Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
360 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
imported post

I was riding my Wing yesterday and the wind was very strong. It was coming from my right and a big gust comes up and the Wing leans into the wind. Generally, if you have wind blowing on an object it will push that object in the direction the wind is blowing, not into the wind. Why does the bike lean toward the wind? I'm not knowingly compensating for the wind by leaning the bike toward the wind, but maybe that's just the natural reaction. Is that it or is something else involved here? I figure it must be the natural reaction to lean the bike without thinking about it. How strong does a wind have to be to be dangerous?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

When riding your bike at high speeds, to turn right, you do what? Turn the handlebar to the left, which leans the bike over to the right, and you veer to the right. It's because of the centrifugal forces in the wheels.

The wind either is causing you to compensate by leaning into the gust, and when the gust subsides, you are no longer fighting the wind from the right, but now you turn right since you are no longer having to compensate as much from the forces to your right. Just a natural reaction, like you said.

Also, if the wind catches your bike down low enough, it causes your bike to lean right, therefore start turning right.

I've had 60-70 mph wind gusts from the side a few times, don't like it at all. A close second to riding in the rain for me...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
360 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
imported post

As I thought. Years ago I was going to a conference and someone else going to same conference (about five hours from where I live) died crashing his bike on an open highway. They found him and the bike in the ditch, with no indication of the cause. I thought at the time that maybe he was hit by a big gust of wind that took him over. I don't think it was every proven, one way or another. I asometimes bend down low when it's windy, figuring it would reduce my surface area for the wind to hit. I don't know if it works.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,212 Posts
imported post

Just yesterday herewe had a few gusts.

Something I found out about my GL1500 is it will automatically lean into the wind. ALL my other bikes did the opposite but they were NOT full fairings. I've always fought the windto keep control.

So,... experiment I did. I ever so lightly gripped the throttle just for speed & didn't input any for steering, I used my body to keep the bike running straight. Low-and-behold the bike tilted into the wind & road straight as an arrow. I've done this before in concrete grooves but never thought about doing it for side winds.

I can't believe this was an intentional MFG design but I like it! Takes a lot of worry off my mind in low & moderate winds.

 

·
Administrator
Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
Joined
·
61,628 Posts
imported post

I have also noted that at speed on the slabs, that the 1500 will keep a straight track, just the wheels will move over to help keep your body in the same place it was.

Providing you don't stiffen up on the handlebars. Just a light touch, and it will take care of itself.

Great bike for touring, I loved mine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
imported post

I spent a very scarey two hours on my 1100 a few years back in high gusty winds. You really had to lean into the wind and then suddenly the wind would stop. You had to recover quickly. It was real white knuckle time. I have ridden my 1800 in the same kind of winds and was surprised at how little effect the wind had , I felt much safer.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

The bike leans into the wind because of tire slip. Not actual skidding but there's some slip down wind due to the wind pressure, you unconsciously correct with a bit of counter steering to maintain a straight path which causes the bike to lean because you're actually turning into the wind while the tire slip is pushing the bike downwind the same amount.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
210 Posts
imported post

Last year heading South from Scotland back into good old England on the motorway, the wind was very strong and severe gusts hitting the Wing from different sides. I just held on and my 1500 kept a reasonably good straight line when travelling around 65 MPH. The other two Wings behind me (both 1800s) were having a terrible time and the wind kept blowing them into the next lane. So much so, that they gave up, left the motorway and found a hotel to stop in for the night. I just kept going until I reached home. All three of us had heavily laden bikes and pillion riders.

So, does the 1500 handle/keep a straight line far better than 1800s in strong winds, or was it just down to rider skills?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
imported post

I rode across Nebraska at one time on my 1200 along with a couple of harley deckers so it must be luck rather than skill :) :) :) we all manged to stay upright.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
672 Posts
imported post

Slaphead Scouser wrote:
Last year heading South from Scotland back into good old England on the motorway, the wind was very strong and severe gusts hitting the Wing from different sides. I just held on and my 1500 kept a reasonably good straight line when travelling around 65 MPH. The other two Wings behind me (both 1800s) were having a terrible time and the wind kept blowing them into the next lane. So much so, that they gave up, left the motorway and found a hotel to stop in for the night. I just kept going until I reached home. All three of us had heavily laden bikes and pillion riders.

So, does the 1500 handle/keep a straight line far better than 1800s in strong winds, or was it just down to rider skills?
I have owned a 1200 and 1500. In believe the wind has less effect on my 1800 than the other two. The first time I rode it in windy conditions I was really surprised at the difference. I figured it had to do rounder lines of the 1800. ??

Leaning way into a corner the other day when the wind suddenly gusted, found me backing off the throttle and putting the bike back to the upright position. I felt like the wind could have pushed me down if I remained at the peg scraping angle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
imported post

This is just my guess after thinking about it a bit, I could be wrong, but this is my theory.

A gust of wind from the side pushes against the bike equally along the entire bike. The back wheel is planted firmly, and cannot move. However, the front wheel is set up with a bit of a caster, so it has some "give" to the wind.

Let's assume we get a gust of wind from the right. The front of the bike can get pushed over to the left, because the caster of the front wheel allows it to turn slightly to the left and "give" to the wind. Think about this - pushing a shopping cart, with the two castering wheels in front: if the wheels are facing straight ahead, and you push the front of the cart to the left, what happens to the wheels? They turn left in response, because of how the caster is set up.

Now what happens when you turn the front wheel (i.e. handlebars) of a motorcycle to the left while at speed? The bike leans into a turn to the right.

So that gust of wind from the right, actually ends up making your bike lean to the right, into the wind.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
488 Posts
imported post

It's because of the centrifugal forces in the wheels.

That is very close to the right answer. Wind on the wheel turning at high speed is just the same as the force used to change direction on a rotating chopper blade. When you push on an object spinning it reacts at 90 degrees after the input. Do you remember playing with old wooden tops? That is also just like a gyro. Any force input will react at 90 degrees after the imput so when the wind strikes the tire at aprox the same level as ground it reacts at the bottom of the wheel and that is where the spinning mass reacts. So as the wind blows left to right it causes the tires to move left to right, only at the road surfas it feels like it is reacting just the oppeset to the wind but it is acting as it should.So as the wind hits the wheel it reacts 90 degrees after the wind strikes the tire, at the road surfas.

I hope I said that so you get the jest of this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
imported post

I was blown away the first time I flew a helicopter, when I learned that the cyclic control actually operates the blades to maneuver the rotor disc 90 degrees from what is desired. If you move the cyclic forward, the rotor blades increase in pitch as they move from the front until they are directly out the side, and then decrease in pitch as they retreat towards the rear of the aircraft. This applies upward pressure on the rotor disc on the side, which, due to gyroscopic procession, causes the rotor disc in actuality to tip forwards, causing the helicopter to move forwards.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top