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Timing belts snap, timing chains wear out and get sloppy and sometimes just finally fail, sometimes it's neither.

Late '70s, had a '73 Mustang, just a mild "Grande", 302, 2bbl, C-4, "ride car". Kind of a copper color with white vinyl roof that was a PITA to keep white, 73,xxx miles when I sold it to a girl I knew. Her dad liked it, was a pretty car in nice shape, she loved the car. Week later on way to "Holiday Lake", she and her sister, timing chain broke, bent valves, her dad had it fixed within a few days ... before I even heard about it. I felt bad about it but who knew? I even offered some money back but he wouldn't accept it. She drove it until long after she got married.

Early '70s, New London Dragstrip, '65 GTO, fresh built 400, a bit of gear, street tires still, was running really good that day, staged, yellows …, drop clutch after last yellow, Hays 40 lb steel FW got her going, see green, no red, feather throttle, tires hooked, first gear, second gear, third gear, forth gear, cam bolt fell out and wedged in between sprocket & chain, cam stopped when the chain busted in an instant, instant dead quiet, push in clutch, neutral, drifted through the lights, still in the 13s.

Towed "the goat" home with "the wagon" ('68 Plymouth Satelite Sport Wagon, 383-4bbl, no slouch) … & before supper, damage assessed, pistons barely marked, only bent 4 intake & 4 exhaust valves, got spare "better" R-A heads in place (were going on soon anyway), new roller style timing set, locktite on new cam bolt, all in time for cruising the main drag in town that night.

Repairs were upgrades already planned and all parts & gaskets were "on hand", but the bolt falling out changed the timeline, forced the issue. Other repairs over time were not always so convenient.
 

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I am old enough to have worked on the first GL 1000 in Gloucestershire UK, one of the first on the road in UK.
Back then, even in the original Honda manual there was NO recommendation for timing belt change and in the copy of Honda UK's service department manual i have it is a hand wrtten additional note, 80,000 miles if i remember correctly.
This one was so early that there was no grease nipple on the final.drive casing and the spline "joints" on end of drive shaft and rive input wore out 9 months(25,000 ish) went on to do 80,000 in three years had a new,used, drive unit when wheel bearing play was neglected, a rear tyre every 5,000 cant remember how long front lasted but bike was serviced on time or early religeously
 

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The Honda cars of that era didn't have a timing belt service interval either. There were not interference engines so just put on a new belt and go.
 

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'85 Toyota Camry w 2L 4cyl and 350,000 miles, Non-interference engine. I've changed several timing belts over the years, try to do them around 80K miles. Changed the belt immediately after buying the car in 1990 with 97K mi, under the hood with engine running I heard "flap-flap-flap" noise coming from the timing cover, the edge of the belt had shreded and was flapping around. The replacement didn't make it to 80K, the internal cords along one edge of the belt let go after 25K miles, belt didn't break but it DID jump 5 cogs... And most recently the belt simply broke at 75K miles. Still looked like new except for the break. Put on another belt and good to go again.
 

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'85 Toyota Camry w 2L 4cyl and 350,000 miles, Non-interference engine. I've changed several timing belts over the years, try to do them around 80K miles. Changed the belt immediately after buying the car in 1990 with 97K mi, under the hood with engine running I heard "flap-flap-flap" noise coming from the timing cover, the edge of the belt had shreded and was flapping around. The replacement didn't make it to 80K, the internal cords along one edge of the belt let go after 25K miles, belt didn't break but it DID jump 5 cogs... And most recently the belt simply broke at 75K miles. Still looked like new except for the break. Put on another belt and good to go again.
I changed one on a running Volvo inline 6 cylinder. It had 158K on the belt and still was running fine. Terribly cracked and I tore it in pieces with my bare hands. Also saw some that broke that looked fine. Wonder why Honda says inspect them. You never know.
 

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They also say regrease wheel bearings but i wouldnt put one back that i had to beat out!
The original bearings have a seal on the outside so they have to be pulled out to relube. Would be foolish to put them back in. Get new bearings with seals on both sides.
 

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On my 1200, I drilled a 1/8" hole from near the rear brake rotor side of the wheel aimed into the void between the wheel bearing, then drilled, tapped for 1/4-28 and put n a grease fitting, pumped grease in from there. Used grease on drill bit & tap too, to hold chips.
 
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