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My '77 GL1000 is still running like a dog, and most every symptom I still have points towards "ignition not being advanced far enough".

Other than not being able to get the second base-plate locking screw loosened off the plate (damn him!) I'm also stumped by not being able to find a glass-cap so I can see the timing marks with a strobe light.

Anyone got suggestions for a supplier or alternative part number please? Will also pay good money for any spares out there!


Thanks.

PS: will I get a decent result off the "static method" using a bulb hooked up to the battery, or am I correct in being fixated with the "dynamic method"? And yes, I did swallow the shop manual ... :oops:
 

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Timing inspection cap is still available from honda. Regardless, it's MUCH easier to do the static timing with a test light. You can set it quite well -- mine are bang on. Even with the timing glass, you have to drain some oil off to see the marks, which is a pain. Static works great.
 

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hirsty wrote:
My '77 GL1000 is still running like a dog, and most every symptom I still have points towards "ignition not being advanced far enough".

Other than not being able to get the second base-plate locking screw loosened off the plate (damn him!) I'm also stumped by not being able to find a glass-cap so I can see the timing marks with a strobe light.

Anyone got suggestions for a supplier or alternative part number please? Will also pay good money for any spares out there!


Thanks.

PS: will I get a decent result off the "static method" using a bulb hooked up to the battery, or am I correct in being fixated with the "dynamic method"? And yes, I did swallow the shop manual ... :oops:
Hirsty, you could always line the dynamic mark up with the engine off, then pull a timing belt cover & put your own marks on the crank pulley & case or cam pulley & head then use those marks as the dynamic marks.

Personally I prefer using a dynamic timing as that allows the timing to be set at advance & also allows you to check that the advance is working correctly.

Twisty
 

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I check using both methods.  The part is listed as "plug inspection cover" and is #07999-3710001.  Had to be special ordered through my Honda dealer.
 

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I always wondered why Honda didn't choose a clear glass for the sight-glass instead of that yellow rubbish. It surely has to be easier to see through clear glass than murky yellow.
 

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I always wondered why Honda didn't choose a clear glass for the sight-glass instead of that yellow rubbish. It surely has to be easier to see through clear glass than murky yellow.
I've had mine since 1976 and it is clear. I do agree whole heartedly with Twisty on using the dynamic method over the static. Maybe I just fumbled it but every time I tried to use the static method on my '75 I couldn't make it come out right. Hirsty, if you cannot wait until you get the site glass, you can make do with a small piece of clear plastic (or glass) and some plumbers putty to stick the glass over the timing hole. Be careful not to get the putty into the engine and as Mag says, it will be easier to see the timing marks if you drain off a couple of quarts of oil. The engine will be OK running on two quarts while setting the timing.
 

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gaswing wrote:
I always wondered why Honda didn't choose a clear glass for the sight-glass instead of that yellow rubbish. It surely has to be easier to see through clear glass than murky yellow.
Mine is clear as well. Maybe the ones you seen are stained and gone yellow? :waving:
 

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mine is clear... well at least I think it is, it has been off and sitting in a drawer from when I put on an electronic ignition
 

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They are all clear ones. If you have one that looks yellow it's probably from the oil going all scummy with lack of changes.,
 

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Though it takes a bit more effort it seems to me that Twisty's suggestion of putting marks on the crank shaft pulley makes a lot of sense, a lot easier to see too. It would be easy to put marks for the advanced and retarded positions and watch how well the advance works. I'll do that when I fire up the 1100 to check out the vacuum and centrifugal advance function.
 

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Can you actually see the marks with one of these? I wasted money a few years back for a similar plug for HDs, and I never could see the marks, even with the plug right up against the flywheel. I ended up just static timing it.
 

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I made one of some acrylic I had laying around (or maybe it was polycarb). Anyway, I spun one out on my lathe and used it very successfully on my '77 GL1000, but ony to check what I had done staticly. Oil pickup was a problem, and as suggested you should drain about 1/2 quart to avoid that. I used an old inductive light that I've had for over a decade and it worked fine. I used it outdoors on a fairly bright day and could still see the frozen marks.

Just don''t do like I did immediately afterward - remove the clear plug and forget to put the regular plug back in, then take a test ride and only find the fault when noticing the warm feeling of the oil on my leg. Only lost ~ 1/2 quart, but was cleaning oil off (even after car wash) weeks later.
 

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They're about $20 new from Honda. A buddy of mine just picked one up for his Wing.

When I installed electronic ignition, Itimed it using the static method, then played with it a bit to get it just right (ended up advancing the timing just a hair). The bike idles and runs great.Getting the carbs right on a GL1000 is 90% of the battle.
 

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On old British bikes we advanced the timing until it would just ping in a high gear on a slight incline. We would then back the timing off a very small amount. Some say it is a better method than setting the timing statically or dynamically as it caters for wear, fuel type etc. Cheers John ('83 GL1100I)
 

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Not to mention you could trim the timing from the handlebars of most of the old bikes.
 
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