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Got a new pair of elite 3's delivered to my door yesterday...... look all new and virginal leaning against my hearth......

Anyone here had any experience "busting," mounting, and balancing their own tires?

I read about a guy who made a home machine out of a twenty gallon drum with split heating hose around the rim..... dumped cement in the bottom and stuck up a piece of all-thread in the middle..... uses tire irons..... balances it with the axle on milk crates! Now costs $50 per tire plus in my area for mounting and balancing.......

Any insights appreciated!
 

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Hey Cousin Jack.... I personally just remove my tires and take em and the new tire to a Motorcycle shop (not a honda dealer) for the work... Locally here it is $25 per tire off the bike.... Go to page 3 of the technical forum and see a recent post for this subject ofHarbor Freight....they sell em pretty cheap and there was a link there as well as to how to use it.. (Fred Harmon?)... Other posts here show many different methods for breaking the beads and changing tires from Long 2 x 4's and a bumper of a car to Voodoo dolls and stick pins:shock::dude::dude:The consensus is also to remove the rotor as to minimize any damage in a MC shop..

I guess it depends how often you change the tire and what you're capable of trying that would dictate which you choose

Nick
 

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$50.00 ?????? I think I would check around a bit. I had 2 tires mounted in the spring. I had the wheels off so it only cost me $15.00 per tire to have them mounted and balanced. The place quoted me $45.00 per tire if I rode the bike in and they took them off. That's what I will do next time. As for balancing them yourself, there is a liquid balancer/sealer that you can put in the tires when you mount them. I can't remember the name (Green Goop maybe?) but I'm sure someone will be along with that info soon. You could probably do a search for tire balancing or tire sealant and find the info.
 

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In regards to the sealer/balancing fluid, you might be thinking of Ride-On tire sealant. I'm running it in my Avons as a preventive measure. The company claims that this sealant will seal a hole up to an 1/8" and will allow you to make it to where you can get the tire fixed/replaced. That in itself makes it worth the extra $8 a tire. Plus they do claim that this stuff helps balance your tires. That I can't prove as the Avons ran pretty smoothly without the stuff. Also, so your mechanic won't get his undies in a wad, the stuff is non-toxic, non-flammable(unlike the propane pressurised stuff) and non-corrosive. It washes off with water. I've talked with others who have used it and have had no issues with it.

If you're interested here's the link: http://www.ride-on.com/prod_mot.asp

Regards,

Hobie

I edited the link to take you directly to the motorcycle section.
 

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Cousin Jack

I have always mounted my own but I havea couple tire irons just for that purpose, it takes a bit of grunt work and can be done but it is not a cake walk.Plus I have no way of balancing. If you can find someone at $25.00 a tire to do it, I think you'll consider it a bargin. They will have the proper machines and less likely to damage your rims. To say nothing of the lack of stress to yourself. Just my two cents worth.

:waving:
 

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nickstas wrote:
subject ofHarbor Freight....they sell em pretty cheap and there was a link there as well as to how to use it.. (Fred Harmon?)...
I have at least three friends that have the Harbor Frieght set up and love it. If you go with it do yourself a favor and mount it with some concrete anchors on a solid floor
 

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Goldwings 4 ever wrote:
$50.00 ?????? I think I would check around a bit. I had 2 tires mounted in the spring. I had the wheels off so it only cost me $15.00 per tire to have them mounted and balanced. The place quoted me $45.00 per tire if I rode the bike in and they took them off. That's what I will do next time. As for balancing them yourself, there is a liquid balancer/sealer that you can put in the tires when you mount them. I can't remember the name (Green Goop maybe?) but I'm sure someone will be along with that info soon. You could probably do a search for tire balancing or tire sealant and find the info.
$50 is standard in Omaha, off the bike. That's why alot of guys are going with the Harbor Frieght set up. If on sell it cost less than $100 and you get more quality time with your bike.
 

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I use an old 14" auto rim with a piece of heater hose on the edge to protect the rim. To break the bead I use a 2" x 4" x 8' with a piece about 3" long cut off the end and attached to the 2" x 4" about 2 feet from the end. I strap the wheel on with some packing straps put it in front of the car and use the stub piece on the 2" x 4" to pry the bead off with the end of the 2" x 4" under the car's bumper. I too put the wheel on the axle and set it on car stands to balance it.

YOU REALLY OUGHT TO HAVE SOME RIMS PROTECTORS AND A 15" OR LONGER TIRE IRON. I heard people use PVC pipe for rim protectors.
 

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I just changed the tires on my 1100 recently with my father's help. We used a couple of 4x4 chunks to hold the rims up off the ground to protect the rotors and some 2/4s with a really large c-clamp to break the beads down. Then with the help of some jumbo screwdrives to hold the tire edges up and some small flat bar nail pullers we changed the tires. It was much easier than changing a regular car time using the manual method. The only reason we did it ourselves was to only local shop wanted $30 dollars a tire to change time to the new ones I had purchased and when my father went to drop the rims and new tires off, the man said he didn't mount tires he didn't sell after all. Made dad made and he decided we could do it ourselves just as good as he could.

I really thought it wasn't too bad of a deal. With the harbor freight changer I think it would be a breeze. We didn't balance them, but the seem to be running pretty smooth as is.
 

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I used a bench vise to break the bead on the old tire, a piece of 3/4" x 4" on each side of the tire where it met the vise jaws. I have broken the bead on tires by jacking up my car, placing the bike wheel under the car tire with a piece of wood on the bike tire and easing the car down on the tire with the jack. A little prying on the tire with an iron while the car is pressing down on it usually breaks it loose nicely. Just be careful not to set the car down on the rim itself.

I remove the brake disks while working on the tires. Laying the wheel on my work table, it wasn't too hard to work the old E2 off with a couple tire irons made out of 1" x 1/8" steel strap, shaped with a grinder. I wrap the irons with friction tape to protect the rims. Balancing the wheels was easy, support the axle on each side, make sure the wheel is vertical and give it a slight spin. A slight spin or you'll be waiting a long time for the wheel to stop. I mark the upper side the the tire with tape or chalk and spin it again. After three or four tries you'll see whether the wheel is balanced and the chalk marks are randomly spaced around the wheel or they will tend to group together in one area. Stick on an adhesive tire weight in the center of the group of chalk marks and spin the wheel. eventually the chalk marks will be scattered randomlyaround the wheel indicating it's correctly balanced. You don't need fancy machines. I've had my bikes over 100mph on tires I balanced this way and they ran smoothly.
 

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Come to Toronto I'll set you up with a guy for 12.00 a rim off the bike. However at 25.00 a rim off the the bike it's still a good price. You would have to do a lot of tires to justify having your own stuff.

Cheers Jim
 

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I use a vice to break the bead then a couple cheap tire irons. Dunlop tires have balance marks on them, should be a small yellow circle on the side wall, line the mark up with the valve and it should be balanced. Don't ask me how it works, I learned this at a local shop, he's got a balancer but doesn't use it.

jeff

:11black:
 

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Dunlop puts the dot on the lightest point of the tire to allow for the weight of the tire valve. It still should be balanced but most likely will be pretty close.
 

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PJ ONE BALANCE PLUS is a decent balance/sealer. Can find it most places around here and on line. 12 oz bottle for rear tire, 8 oz bottle for front.

I just use a largebench vise to break the beads.
 
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