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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After fighting with my 88 Goldwing I have made a command decision....time for a new bike. I have fought with this bike for over a month now changing the throttle cables. My #1 rule has always been "When you get frustrated back off and start up later". Well it has now been a month and I am putting the last piece of plastic back on. I fought the bike and the bike won. So I will be packing it up and taking it back to my father in law and he can do whatever he wants with the bike. The Goldwings are, IMHO, the best highway bikes going but when it comes to maintenance they are a bear. I can honestly say that this is my last GW.
 

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It's hard to believe that you are having issues with a 25 year old bike. Have your father in law post it for sale here. I am sure it will sell quickly.
 

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Perhaps someone who gets along a little better with a wrench and is close to you could lend a hand. I would if you were in Virginia but it's a pretty long stretch to San Antonio
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I consider myself above average in the mechanic department. Timing belts no problem, air filter no problem, brakes no problem, forks seals no problem. It took me 4 hours to get to the cables. 1 hour to change them and 29 days to get everything back on. I called a "Starving Mechanic" and asked him what he would charge to change the cables, before I started, and he said "I'm not hungrey enough to work on Goldwings." I called my local Honda dealership and they said "We only work on new bikes."
 

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I share you frustrations.. I think that's way you can't buy Dynamite at the hardware store.................
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I could not have done 1/10th of the stuff I have done on this bike without this forum. All of the videos walked me through each task. Some sent me a video example of their cable change and it helped a lot. His bike was a newer bike so some stuff was different. It just should not be this hard to work on a bike. I understand that all of the plastic has to come off but man.
 

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Man ...we ride MOTORCYCLES!
YOU ride motorcycles.
Stick with it.
If this **** was easy, ...well then, ...the V-twin crowd would be riding 'Wings.
WE ...ride the unconventional, ...the horizontally opposed, ...the liquid boxer that can take the mileage other bikes can only dream about.

Don't do it for yourself - do it for the bike. In 20 years it'll thank you.

So there! That's my best effort towards encouragement. Work with it Man! ....work with it.
 

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True, Goldwings are more difficult to work on. No argument there. True, Honda doesn't support them worth a hoot either. The saving grace is that Goldwings don't often need a lot of maintenance. My '93 never required much more than routine maintenance in the 100k miles I rode it. I changed timing belts, changed the alternator and tires and brakes and that's about it. A friend near here has nearly 400k miles on his 1500 and hasn't done any major maintenance either. Throttle cables should last at least 20 years if the bike isn't kept out in the rain so even though it's a pain it isn't necessary very often. That goes for a lot of parts on the bike. Once you have it in good condition it will stay that way with little further effort. Yeah I've cussed them but usually once you settle down and do the job it isn't all that bad and once it's done it won't need to be done again for a long time. It's also true there isn't a more reliable road bike anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Exavid I agree 100% with everything you said. My problem right now is my time is worth more than money so should I want to get someone else to work on my bike there are no takers. The rightful owner of this bike is my father in law. He is a Goldwing guy, still has his original 1975 1000. So the bike will go back to Amarillo and he will trike it or sell it.
 

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1993 gl1500, 1976 gl1000
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What's the point of getting rid of it now that all the hard work is done. :? All the rest is easy. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
All very good points. My 82 GL1100 was a great bike. Made the mistake of selling it to make room for the 1500. I have been doing my home work visiting a lot of forums checking out bikes so I will take the next few months find what is right for me and that will be that.
 

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I have an 82 1100 running great, needs painted and a little work, and lots of extra parts I'd trade you for that 88 even up LOL

88 is a great bike! I have one and loved it! Sure hard work at times to fix little things, but that makes it fun to, at least for me.
I only stopped riding mine because it was hit by a deer last year, in the side, and just got insurance settled recently on it.
Couple weeks or so I plan to be riding it again!

88, it came with all extra's, first year of 1500, and can run antique tags now!
Great bike, well worth the effort to learn to work on it.

Mine only had 180K miles on it when the deer hit it and ran like new still.
I just hope it still runs as well after sitting a year!
 

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It just should not be this hard to work on a bike. I understand that all of the plastic has to come off but man.
I agree...and sympathize! I'll keep the Blackbird, but I do not enjoy working on her :lash: First bike after all these years I've been amazed at the effort required to do even some of the simplest (on other bikes) upkeep and service items.

But...It is what it is. I won't pay the Honda dealer $90 per hour to do what I can do for myself (within reason).
 

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A friend of mine used to ride Harleys and even owned a dealership. He talks about sitting at a KOA with the engine dissasembled. Many times he said it was just part of owning a Harley and doing a lot of long distance riding. But he says now he rides his yellow GL1800 and he has put over a Hundred & Twenty thousand miles on it and other than regular maintenance and a can of SeaFoam every year he hasn't had to do anything else to it. My 1993 had right at 100,000 miles with no major maintenance done to it at all. The new 1996SE I have only owned a year and have already put 10,000 miles on it most of that time was winter. Yes these bikes can be a pain in the butt to work on because of the plastic. But you really just have to take it slow to put it back together. Of course knowing multiple swear words in several languages helps also.
 

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What gets me are these dealerships that don't work on older bikes. You're not the first person to have this issue and to be honest, ot would burn me as a customer too. Sadly for everyone else in your boat, the local Honda dealer works on all bikes, age doesn't matter, no wonder he's so respected.
 

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Cromagjeff, I can sympathize with your situation. I, like yourself, try to work on every one of my bikes, however, being a mediocre mechanic, I sometimes have to farm out some of the tougher things. I won't even attempt to change the back tire on my Valkyrie. At least for me, I am lucky enough to have a great, older mechanic in my area who is there when I need him. Perhaps you can try to look beyond your area and find a mechanic willing to help with the cable. With the amount of members on this forum, someone may be able to turn you on to a mechanic willing to help! In the end, the bike would be worth keeping if not for the cable problems. So maybe spend a little more time trying to locate some help.
 

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I'm the type of guy that just put a hole above my right eye with a pop rivet gun, but I've been able to somehow handle (with the help of this great forum) the maintenance and repair of two Goldwings (an 81' 1100 with 160,000 miles, and a 96' Aspencade with 80,000 miles and running like a Swiss watch when it destroyed itself against the side of a Michigan whitetail deer); I'm now on my third, an 1800, and I hope to do maintenance on it until I die. I've rebuilt forks, brakes, exchanged timing belts, swapped tires, wired for trailers........ if I can do it, anybody can.

True, there are easier bikes to work on, but what's the payoff with them? More discomfort while riding, less reliability.... save the major procedures for the winter months.....
 

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True, there are easier bikes to work on, but what's the payoff with them? More discomfort while riding, less reliability.... save the major procedures for the winter months.....

Agree with CJ, do the major repairs in the off season when there is less pressure to go for a ride.

Slow and easy, document your tear down with lots of photos so you can review when you are re-assembling. I like to use zip-lock bags for all the small stuff, label with the name and the # that it came off the bike. That way all you have to do is reverse the numbers, ie highest number goes back on the bike first and #1 is the last to be installed.


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