Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

I know this topic gets beat to death on forums but I was wondering if, under ordinary operating conditions (meaning not exposed to excess heat, chemicals, etc), whether the Honda timing belts will actually break from age rather than last for the 60,000 changeout cycle. I know there's lots of conjectural arguments about "why take the risk - it's so cheap to change them" (not really) and definitively authoritative responses like "if they're over six years old, you're on borrowed time.":gunhead: While there are probabilistic modelling methodologies that can be used to make reasoned guesses -short of that exercise -I'm posing the question:

Has anyone actually had one break because of age rather than miles?

One reasonI ask is that when I went with a used GoldWing (86 GL1200I), part of my decision process revolved around this issue,but the Wing won out because it's head & shoulders better than the competition overall, IMHO. I actually switched from Honda cars to Nissan a few years ago partly because worry used to keep me up at night thinking about the thing snapping. The cost was not cheap to replace and when you're a high mileage driver/rider, these changeout cycles occur with greater frequency than for the casual driver/rider.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
42 Posts
imported post

I think Nissan cars have timing belts too...at least some of them. I'm sorry to hear that worry was keeping you up at night...seems we have more important things to worry about in this world...(like London, this morning perhaps).

Timing belts are a part of life these days...they seem to be much more robust than some people give them credit for. I have seen many cars towed into my (Honda only) auto shop with broken belts and the carnage that can ensue in the aftermath of such an event with bent valves, etc. Yes, I have seen them fail before their specified mileage maximums.

I haven't had one break on my 10 year old Aspencade (yet)...and I'm thinking about replacing them soon.

I don't know why you wouldn't just replace them, pro-actively...why wait (and worry) for one to break and leave you stranded. They are much easier to replace on a Wing then they are in a car...for sure! I think of them as required service, just like tire replacement.

Just my opinion, of course.

Greg
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Not all engines with timing belts will have a disaster when the belts break, many have sufficient clearance between the valves and pistons that nothing happens except the engine quits. In the interest of better breathing and combustion chamber design some engines do initiate immediate partial disassembly when the belt goes. The Goldwing is one of those. I wouldn't want a belt to be much more than five years old or over 40-50k miles whichever came first. It just isn't worth the risk and possible expense.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,882 Posts
imported post

exavid wrote:
some engines do initiate immediate partial disassembly when the belt goes.
now that sounds like how a doctor might explain something... I remember once hearing a family told that the patient had a cardiac arrythmia that was not compatable with life...
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

rcmatt007 wrote:
exavid wrote:
some engines do initiate immediate partial disassembly when the belt goes.
now that sounds like how a doctor might explain something... I remember once hearing a family told that the patient had a cardiac arrythmia that was not compatable with life...
It sounds better than saying the pistons and valves beat the crap out of each other!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

Curt Miller wrote:
I know this topic gets beat to death on forums but I was wondering if, under ordinary operating conditions (meaning not exposed to excess heat, chemicals, etc), whether the Honda timing belts will actually break from age rather than last for the 60,000 changeout cycle. I know there's lots of conjectural arguments about "why take the risk - it's so cheap to change them" (not really) and definitively authoritative responses like "if they're over six years old, you're on borrowed time.":gunhead: While there are probabilistic modelling methodologies that can be used to make reasoned guesses -short of that exercise -I'm posing the question:

Has anyone actually had one break because of age rather than miles?

One reasonI ask is that when I went with a used GoldWing (86 GL1200I), part of my decision process revolved around this issue,but the Wing won out because it's head & shoulders better than the competition overall, IMHO. I actually switched from Honda cars to Nissan a few years ago partly because worry used to keep me up at night thinking about the thing snapping. The cost was not cheap to replace and when you're a high mileage driver/rider, these changeout cycles occur with greater frequency than for the casual driver/rider.

Curt, I can't speak of the Honda motorcycles as I just haven't ever seen a belt fail on one of those. I have been in the auto testing business for many years (before timing belts were even used) & seen a few failures there. On some 4 cylinder automobiles you can almost set your watch by the belt failure mileage & on others it never seems to happen. The good news (at least auto wise) is the belt almost never just snaps but instead loses a belt tooth or two & slips timing position. This usually happens on initial start up or in very cold weather.

Obviously oil or other contaminants on the belt can hasten their failure as well as running mis-adjusted or in a high ozone area.

In todays world of poor quality control & sloppy shipping practices it's also possible to replace an older still serviceable belt with a new belt that could fail from a defect or shipping damage.

Twisty
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

I haven't seen one fail either although someone on the forum had a belt in the early stages of disinigration. I think a 5 year or 50,000 mile change out is worthwhile because it give a chance to look at your tensioners, see if there's any leaking from the cam or crankshafts, and of course check the belts. I'm sure there are plenty who've gone 100,000miles or more with the original belts, but I like to look atthings more often than that. Especially things that cost a lot if they go bad.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
imported post

I bought my 83 last year with 43,000 miles and with the original timing belts:jumper:. I had no problem with the belts but replaced immediately.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
708 Posts
imported post

I purchased my Wing going on 2 years ago. I was told the belts had been replaced about a year (and little milage) before. I only put about 5k miles per year (lately) on each bike so I'm sure there wasn't many miles on the belts. But my problem is I didn't really know. Hearsay? I can't just hope someone told me right, so I replaced them!! Now I know for sure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
imported post

I had to replace a leaky seal on a camshaft this past week (a learning experience for this motard) and while I was there I replaced the belts (why not if I'm already there?). I did, however, discover that one belt was new and one looked original part-ish. Made me kind of wonder...

Iknow that the dealers around here quoted me $85 per timing belt and the NAPA belt was $15 each.

After doing this the first time, I can see me doing it again out of prevention rather than letting it go by.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
241 Posts
imported post

Ruaidh wrote:
I had to replace a leaky seal on a camshaft this past week (a learning experience for this motard) and while I was there I replaced the belts (why not if I'm already there?). I did, however, discover that one belt was new and one looked original part-ish. Made me kind of wonder...

Iknow that the dealers around here quoted me $85 per timing belt and the NAPA belt was $15 each.

After doing this the first time, I can see me doing it again out of prevention rather than letting it go by.
I agree with the rest of the group, I got my wing with 74K on the clock and the PO said he had replaced them a while back ago. The belts are 30 a set at NAPA, I just picked up a set and also getting a small amount of water seepage from the weep hole in the water pump. So as soon a I can get a weekend off, I picked up a waterpump seal kit I'm doing both. It's and inexpensive preventative act you can do! Listen to these guys, they are the best on the planet!:clapper::jumper::cooler:. And Welcom the the Best Goldwing forum on the planet!:banana:
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

77GL1 wrote:
I purchased my Wing going on 2 years ago. I was told the belts had been replaced about a year (and little milage) before. I only put about 5k miles per year (lately) on each bike so I'm sure there wasn't many miles on the belts. But my problem is I didn't really know. Hearsay? I can't just hope someone told me right, so I replaced them!! Now I know for sure.
I wasn't positive when the belts were changed on either Goldwing I've had so I change them. That way I KNOW how long they've been there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
626 Posts
imported post

Curt Miller wrote:
I know this topic gets beat to death on forums but I was wondering if, under ordinary operating conditions (meaning not exposed to excess heat, chemicals, etc), whether the Honda timing belts will actually break from age rather than last for the 60,000 changeout cycle. I know there's lots of conjectural arguments about "why take the risk - it's so cheap to change them" (not really) and definitively authoritative responses like "if they're over six years old, you're on borrowed time.":gunhead: While there are probabilistic modelling methodologies that can be used to make reasoned guesses -short of that exercise -I'm posing the question:

Has anyone actually had one break because of age rather than miles?
Theree's a couple of examples in this thread;

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=1865&forum_id=1&highlight=belt+broke
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
imported post

Ruaidh wrote:
I had to replace a leaky seal on a camshaft this past week (a learning experience for this motard) and while I was there I replaced the belts (why not if I'm already there?). I did, however, discover that one belt was new and one looked original part-ish. Made me kind of wonder...

Iknow that the dealers around here quoted me $85 per timing belt and the NAPA belt was $15 each.

After doing this the first time, I can see me doing it again out of prevention rather than letting it go by.

I keep reading that you guys in the USA can get timing belts for around $15 per belt at NAPA. When I was considering belts, I called NAPA here in Halifax and was quoted $48 per belt. That seems like just too much differential. Are we talking pt no 250274 .

The guy DID say per belt but he may have been mistaken and meant per pair.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
imported post

Yes, I do believe that's the correct NAPA part number. I bought two in early July anfd they cost about $39 for the pair with tax.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
410 Posts
imported post

I just got 2 timing belts from Napa # 250070 for about $41.00CAD

I will try putting them on this weekend

Prosso
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
410 Posts
imported post

I should also say that the NAPA belts that I picked up at GATES Belts

Napa # 250070 is the same as GATES # T070

Check out;http:

//www.gates.com/part_interchange/index.cfm?location_id=3286http:

//www.gates.com/part_locator/index.cfm?location_id=3598

http://www.goldwing-world.com/gl-1200.htm#Timing
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
58 Posts
imported post

years ago i picked up a 1975 goldwing back in 88 i think it was has less then 15k on the clock and on the way home after buying it i had a belt let go :Xon the right side bent both valves right overin both cylindersthank god no damages to the pistons
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
505 Posts
imported post

I brought a 92 1500 down from the states with 25000 miles and promised myself I would change the timing belts in the winter as I couldn't wait to ride it. However after 2500 miles we purchased a new 1800 and the 1500 was put to one side. Anyway last weekend it poured down so I thought time to bite the bullet and with nothing better to do I decided tochange the belts. Thebeltson the bike looked as good as new if a little dusty but they were so slack it is a mystery as to how they were working at all. Replacing them was simplicity itself taking no time at all. Although the bike does not have a lot of miles on it , it is still 13 years old and for the sake of nz$60 cheap insurance I think.

Regards to all,

John S
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top