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I have seen on this forum that Michelin made the hi-tour radial tire for the gl1500 back when Dunlop was making the elite II my ? is does any1 know where I can get a set now ?:?
 

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My understanding is that Michelin does not make them any more for the 1500. I couldn't find any mention of it in their current tire lines on their site either. They have a tire specifically made for the 1500, the Pilot GT, but it is bias ply.

There is a company making radials for the GL1500 though. Shinko I have not tried them and I don't know anyone that has, so can't speak to their performance. Care to do a review for us. ;) They are a Japanese company. The info below is from their "About Us" page on their website.

John


"Established in 1946, the Shinko Group began as a manufacturer of bicycle tires and tubes in Osaka, Japan that today has become a burgeoning manufacture of rubber products.

In 1998 the Shinko Group purchased the motorcycle tire technology and molds from Yokohama Rubber Co., and began production of these products under the Shinko Tire brand. With manufacturing based in South Korea and design based in Japan, the company has seamlessly combined Japanese engineering and design principles with South Korean production and quality control standards. Today Shinko Tires produces approximately 200,000 motorcycle tires per month.


In the United States Shinko Tires are imported by Western Power Sports, Inc. (WPS), with corporate headquarters in Boise, Idaho. With a strong foothold on the power sports market, and with warehouses located in Boise, Idaho; Fresno, California; and Memphis, Tennessee, Shinko Tires USA-in conjunction with WPS-is proud to bring you the Shinko line of Sportbike, Cruiser, Scooter, Off road, and Dual sport tires.

On going testing in the USA and R & D at Shinko Tire's factory means a continuous path of exciting tires to meet the need of today's riders. Shinko Tires and WPS are here to serve your needs."
 

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Senior guru thanks for the the info but I really can`t say I know much about them ! I know my 1500 isn`t an 1800 & its not a sport bike but it is mine & I would like to see how many miles /handling the radial has to each his own I guess !
 

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You're welcome. By the way, I wasn't suggesting that you knew about the Shinko's yet. I was just kind of jokingly asking you if you wanted to be the first to run a set on your bike and then review them for us. :) I've been considering it, but I like the Michelin Pilot's so well I'm not sure I want to try something else. :dude: I am a man of meager means myself and am hoping to get many years out of my 1500. :) If it lasts the rest of my days on this planet I'll be thrilled.

John
 

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Honda recommend a Bias ply tyre for the 1500 NOT a radial ... Stay safe ,stick with the manufacturers advice
 

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wexy wrote:
Honda recommend a Bias ply tyre for the 1500 NOT a radial ... Stay safe ,stick with the manufacturers advice
Interesting. I didn't know Honda specifically recommended bias tires for the 1500, but I'm curious. How would a purpose made radial not be as safe as a bias tire on the 1500?

John
 

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A radial tire flexes differently to a bias, in fact very much different because of the different way the cords are laid up etc.

Because of this it will impose different stresses on the structure of the forks and so on. Also it will have different requirements for steering geometry.

One has to assume that in designing a bike this is all taken in to account, and that using the 'wrong' tire will result in less than design performance.

In the end it may be more down to liability than anything else. Honda did their sums one way, they are not going to countenance any deviation.
 

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English Bob wrote:
A radial tire flexes differently to a bias, in fact very much different because of the different way the cords are laid up etc.

Because of this it will impose different stresses on the structure of the forks and so on. Also it will have different requirements for steering geometry.

One has to assume that in designing a bike this is all taken in to account, and that using the 'wrong' tire will result in less than design performance.

In the end it may be more down to liability than anything else. Honda did their sums one way, they are not going to countenance any deviation.
Well said John ;). That's why I like your input on the technical matters - they are always simple and to the point :waving:.

:clapper::clapper::clapper:
 

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Well there is always one in the crowd and here I am. :D I disagree with all of you.

When the 1500 and other earlier bikes were manufactured, there simply were no radial tires, for motorcycles. Several companies did experiment with the manufacture of a radials and ran into some problems so it was discontinued in the United States. However these tires spoken of can still be purchased in other countries.

Then with the manufacture of the 1800, radial tires became a reality. Not so much because of the bike, but because of better design and engineering of tires. Gradually improvements are still taking place with these, for example the Avon Cobra, a very high priced and highly engineered tire that almost got the axe from liability issues of folks using a 70 series tire that started coming apart . All these things help the evolution of tires. Maybe one day we will have a Run Flat for bikes.


Put a 1800 and 1500 side by side, what is the real difference? The forks are basically the same, the bushings are the same, the principle is the same, the rear suspension is basically the same, has the one single shock.

So what is the difference that would require the use of radial tires or not the use of them, can anyone explain the exact difference and reason? The radial tires worked well on the 1500 it is just that that particular Michelin tire had some problems with the tire, not the bike, so it was dropped in this country. But is still alive and well in other countries.

So can anyone tell me exactly why a radial will not work, or why it is not safe. What is the difference between the 1500 and 1800.

Kit
 

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I have put Avon Azzaro radial tires on both my 83 Magna & 84 Sabre and they work very very well, and have had zero problems with them, these bike were built before radial tires were available for motorcycles.

I think the issue with radial tires on touring cycles is the load ratings for the sidewall, as radials sidewalls flex more.

Others on this list say the rims on the 1500 aint made for radials. I was in the auto biz for way too long, and there was no problem putting radials on rims that originally had bias or belted tires

On car rims I never saw any difference in rims that came with bias or radials, the only exception was the TRX option that was availabel on some 80's Mustangs, that rim was sized for a certain Michelin tire, and Michelen was the only tire maker to make a tire that fit that rim- the Michelin TRX.

Even on the Big Trucks=Kenworth- freightliner etc, when we switched from bias to radial we used the same rims.

I think the 1500 rim would work just fine with radials, as long as the radial tire was properly inflated. I run 41 psi-front, 43 rear on my v4s, and that is about 6 or 7 psi higher than what Mom Honda recommended for the original tires

I think a radial with the right load rating would work great on a Wing, But the gains would be fairly small.
Even on a bias tyre the Wing will lean far enough over to drag lots of itself on the pavement before the tire lets loses traction.

The wear factor may or may not be an issue between radial & bias. :baffled:
 

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What would be the advantage of going to a bias tire as oppose to the radial that came on the bike????????
 

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Ah, Foodman, the gl 1500 came with bias ply tires.
 

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The Hi Tours had some type of problem and after a class action suit against Michelin they quit making them.

As for radials on a 1500 I think the main obstacle will be getting a tire with a reasonable overall diameter that will fit within the swing arm. Radials are wider for the same heightthan bias ply tires. It's just because the sidewalls of radials bow out more than the stiffer bias ply tire. Since there's precious little clearance between the tire and swing arm on the 1500 to start with any width increase of the tire is going to cause problems. The single sided arm on the 1800 doesn't have this problem.
 

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Radials will never catch on...they'll instantly catch fire and throw their tread!...it's all about sidewall strength and flex....properly designed, a radial is perfectly suitable for bikes....it's the direction that the cords are wrapped....a bias ply typically has strong sidewalls but lousy grip/handling...most made today are on trailers...they do make radial trailer tires now...100% of car tires are radials...soon that way for bikes?...I don't know...****
 

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Well I was wondering about the "Honda recommended bias tires for the 1500" statement because I hadn't seen that, so I checked what my owners manual for my 2000SE had to say. It does not specify bias ply tires anywhere. It simply says to replace the tires with the same size, load range and speed rating as the originals and it does specifically say to not use a car tire. Sooo, am I missing something somewhere? I understand that they have different characteristics than bias ply tires, that's part of their advantage. So far I'm not buying the argument that because they'redifferent that they are unsafe. If the tire is designed for the 1500 as the Shinko's mentioned above are, what makes them unsafe for the 1500, specifically?

John
 

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The reason the 1500 manual says specifically not to use a CT is because the MC wheel and auto rim are different sizes. Trying to force a CT unto the larger 1500 rim as has been tried in the past tends to tear the tire bead, and it does not like to seat even with over 100 pounds of pressure in it. A CT is designed to fit various automobile rims, and does have a tolerance in it, but the rim of the 1500 is just too big. Hence the warning.


As far as using radials designed for the specific use for a Bike, I can find no reason if available not to. Bikes are not designed to fit the tire, the tire is designed for the bikes. The 1800 is furnished from the factory with radials, as it was about that time that the development of radial tires for bikes was more developed and more models were being manufactured in the sizes that would cross Brand lines and the development of radial tires became a profitable venture for manufactures.

I would think that due to the odd size of the 1500 rim is why most manufactures have not pursued this avenue. They already had the design and process in place for the normal tires, michelin did experiment with it a bit, ran into problems with the sidewall construction, and even now some of the modern radial tires tend to delaminate at times.

The only thing that causes me question , with the Shinko, is will it actually work on the 1500? I really do not know as I have never seen one installed on the 1500. I do know a radial tire is wider, and flexes more like a pancake under stress, so will it rub on the frame of the 1500? That would be my main question about them.

Kit

Kit
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
The reason the 1500 manual says specifically not to use a CT is because the MC wheel and auto rim are different sizes. Trying to force a CT unto the larger 1500 rim as has been tried in the past tends to tear the tire bead, and it does not like to seat even with over 100 pounds of pressure in it. A CT is designed to fit various automobile rims, and does have a tolerance in it, but the rim of the 1500 is just too big. Hence the warning.
Just to be clear, the only reason I mentioned the car tire was to illistrate what the owners manual said and what it didn't say. I didn't want to get another car tire debate going, and I'm not suggesting you do either Kit. :)

John
 

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Kit Carson wrote:
The only thing that causes me question , with the Shinko, is will it actually work on the 1500? I really do not know as I have never seen one installed on the 1500. I do know a radial tire is wider, and flexes more like a pancake under stress, so will it rub on the frame of the 1500? That would be my main question about them.

The extra flexing would only be at the ground at the footprint. The weight would cause the tire to spread, and as the tire rolled past the flex would go away and the tire would be narrow for the other 345 degrees around so it would pass through the frame no problem. Go out an look at your car tires, and see right were they sit at the ground they spread out a little bit, but the rest of the way around the tire, they look normal.

I have a friend that has a set of Michelin radials on his 1500 and he loves them.

I have lots of tread on my current tires, but when I wear them out, I just may try a set of the Shinko's.

Oh, and I believe that the wheel that is odd ball in size is on the 1200. The 1500 is a true 16 inch. But the 1500motorcycle tire is narrower than any car tire available so a car tire wouldn't fit between the frame legs.
 
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