockets separately. They are usually one on each phase. (an easy way to get 220 when you only need a little)
so far, with the receptacles that I have worked with, that is NOT the case, thank gawd.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My breakers were not labeled either, and the wiring is crazy. The guy that built the house was an electrical engineer.
Your fridge is too modern, the older stuff never had those problems.
I wish we had just fixed the Amana that is sitting out in the garage, it developed a water leak internally, and I just didn't feel like tearing into it. Also, the freezer space was very limited, just half of what this Samsung has.

Mardonna had been arguing to replace it for years, she hated the vertical freezer on the side, instead of a drawer down below... understandable as she was in a wheelchair.

the Amana has an old style spring/coil temp stat, it never failed, no electronics in that box.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Too late now but there is a cheap little tool at the box store that you can hold near the breaker handle and find the dead one, Or it is probably easier to pull the breaker cover and use a voltmeter than to move the fridge.
I have had one of those things for decades, you plug the "transmitter" into a wall socket and use the "receiver" at the breaker box....

for some reason, in this house, it did not work at all... several of the breakers showed up as going to that circuit.... I gave up in frustration with it.

I have a telephone wire tracer that works much better, in my industry, we could trace out a single wire pair out of a 200 pair bundles with it.... you had to physically disconnect the wire at one end, connect that to the transmitter... the receiver was so sensitive, that you could isolate the proper wire bundle out of 10-20 wire bundles.... we then split the bundles apart and drilled down to the proper wire pair....

in a home breaker box, that is impracticable, you have to disconnect all of the wires from the breaker switches, a real PITA.

Bottom line, just flip switches until the power goes off to that outlet, 100 times faster than the tricky ways.
 

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I kinda messed up that post. There is a transmitter you plug in the outlet you want to check, then run the receiver over the breakers near the handles and it lights and beeps when it finds the match.
(I'll blame that on getting out of surgery and being in the ICU as I write this)

I guess your electrical code are different. That's the nice thing about standards, there are so many to chose from.
 

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A bit of input here as an electrical contractor.
There are a few kinds of circuits in the house.
1) Appliance circuits=
All the receptacles in Kitchen,dining room, pantry,breakfast rm. These are 20 Amp circuits and can have 15A receptacles.
The appliance branch circuit feeder cannot be combined with lighting circuits or extend behind the rooms mentioned above There must be at least two at the counter space.
Laundry circuit 20A is on own branch and is for laundry receptacles only.
Same goes for 20A bathroom circuit. It can feed all the bathrooms receptacles but nothing else ( this rule is relative new and most old houses have receptacle hooked up to the lighting circuit)

The rest of the house is lighting circuits which includes all the receptacle and lights throughout. all the house.

Back when I started wiring houses there was not a requirement to label the panel.
Then they introduced the labeling as either" Lighting" or " Appliance" circuits.
Later they changed and now it is needed to label a general idea what the circuit feeds.
It is not very easy or accurate as the circuits run in more than one room.
The refrigerator is on the appliance circuit or can have its own 15Amp circuit which is the way I do it.
Having split receptacle( top and bottom) is not at all common .
 

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I wish we had just fixed the Amana that is sitting out in the garage, it developed a water leak internally, and I just didn't feel like tearing into it. Also, the freezer space was very limited, just half of what this Samsung has.

Mardonna had been arguing to replace it for years, she hated the vertical freezer on the side, instead of a drawer down below... understandable as she was in a wheelchair.

the Amana has an old style spring/coil temp stat, it never failed, no electronics in that box.
I have a nephew who is an appliance repairman, he doesn't have much good to say about samsung.
 

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This old house is FAR from code! Originally built in 1918 as a Blacksmith Shop from what I understand. What's now the kitchen and Bathroom were added onto the back of the house probably late 20's or early 30's. Another 6x20 addition tacked on to the rear of that (now Laundry room) with a flat roof, this became the rear of the house with concrete steps into the back yard. I date that addition as 1938 because when I cut a hole in the flat roof to install a swamp cooler I found it insulated with crumpled up April 1938 Denver Post. Had fun reading that :D They poured a 12x20 concrete slab against the rear of the house, this became a nice size outdoor patio. In the 50's or 60's the outdoor patio was enclosed and the flat Laundry roof extended over it. It has its own wall mounted gas fired space heater, not heated by main furnace. This is now my "Den", a bunch of computers, the big screen, nice surround sound system and all my Vinyl LPs live back there. We can guess the date of the addition by the aluminum Romex wire found when replacing the dimmer switch for the ceiling fixtures.

This place was rewired in the 50's/60's, guesstimated by the silver colored "Paper" clad Romex cable (12ga w/16ga ground conductor) found throughout the house (except for the aluminum wire in the Den). I replaced all the two-prong outlets with grounded outlets (got tired of forever looking for adapters), lo and behold the ground conductors are actually ground, even if they are only 16ga.

The breaker panel has a whopping 8 slots, no main disconnect. Main disconnect accomplished by pulling the service meter next to the panel.

Four of the slots used by the 220v gang breakers for the electric range and clothes dryer. That leaves only four 20A circuits for the entire rest of the house. I guess it's adequate, in the entire time I've lived here never have tripped a breaker. I haven't fully mapped them out, but one circuit is the entire livingroom and bedroom, another is the laundry room and makes an appearance in the kitchen, another is kitchen, bathroom and dining room, and the last one is the Den, which also has one kitchen outlet and one livingroom outlet.

I found some Double breakers (two separate 120v breakers in a single housing that fit the same slots as the existing single 120v breakers) for the breaker panel so I can actually get 8 circuits in there. So I added a GFI outdoor outlet at the side patio on its own circuit, and the garage I built 6 yrs ago has its own 20A circuit.

Thinking to check the three outlets in the den (I've never opened them up, already had grounded outlets) to see if they have the Aluminum Romex, if so I think to rewire them with copper and put them on their own separate circuit. Not too concerned about the aluminum wire to the ceiling lights, now all LED and current thru it is nothing!.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here is the breaker panel, the cover has been off for more than a year, as I slowly work my way thru it.
the cover was labeled as said above, "Appliances" sort of, just vague notions that all proved incorrect.


321687


.That labeler donna how to spull :)
the #32 refers to a hand drawn outline of the house, as I walked around the house, I numbered the outlets on the paper drawing for reference later.
Most of the house is still unlabeled, so I just figure it out when something breaks.
 
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