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Discussion Starter #1
following on Facebook, saw a guy who had just bought a primo looking, gorgeous bike.

Custom seat, etc.....

he didn't know much about it when he bought it, and decided to jump on it and ride it straight home.

here is what he said:

Truly gruesome sight. She didn't make it home on her own
follow up talk leaned into a broken Timing Belt from the sound of how it stopped running.
 

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There's never any symptoms before a timing belt fail, they work perfectly right up until they snap.
 

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Be interesting to know since Honda recommends Miles not age in the manual check.
That bike is an 1100 last year they were made was in 1983. The Honda recommendation for timing belt is based on miles. They most likely based that on x # miles per year or approximately 10 years. Changing timing belts before the recommended miles based on years would be using common sense. So if they were original belts just do some basic math and they would have lasted more than times longer than expected even if it only had half of the miles recommended.


Rubber will deteriorate over time.
 

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That bike is an 1100 last year they were made was in 1983. The Honda recommendation for timing belt is based on miles. They most likely based that on x # miles per year or approximately 10 years. Changing timing belts before the recommended miles based on years would be using common sense. So if they were original belts just do some basic math and they would have lasted more than times longer than expected even if it only had half of the miles recommended.


Rubber will deteriorate over time.
Thanks for the lesson but you didn't answer my question.
 

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If there is anything good (and there isn't) the bike is a 4 cylinder. With a 4 cylinder it is possible to break the belt and not do any damage. Odds are against it but it is possible. Also the damage on a 4 cylinder is usually less than a 6 cylinder. Hopefully he has some luck. Hasn't so far. :(
 

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If he's lucky he just bent a couple valves, unlucky there's holes in two pistons and the head is trash.......
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the lesson but you didn't answer my question.

we don't know how many miles.

I just saw a post on Facebook, and he mentioned that he had just bought this bike.

he had posted its' picture full face as he first saw it....
oh it is gorgeous, but after that, no one posted again, and it disappears,
I searched for many hours trying to find that post.

anyway, he never told us how many miles.
just that he found it on craigslist, went to see it, fell in love with it because it looks brand new.

started it up and rode it home.... well almost, the timing belt snapped and engine stopped.

I looked at his homepage, he is about my age or so, in his 70s with a lot of grandkids showing on his homepage. don't remember his FB name now.
 

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If he's lucky he just bent a couple valves, unlucky there's holes in two pistons and the head is trash.......
Respectfully that does not have to be right. Those two cylinders are 180 degrees apart. So when the one piston is at the bottom of it's stroke, on compression, both valves are closed. That cylinder will have no valves open for one complete turn, 360 degrees. The other affected cylinder must be on it's power stroke and both valves are closed. The piston will go down on it's power stroke (180 degrees) and the exhaust valve will start to open. Remember though there is no danger until the piston reaches the top of it's stroke where it can collide with the slightly open exhaust valve. That means there is almost 360 degrees of travel where there is no danger in theory. The problem is if you are going down the highway as he was so many things are happening and for so long that in reality it has likely or almost certainly done some damage. I have fixed a lot of broken timing chains and belts and I would guess 90 percent have internal damage. One in particular comes to mind where the chain broke while cranking the engine to start it. No damage. Just a new chain.
If I had to bet I would say Denver is right but it is not always a certainty. Especially on the 4 cylinder engines.
 

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I agree, possible to have no damage at all. At an idle if the cam comes to a quick stop where all valves are closed there will be no damage. Odds of that happening at speed, though, are very small. Most common result seems to be bent valves. I've heard where valves broke, resulting in piston holes and ruined head.
 

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I agree, possible to have no damage at all. At an idle if the cam comes to a quick stop where all valves are closed there will be no damage. d.
The valves in either head are never all closed at the same time.
 

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I agree, possible to have no damage at all. At an idle if the cam comes to a quick stop where all valves are closed there will be no damage. Odds of that happening at speed, though, are very small. Most common result seems to be bent valves. I've heard where valves broke, resulting in piston holes and ruined head.
Yeah. we can all agree it is never a good thing when the belt breaks but it is worth 5 minute check to be sure there is damage before taking it all apart. I have disassembled too many things to find nothing wrong. I really don't understand why interference engines even exist. Make the valve pockets a little deeper and if the compression is not what you want add somewhere else. I would like to think it is not that easy but I really don't know any real good reason.
I just finished a terrible job on a Ford Escape transmission. Ford wanted to get better fuel mileage so they put in a really small charge pump and low viscosity ATF. First question is how much fuel does that save? The real question is what happens to the transmission when things wear just a bit and the valve body bypasses just a little bit too much oil and the small pump has no reserve? Almost $5,0000 if you have it done. How much gas could you buy with $5,000? Darn car companies and government! :)
 

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I really don't understand why interference engines even exist.
You could say the same about timing belts. Chains generally last the life of most engines, so why even mess with a belt and it's need for seals at each shaft and a cover to keep out debris. It's all about $$$.
 
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