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Got a new (to me) GL1500. Really nice bike. Trying to figure out proper tire pressure. In my previous Honda VTX, Honda's recommendation was out to lunch. Honda recommended 33 and 40-42 was best. What is best for the Goldwing? Solo and heavy?

Also, where should the rear suspension air setting be, for solo and for heavy 2-up? I am currently trying 0 psi for solo and 40 psi (measured on the centerstand with no pressure on the bike) for heavy two-up. Is this close?

Thanks, Mark.
 

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Don't know what brand tires you are running but Dunlop recommends 38 front and 41 rear. I ran these pressures in several sets with good results.

I am now on my 2nd set of Avon's and running 45 front and 50 rear. The Avon's are a little heavier constructed tire and need to be pumped up more for good results.

I would think around 10 psi solo and around 45 psi two-up.

But I would recommend you experiment with different settings to find what suits your riding style.

The above assumes (bad word) that you have the stock rear suspension. If it's Progressive suspension like mine, then the above recommendations will be different.
 

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DBohrer wrote:
I would think around 10 psi solo and around 45 psi two-up.

But I would recommend you experiment with different settings to find what suits your riding style.

The above assumes (bad word) that you have the stock rear suspension. If it's Progressive suspension like mine, then the above recommendations will be different.
The PO has a very good maintenance log. He lists "progressive springs" as one item he did many years ago, but it appears to be on the front only, if I read his notes right. It says:
Wingding vendor ... Progressive fork springs
motul 15w40 oil in forks

So, I assume this is the front fork springs made progressive, and something around 45 psi two-up is a good starting setting?

Thanks, Mark.
 

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By the way, I'm probably going to switch to the Michelin Pilot GT's when these tires are up. Anyone have an idea of proper pressure for those?

THanks.
 

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busdriver wrote:
For Elite 3 tires Dunlop recommends 36 front and 40 rear.
For the Elite 2 it is 33F AND 41R
http://www.dunlopmotorcycle.com/fitmentguide.asp
That's interesting, Tony Mills who was a Dunlop tire representative conducted tire seminars at various rallies I attended throughout the 1990's. I was running Elite II's and he recommended the 38 front and 41 rear. I found that to give the best performance and wear over several sets of tires. I usually got around 25 - 27k miles from each set. I also ran a couple sets of Elite III's with the same pressures and good results. It worked for me...!

Experience has taught me that you can't always go by what Honda lists as recommended tire pressure. Or sometimes what is listed on web sites. Honda in particular lists low psi's in order to give the rider a very cushioned ride. They want their bikes to feel very comfortable. But that does not achieve the best performance or wear.
 

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SailorKane wrote:
DBohrer wrote:
I would think around 10 psi solo and around 45 psi two-up.

But I would recommend you experiment with different settings to find what suits your riding style.

The above assumes (bad word) that you have the stock rear suspension. If it's Progressive suspension like mine, then the above recommendations will be different.
The PO has a very good maintenance log. He lists "progressive springs" as one item he did many years ago, but it appears to be on the front only, if I read his notes right. It says:
Wingding vendor ... Progressive fork springs
motul 15w40 oil in forks

So, I assume this is the front fork springs made progressive, and something around 45 psi two-up is a good starting setting?

Thanks, Mark.


There has been a lot of Progressive Springs installed at Wing Ding's over the years. There are usually at least two vendors there that are doing Progressive Springs. Yes, it would be the front forks. Usually with Progressive fork springs, the recommended fork oil weight is 15 wt. However, sometimes that will result in a more harsh ride, depending on rider/co-rider and other weight on the bike. I am running Progressive front fork springs with 10 wt fork oil and good results. I know some folks who run 7 - 8 wt fork oil with Progressive Springs. However, I am not a full figured guy.

A little tid bit about Progressive springs. The first generation of them were two springs in each fork leg. Then they came out with a later generation that is only one spring in each fork leg.

PS: I am also running Progressive suspension on the rear of my bike. A little on the expensive side but it greatly improves the ride and handling.
 

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SailorKane wrote:
By the way, I'm probably going to switch to the Michelin Pilot GT's when these tires are up. Anyone have an idea of proper pressure for those?

THanks.
One of my riding friends has ran two sets of Michelin Pilot GT's on his 2000 Aspencade. He runs 38 front and 41 rear with good performance and wear. He had 24,000 on the first set and his second set has 22,000 now. He is an average rider, not overly agressive but doesn't poke around either.
 

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SailorKane wrote:
Got a new (to me) GL1500.  Really nice bike.  Trying to figure out proper tire pressure. What is best for the Goldwing?  Solo and heavy? 

Also, where should the rear suspension air setting be, for solo and for heavy 2-up?  I am currently trying 0 psi for solo and 40 psi (measured on the centerstand with no pressure on the bike) for heavy two-up.  Is this close?

Thanks, Mark.

Two great questions as I have the same being a new 1500 owner. Lots of answers on tire pressure but not too much on suspension pressure.

The manual is lacking in recommendations for suspension pressure. Doesn't really say how to check the pressure either, on the side stand, on the center stand, with load etc.

Any advice from he gurus appreciated. Right now I'm checking it with the bike on the side stand unloaded. Can't remember what the metric unit is but I set it at 2.0 when riding with the wife. I think that's around 29 psi.
 

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The rear suspension should be checked with the bike on the center stand (no riders on the bike). The psi will vary depending on rider/co-rider weight and how much weight you carry in the saddlebags and trunk. It's somewhat different for everyone.

A good starting point is around 10 - 15 solo and around 45 two up. Then go from there.

If the bike bottoms out easily, add more psi. If it rides to harsh especially over bumps, lower the psi.
 
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