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Hi all,

Well, I was changing the belts on my 1100. I had the timing mark where it was supposed to be, and the cam pulleys were in the correct locations. I had the bike in 5th gear and was using the back wheel to move the engine. I did not mark the crankshaft pulley like I should have. Anyway, with the belts off somehow I got the timing mark to T2. All I was trying to do was fine tune the belts. Could moving the engine with the wheel cause valve damage? I stopped when I felt any resistance, but being at T2 doesnt bode well.

Dave:X
 

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you want to set the mark in the inspection hole at t1 not t2.turn the crankshaft back wards just a tad at thenut at the crankshaftwith a 17mm socket or wrench and get T1 in the inspection holeif possible and then take a break and study the procedure from octane again or start by reading again might be the best thing to do. moving the rear wheel can damage the valvesit if not set correctly. jb
 

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You might be lucky on that for now. As long as you didn't try to force it you may have no damage. First thing I'd do is pop off the valve covers and see which valves are under pressure and back the adjusters all the way out to relief the tension on them. Slowly work the crank around to the correct markings while relieving the adjusters as you go.

Heck, just back off all the adjusters before doing anything else. Once you get the belts and timing right then just adjust the valves. They may need it anyways.

Pop out the plugs too to make turning the engine easier.
 

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turning with the wheel should not cause damage.... but now you got to go back and get it all set right
 

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I agree with Rodger. If you had the plugs out you would feel any obstruction before you did any damage. When you go to straighten this out do not force anything. If it does not move freely then you need to regroup. Backing off the adjusters (as mentioned) might be the best way to go.
 

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so speaking of screwing the pooch.... my son is driving a dawoe.... belt broke.... valves are toast

so I looked up our toyota sienna.... recommended timing belt change 80K.... we have 120K
 

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Whiskerfish wrote:
..... Backing off the adjusters (as mentioned) might be the best way to go.
Emphasis here!!!..... while there are other ways to get there, backing off completely on the valve adjusters will make the situation safe to proceed..
 

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The reason I prefer to turn the engine with a wrench on the crankshaft bolt, instead of the rear wheel or even the bolt on the back of the stator shaft is because you can feel interference a lot more sensitively than any other way. I do it with the spark plugs out and the transmission in neutral. It is possible to damage valves turning the engine fron the rear wheel, not too likely though.

You could check the valves by removing the rocker covers and seeing if you had any unusually large clearance gaps in the rockers as you turned the engine but I wouldn't do that. Just get the belts on correctly and hand turn the engine to make sure you don't have any interference, remember it takes TWO full turns to take all four cylinders through their paces. If all feels well fire the bike up and see if it runs okay. If a valve is slightly bent you'll hear it through the exhaust either as a miss or slight backfiring. If you have that happen then it will be time to pull the offending head and take a look. Most likely you haven't damaged anything.
 

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buford56,

Make sure you rotate the centre crank 15% in either direction BEFORE turning any pullys, or you will do some damge. after the T1 markd is set, and the pullys on the correct marks, move the center crank back to its original position, put your belts on after the center crank is back iin the orig position, then slowly turn the pulley with a boxed in wrench,. If no resistance is felt, you should be ready to fire it up. If no start, but backfires, etc, 1/2 round off.

Nightrider1

buford56 wrote:
Hi all,

Well, I was changing the belts on my 1100. I had the timing mark where it was supposed to be, and the cam pulleys were in the correct locations. I had the bike in 5th gear and was using the back wheel to move the engine. I did not mark the crankshaft pulley like I should have. Anyway, with the belts off somehow I got the timing mark to T2. All I was trying to do was fine tune the belts. Could moving the engine with the wheel cause valve damage? I stopped when I felt any resistance, but being at T2 doesnt bode well.

Dave:X
 

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When putting on new timing belts, I had accidentally got the timing mark to T2 using the back wheel with thebelts not installed. I was afraid that I had possibly bent a valve or two. Anyway, I backed off on the tappets and spun it back to T1. Installed the new timing belts and adjusted the valves. She runs great, I think possibly better then before. No more whine from the belts either, and the tension is correct. Now new brake pads and an oil change.

Man was I relievedafter I started her up. Feels good! Thanks for the advice!

:cool::jumper:
 

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I merged your last post with the previous post, showing everything you have been through. This way we can all see what has been done, and the final results.

Glad it's all coming together for you!
 
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