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I've got a much cleaner timing belt cover for my '83 GL1100 than what came with her and plan to swap it during my winter clean-up.

I don't know if my timing belt has ever been changed, but I've been told it should be done around the 50K mark (my bike has 62K now).

Would anyone happen to have pictures that show an old worn belt side by side with a new one (or even before/after pictures of a timing belt change)? I'd like to look at my belt when I change the cover to decide if I need it changed before the upcoming season or if it can be put off till next year. I've already made arrangements to have my front forks serviced (progressive springs, new seals, etc.) and don't know if I could afford the additional funds to do the timing belt at the same time, unless they look dangerously worn.

I know this site is full of D-I-Yers, but I alsoknow my (current) limitations and prefer to have someone do these particular jobsfor me, so please keep responses limited to posting pictures of what I'm asking for and not instructions on doing it myself.

I've had nothing but great advice from this site and it is ALL much appreciated, but just reading some of the other posts, I see how easily topics can get a little off track.

Thanks!
 

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Your belts could look good and still be quite brittle due to age... Unless you know that they have been changed in the last6 or8 years, then it is time to change them regardless of what they look like...
 

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You cannot go by looks on the timing belts. You might get 100,000 maybe 200,000 out of them or 55,000. No way to know, so if you don't have the record of it being changed recently then change them. They are almost if not 30 yrs old, the rubber brakes down. These are Interference motors which means a vale will hit the piston when out of time which is what happens when a belt brakes.
Do you feel lucky today, each day you ride it is spinning the chamber with 1 bullet in it. Your choice, @$60 at Napa for belts, or @$? New head, maybe a piston, or motor swap out.
I have seen holes in pistons from a valve tagging and snapping off and going clang clang clang clang..... BANG!
There was a motor shown just last week in a post where it had happened. Do a search.
 

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+1. If you don't know their age, replace 'em. May as well replace the radiator hoses and thermostat while you are in there.

The trick to the 1100's timing belt is that the right cam shaft (rider's right) likes to rotate a little when the engine is at TDC per instructions. Helps to have an assistant holding that cam wheel while you install the belts. You can change the belts/covers with the radiator in place. Easier with a "special tool." The belts, hoses, thermostat & even the radiator cap can all be replaced with parts from NAPA or similar car suppliers. You don't need to pay Mother Honda's prices for these unless you really want OEM.

Let us know if you need more details on parts/procedures.
 

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+1, again. They may look good but you never know when they will break. And, being an interference engine, if it does break there could be damage to the valves and other parts. Check out the link from this site on changing the belts. It's for a GL1000, but you'll get an idea of what's involved.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum9/17422.html
 

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First there are 2 belts and they are inexpensive and relatively easy to change. Especially with the cover off. The whole job can be done for less than $40. Read about it on this site and don't be afraid to do it. It is almost as simple as when you take it apart make sure nothing turns and put it back together the same way. Not quite but close.:action:
 

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First there are 2 belts and they are inexpensive and relatively easy to change. Especially with the cover off. The whole job can be done for less than $40. Read about it on this site and don't be afraid to do it. It is almost as simple as when you take it apart make sure nothing turns and put it back together the sam way. Not quite but close.:action:
 

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I've learned from my experience on my 1200 and then on my 1500 that there is a lot of labor just to get a good look at the belts. So, since then, I have always worked from the principle that if you are going to look at them you might as well put in the extra time needed to go ahead and change them.

Most people don't mention it, but you might consider changing your cam and crank seals too. You're going to be right there.
 

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A good looking belt is not broken. A bad looking belt is broken. Pretty simple. Best time to do the belts is when you have the front forks off. Once the forks and timming covers are off its like 10 to 20 minutes to change out the belts.That's never having done it before. It's just that easy. While the belts on a goldwing are very reliable you just never know and after 30 yrs why take the chance.
Wilf
 

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You don't need the forks off.
 

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Here is a pic of a belt that I removed from a 75 1000 a while back. Note that it is split right down the middle. Very rarely do you see this . I dont think it was ever changed and spent 30 odd years rotting under its cover. That bike was still running but it probably would not have been much longer. As already mentioned though, most belts "look good" but!! If you dont have documented proof that they have been changed within the past few years than change them. It is cheap insurance.
 

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when i bought my bike about 4yrs ago i never even looked at the timing belts didnt care joined this website and saw that infact they were belts i thought it was a chain


anyway i removed the belts installed new one the old ones still looked brand new but i didnt know the last time they were replaced, so i went ahead and did it yeah it only cost me about 50 for both belts but money well spent

if you dont know the last time a critical engine part was changed either on a bike or a car my advice is just do it at least then you will know.
 
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