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Although I have a degree in it, I am a weak historian. Nevertheless, weak historian or not, I believe that in general, down through the ages, nomadic peoplehave been more satisfied andhappy than thosefenced up in cities.

The Bedouin on his camel, the Comanche on his war pony, the Mongo with his composite bow, the Eskimo with his dogsled... none of them had any psychiatrists on retainer! They had few possessions, but those they had were cherished and repaired and appreciated daily. The onlything they had in abundance was freedom --the unlimited skies above and the ever-changing horizons before them-- and in this freedom was their very self-fulfillment, their very happiness. The fact that they were happy cannot be disputed. Many early Indian white captives, once rescued, would often run off to rejoin the nomadic tribes that had taken them. This was a very common issue on the American frontier.

I think the attraction of motorcycle touring to me is rooted in this phenomenon. We own too much. I am most happy when I can see everything I"own," when I can cherish and repair andappreciate what I have, and then store it securely away in the bags on my bike, just as did a Bedouin caravanner or a Comanchewarriorso long ago....with every item having a place and purpose.Most of the unhappiness in my life has been causedby things I "own" but don't really need. To have little andto not know in the morning where I will sleep that night is pure joy to me.... to know that whether I get there or not depends mostlyupon me and the stuff in my bags... joy. Joy,pure and simple.

The simplicity of nomadic life is the issue. Our lives are shot through with soul-killing complexity: somebody in India sneezes and we lose our job; some corporate idiot runs off and makes an offshore deposit and our life savings curl away and disappear like smoke in the wind. Our houses, our cars, our very means of lifearethreatened daily bypeople we don't know and can't see, by events beyond our knowledge, understanding,or control.....

The hell with it all.... changing horizons and open skies. That's all I need. I just need to figure out how to find them, how to get back to them!

:cheeky1:
 

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I think you my have hit on something there. I have seen so many people whose major concern is keeping all their "things" just so. They want more "things" and bigger "things". Perhaps using the old addage of KISS is the way to go. However I may need a trailer for my bike to keep my "things" in it.
 

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Mel,

You're a hopeless romantic for simpler times!

I like your way of thinking. I have been trying to downsize on my plethra of toys and electronics and trying to get Debbie (Mrs Big Kahuna) to do the same. We're not having much luck at it.

BTW, does anybody know how to install a home theater room with a 150" screen on a Goldwing? I need real help!!

:cool:
 

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Sorry, that's plethora not plethra!
 

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All through my teenage years I couldn't wait to get out on the road. I had it all planned out, an old shovelhead, my carpenters tools, and a bedroll.

I was going to just follow the good weather and go where ever that took me . I figured that when I needed money I would just stop and pick up work for a few days.

Life hasn't worked out totally that way for me but I have never lost the wander lust. I am fortunate that I usually get to scratch that itch when it arises.

They could put something like:
"Let's go see what's over there!" on my tombstone. It would be fitting, I like to explore.
 

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I agree CJ, If it were not for the wife and daughter I would likely be living in the wind. Me and a friend talked about it many times, Just as Norton said "Follow the good weather".

I was reading over on the ADV board once and the subject of patchholders and 1%ers came up. Many could not understand why someone would chose that lifestyle But I understand the lure of it extreemly well. A brotherhood when you need it a place to crash and a shop when required, Otherwise living on the road.
 

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Big Kahuna,

That's all right. I read it as plethora because I knew what you meant. :D

I used to have a 27' Yellowstone travel trailer. Mardonna and I started out life together in that little abode. We joke about going through all the jeans pockets, looking under the car seats to find enough pennies to buy a block of butter so supper would taste good :)

There was something about that trailer that gave us comfort, security, the knowledge that we always had what we needed.

10 years later, I had a midlife crisis of sorts and decided to change jobs. We left what we had and went to Denver City, Texas to start a new life working for Shell Pipeline. That trailer once again was our home, only this time it comforted two children that were 3 and 4 years old.

Our current home is a perfect example of the "Gotta have more syndrome."

I am now saddled with an albatross of a house, 2 floors we don't want. Stairs Mardonna can't climb. Mortgage payments I can't meet unless I continue working past retirement age and add the social security check to the mix.

We look out our kitchen window longingly at the 34' 1978 Avion travel trailer we have now. Paid for decades ago. In like new condition as only the Avions and Air Streams seem to be able to do. Something to be said for all Aluminum construction. Interior is solid Mahogany and well preserved by loving hands.

We want to dump the Albatross and go back to our simpler lifestyle. I have in the last year since my accident discovered that the newer laptops provide me with more computer power than I need. The monster desktop I always had with 4 hard drives, monster plugin cards and other geewhiz accessories I always used for "this and that". I don't use anymore, nor do I feel the need for them anymore.

So, going back to a smaller abode is very doable for us. When the settlement comes in, it hopefully will be large enough to pay off Albatross. Then I will either just sell it at market to unload it, or lease it out. Either way, the Avion stays, but we have our eyes on a larger 5th wheel that would provide all the comforts of home that we will need. The Avion will become a summer retreat in cooler places then.

We want to be able to follow our interests for a while before travel is not an option in our lives. I think that we have 10-15 years left of a "good life", if oil don't go to $500/barrel :( We want to get another Goldwing and be able to tour with it again.

A smaller home base is all we need. Something on one level without any stairs up or down. No sunken living rooms like Albatross has. No bedrooms upstairs that aren't being used. No front entrance that has 4 steps to a landing, and then 4 steps down to the sidewalk. What idiot dreamed that up? And why did I ever think of buying it?

A simpler life. Yes, CJ, I can hear your yearning.
 

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:D I wanted to go to Alaska when I graduated from high school in 1960. Got married that year in June,still married to same Lady. Now I want to ride the continual divide fromNew Mexico toMontana then to Washington down to California back to Texas. If I don't do it this yearIprobably want make it on a motorcycle. :(
 

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I was in the Merchant Marine for 20 years. This, in itself, is nomadic in nature. You only take what you can carry. Never needed a house. It was just me and my scooter (shovel head). I lived out of my saddle bags. Drifted here and there. I could get a job, anywhere there was a port.

I was, what was once called, a saddle tramp. Hence the term scooter tramp. The sea and the road was my home. No room for a wife and kids. From time to time, I did try to ‘settle down’. Never worked out though. Once you experienced that kind of freedom – come and go as you please, when you what – settling down to the every day ‘dramas’, of settled life, just bores the hell out of a man.

Of course, life has a way of ‘catching up’ to you now and then. Having the ability to hop on a ship and get out of Dodge (disappear, if you will), is a big plus.

This worked well. When I was young. Which, unfortunately, is the point. As I got older, sleeping in a bed, with a roof over my head became more appealing, as time went on. Specially during the winter months. Even so, I didn’t ‘settle down’ until I was in my 40’s, at that I did it on my own terms. Fortunately, I could take what I did, on board ship and use it on the beach. So I got a shore side job.

As you can imagine, this kind of lifestyle is not conducive to most women. The concept of living with one woman took some getting used to. Rebuilding my shovel head is easier. Adjusting to settled life, has been an adventure in itself. Still, I do miss the road. So ‘touring’ will just have to do.
 

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I've always said that if I ever won the lottery, I'd invest in a new bike, put everything that didn't fit in the bags and trunk in storage, and head out for wherever the front tire lands.

Stop occasionally to have the bike serviced, if it needs repair, trade it off on something new and different for the next leg.

Can you see the look at the stealership now?

"Sir, your new back tire will cost $375 plus installation"
"Okay, how much will you give me on trade in? I want that bike right over there"
"But sir, it's only a tire"
"Yep, and I'm "tired" of that bike...I want that one over there right now"

:D
 

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Damn, you seem to hit it on the head every time.

I dream at night of hitting the lotto. Helping my family, giving the property to my daughters and telling Nancy, we're leaving in the morning.

I really believe, if I just gave it all away tomorrow, I'ld be happier and live alot longer.

But tomorrows obligations are waiting.

I'll dream on it tonight and hope for tonights lotto. 30+ million. :cool:
 

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Amen!

When I was in college, my two loves were hanging at Myrtle Beach, SCin the summer and skiingat Beech Mt., NC in the winter. I had it all worked out to spend summers lifeguarding for Lack's Beach Service and workingfor the Beech Mt. Ski Patrol all winter. I figured I could turn wrenches to make ends meet in the off seasons. I never cared to own a place of my own. Happy to live out of my old K-5 Blazer, bumming from place to place. I was famous for packing up and being gone for days on end. Coming back with a story or two, and not much else.

Silly me, I interviewed for a job in my last year of college. They offered it to me and it turned into a great career. Met a girl there that wouldn't get out of my heart, so we got married and started a horse farm.

Its been a great ride. That job actually worked out pretty well. They paid off that farm for me and my wife and we now enjoy semi-retirement living. We travel when we want, but she still refuses to get on the bike. Maybe one day...



I wouldn't trade it for nothing, but I do think nomads are happier in general.:)
 

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Big Kahuna wrote:
Mel,

You're a hopeless romantic for simpler times!

I like your way of thinking. I have been trying to downsize on my plethra of toys and electronics and trying to get Debbie (Mrs Big Kahuna) to do the same. We're not having much luck at it.

BTW, does anybody know how to install a home theater room with a 150" screen on a Goldwing? I need real help!!

:cool:
the big screen will really effect your gas mileage.:cheeky1:
 

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SB in SC wrote:
Amen!

When I was in college, my two loves were hanging at Myrtle Beach, SCin the summer and skiingat Beech Mt., NC in the winter. I had it all worked out to spend summers lifeguarding for Lack's Beach Service and workingfor the Beech Mt. Ski Patrol all winter. I figured I could turn wrenches to make ends meet in
Its been a great ride. That job actually worked out pretty well. They paid off that farm for me and my wife and we now enjoy semi-retirement living. We travel when we want, but she still refuses to get on the bike. Maybe one day...



I wouldn't trade it for nothing, but I do think nomads are happier in general.:)
SB in SC!

Hey, bud! Can't do anything about the Beach services, but we have plenty of need for ski patrollers! I could refresh ya in a New York minute, get you all current, and you could patrol with the Snoqualmie Pass Volunteer Ski Patrol! We need people, bad..... for some reason, people don't seem as willing to help people much anymore....:(

Heck, you could even ride one of your horses up to the Patroller Lodge! My wife's brother keeps horses...sort of..... he sometimes pastures them out but they usually run away and beat him home! (I said he kept them, I didn't say he trained them....) You could keep one there......:cheeky1:

We have a good place to patrol.... got up all the way to five degrees above today!
 

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SB in SC wrote:
Amen!

Met a girl there that wouldn't get out of my heart, so we got married
I wouldn't trade it for nothing, but I do think nomads are happier in general.:)
Isn't it amazing how many of us would be nomads, have a woman in our lives. :baffled:

I don't think Nancy would be satisfied sitting in the camp, scrapeing a buffallo or deer hide to make our clothes.

Oh well. I don't think I would change a thing either.
 

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I've always had a mental image of a bike being the present day equivalent of a horse, definitely faster on the straightaway, but not as good in poor conditions. Either way you can put your bedroll on the back and go.

Oh I wish!!!
 

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Cousin Jack, instead of a historian, you should have been a carpenter because I think that you've hit the nail on the head...There is just something about being out there, right hand on the thottle, and "who know's what" over the horizon....I can honestly say that being on my bike only adds fuel to the fire...I just want to ride, and ride..and ride... I've not done any touring like most of you experienced riders, but I'm hoping to take my first overnight trip during the holidays...and I could only imagine what it would be like heading out west...As a teenager, I lived in the Black Hills of South Dakota, and I can only imagine what it would be like to ride up there..On a basketball road trip to Sheridan, Wyoming we went 100 miles without seeing a house..and I'm sure that it's different now, but what a great place it must be to ride..and camp..and ride...and camp...I agree with you whole-heartedly about the "nomad" thing...Some of us just have it in our blood..
 

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chesterwgunn wrote:
As a teenager, I lived in the Black Hills of South Dakota, and I can only imagine what it would be like to ride up there....

The Black Hills! It's better than you can imagine, Chester, much, much better! The Needles Highway, Iron Mountain Road, Spearfish Canyon, Custer State Park, Wind Cave National Monument, The Crazy Horse Monument, and Mt. Rushmore....... Red and I visit the Hills just about every year, and every year it is as rich as the year before! I never tire of it, and we always manage to camp in the Badlands National Park on our way there, and at Devil's Tower on our way home. I love the place. If you lived there once, you were blessed....... and your soul has never really left it.

Better get on that thing and put that right hand on the throttle! Get out to the Black Hills again, with all the ghosts of the West whispering on the ever-rushing wind.....
 

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You did it again CJ. I might be sitting inside while the snow is piling up outside with fridged temps, but you just put me back out on the High Plains of Wyoming where I felt so free and so glad to be alive. It was truely the part of my trip when nothing mattered. Time never occurred to me,,,,,,, I would end up where ever at the end of my day. I had whatever I would need and I was very pleased with myself. To dare and go to the unknown solo andrelying only on myself. (Yeah right,,,,,,, I still have the phone #s of forum members just incase);)

Thanks for the mid-winter ride CJ,,,,,,,,, sure feels good.
 
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