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I have just purchased a 1986 GW1200A with 70,000 miles and ideas as to when i need to change the timing belts or any other things i need to look for ..
 

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if you have no idea when or if they have been changed, now is a good time.... there are LOTS of threads on this, including instructions, and esepecially about making sure that when you put them back on everything is lined up.

otherwise, I would change all the fluids, including brake fluid

welcome to the forum
 

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:waving::waving:Welcome to the Best Goldwing Site on the Internet leolarry!:waving::waving:

Can'tadd much on what rcmatt007 just posted other than to take a look at the brake pads and the oil level in the final drive.
 

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Hey leolarry :waving: [shadow=green]WELCOME[/shadow] :clapper:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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Time to change is RIGHT NOW!!!

you will also note an inprovement in performance.

Don't forget to turn engine over 360 by hand before trying to start after changing belts
 

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ccsailor wrote:
Time to change is RIGHT NOW!!!

you will also note an inprovement in performance.

Don't forget to turn engine over 360 by hand before trying to start after changing belts
Ya better give it at least TWO full turns at the crank, one turn won't take the valves through the full cycle.
 

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EXAVID???? twice around.... next you will tell me there is a chain in the drive mechinism too!!!!:baffled::banana::cooldevil:
 

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Welcome to a great site!!!!! :waving: :waving: :waving:
 

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Hi,

I changed the belts on my 1200 because I didn't know the history of the bike. I used belts from NAPA (250070) Much cheaper than Honda wants.

The old belts looked pretty good, but still, didn't know how long they were there so I changed them.

I also changed all the fluids and filters.....bike runs much better.

TOJ
 

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get a clymer or hayes manual... they aren't that hard to replace, mostly time consuming. it is easiest if you remove the raditor, but you can do with by just loosening the raditor and pulling it forward. Once again, if you do not know when things were done, I would remove radiator and replace the hoses at that time
 

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 If you are a fairly good wrencher... Belts are a long saturday morning experience... the hardest part is getting the new belts... or more properly the tooth position  on the new belts  lined up Exactly right  The engine tends to try to move one belt  by a notch  as you install/forums/images/emoticons/tongue.gif ... You can save several $$$ by using NAPA , or Gates  equivalent belts./forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif... and to help  LeoLarry relax , just a bit...  when I changed my belts last fall.. I had a similar experience to most other 1200 owners  I have talked to ... the belts were  "old" looking ,  and a bit gungy ... but doing just fine/forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif....  and mine looked as if they could go another 40 000... but its for piece of mind./forums/images/emoticons/confused.gif.. The 1200 engine is an interference engine ... which means, if a belt goes... a piston and a Valve WILL try to occupy the same space... at the same time./forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif.. OUCH !!! SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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Hi,

By all means, remove the radiator.. I changed belts on a1100 once with it in place.

On my 1200, i wanted to change the coolant , and clean evrything I could..

I didn't follow every step in the book. I never removed the timing cap on top of the engine. Just lined up the timing marks and pulleys. As the cam on the right side wanted to rotate, I put the belt on while holding it in place with a box wrench, a third hand would have been nice!! I tried 3 or 4 times before I had it right. Take your time. Turn the engine over a couple times to make sure nothing binds, if it does, start over.

TOJ
 

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TOJ wrote:
Hi,

By all means, remove the radiator.. I changed belts on a1100 once with it in place.

On my 1200, i wanted to change the coolant , and clean evrything I could..

I didn't follow every step in the book. I never removed the timing cap on top of the engine. Just lined up the timing marks and pulleys. As the cam on the right side wanted to rotate, I put the belt on while holding it in place with a box wrench, a third hand would have been nice!! I tried 3 or 4 times before I had it right. Take your time. Turn the engine over a couple times to make sure nothing binds, if it does, start over.

TOJ
If you mark the position of the two cam wheels accurately with a felt tip marker and mark the engine adjacent to the cam wheels that's really all you need. The crank pulley won't move on you, there's plenty of friction to hold it. When you put the new belts on just make sure the marks are all still the same as when you took the belts off. I usually turn the crank until the two pulleys have the UP marks right side up and at 10 and 3 O'clock, but it's not important. One caution, this method is assuming the bike is running fine and the valve timing is correct to start with. If you suspect otherwise set the timing by the book.

The tension on the belts is better a wee bit loose than too tight. If too tight you may get some whistling or squeaking noises when running. Inspect the tensioners for smoothness and play. Often you will find you can't get quite the same positioning as the original belts. A half or 3/4 tooth off isn't unusual. The old belts do stretch a little. Once you have the new belts on turn the crankshaft pulley using the bolt at least two full turns slowly with the spark plugs out to make sure there's no error such that the pistons and valves might meet. Button her up and that's it.

I prefer to remove the radiator, it gives better access and lets you see other areas to inspect.
 

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Hi,

Exavid said it better than I did:D......bya manual, you'll need it sooner or later.



TOJ
 

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Where is the timing cap on top of engine, is that where I will find the T1 mark the book talks about, someone had felt tipped the camshaft sprockets and the crank but I removed the crank bolt as I am converting to a alternator and belts were right there so why not, but the felt mark on the crank was on the front beveled guide which does not have a keyway notched out so not sure of posistion
 

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billymc38 wrote:
Where is the timing cap on top of engine, is that where I will find the T1 mark the book talks about, someone had felt tipped the camshaft sprockets and the crank but I removed the crank bolt as I am converting to a alternator and belts were right there so why not, but the felt mark on the crank was on the front beveled guide which does not have a keyway notched out so not sure of posistion
Are you saying---Where is the timing cap, on top of the engine?? The answer is yes, it is in there at about the center on the flattish section of the engine----about the size of a Canadian Toonie (if you have ever seen one)and it has a slot in it for a screwdriver. Rotate the crank until the T1 mark appears and then try to line it up with the marks on the side. be aware of parallax error.
 

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Yes, the timing cap is on the top of the motor. You can access it on theleft side of the bike. You will need a large flat head screwdriver to losen it. There is another cap on the same side of the bike on the back of the stator. Take that cap off and you can acces the bolt on the stator to turn the motor over by hand with a ratchet and 12mm socket.That way you can look into the timing cap hole to see the T makings on the fly wheel while you turn the motor over. just make sure you only turn the motor over clock wise, or you will losen the stator bolt....cheers!!
 

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Theres a really good how to!!pic by pic on here or at thegoldwingdocs web page it helped like WOW!:readit:i just printed it out .
 

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I have a 86 1200 sei the only thing I see close to what you are talking about where the t 1 timing mark is located is a large aluminum wing nut looking bolt with what looks like a vaccum line in the center of it, is this where the t 1 timing mark can be found, it is located more to the center on the left side just behind the srator?
 
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