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Hey all,

Have been riding to and from work on my 83 Aspy for a bit and it's running great! Wooohooo! beautiful weather too here in the desert. EXCEPT...today I went to leave work....have no idea why I looked at my rear wheel, but I was glad I did as I noticed a large nail head protruding from the tire. Turned out to be a 3inch long nail buried to the hilt...Agghh!

Since it was not in the center but closer to the edge of the right sidewall and apparently I had been riding on it for a bit as it was partially grinded, I limped her home the 15 miles and made it safe and sound. My question is, am I looking at buying a brand new tire? Is it a general rule on a bike this heavy to not patch or repair a tire? or an absolute NO WAY situation? This one is near new and has about 5/16 tread depth on it. my main concern is...is it SAFELY professionally fixable? Sucks cause I can't really afford a set of tires right now, so it looks like I'll be out of commision for a bit, but I don't definitely don't wanna eat pavement over a couple hundred bucks. Not worth it.

If I have to, I decided if I am buying a new rear, then I'm buying a new front too, as I think I'd be more comfortable with new rubber all the way around. Any suggestions on tires? Read some of the posts on Dunlops/Bridgestones..etc., but not sure what to get. Right now I have a 491 in the rear and a k177f in the front.

Thanks,

LarryG
 

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Got a break at work so I'll bite on this one. I've ridden several thousand miles on patched/plugged tires over the years. But I still think the decision is going to be yours. A lot of folks will tell you never to plug a tire, always use a patch. Especially on a tubeless tire. Others will say never do either, so long as you have the tire off, you might as well replace it. My biggest problem is finding a repairman in my area willing to fix a motor-cycle tire.

Not much help was I. If you do decide to buy new. Elite II's should work well in your climate if the sizes are available. It's early, hang around or check back, you're bound to get some more replies.... :gunhead:
 

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Since you are not going to ride until you make a decision, you may want to have the tire dismounted and have them look closely at the puncture inside to see if it did much damage as it wallowed around in the hole. If it is too close to the sidewall, the patch will not seal properly because it would have toseal the hole and stick to the sidewall. I just don't think it would be wise. As for the plug vs patch, keep in mind that with a plug, they will run a reamer into the hole with the plug attached and then trim off the excess. That tool makes the hole bigger and it definitely messes with the tire cords. I would never use a plug, unless I was on the side of the road without any other options. Even then, I would find someone to dismount the tire, remove the plug and and patch it ASAP. I usually keep a bottle of Slime for such an emergency. It temporarily fills in the hole from the inside. After you put it into the tire you want to ride slowly at first to allow the stuff to even out inside. Since I have not had to use it yet, I am not sure how difficult it would be to remove so a patch could be installed.That's just my 2 cents. Shooter is right, though. It is your call. Good luck!
 

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I just finished going thru the very same thing, except my nail was a screw, and it was at almost dead center. I removed the wheel and took it to a good bike shop where the tire was removed and inspected and deemed ok to have the patch put in.

Cost me a total of $28 Cdn. I feel quite secure with the patch as I saw the inside of the tire and there was no cord damage. Near the sidewall may be a different matter. I would take the same route and if they cannot patch, then you are still saving by doing some of the work yourself
 

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If the nail is not to far to the side it could probably be patched ok depending on the damage to the tire, I am riding on a patched rear tire, it had a small nail one tread off the center, I have had no problems after 4000 miles, I did add Ride On a couple of weeks ago to both tires.

http://www.ride-on.com/
 

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There are a lot of places that will not patch a motorcycle tire of any kind, it is a legitimate concern as far as liability.
 

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ElvisTorino wrote:
My shop won't patch a tubed tire, at all. We're concerned with the liability of it.
The "Patch" will out last the tire ! (only in Rear Tire)

Use "Ride On", it works!:clapper:
 

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LarryG wrote:
Hey all,

If I have to, I decided if I am buying a new rear, then I'm buying a new front too, as I think I'd be more comfortable with new rubber all the way around. Any suggestions on tires? Read some of the posts on Dunlops/Bridgestones, etc., but not sure what to get. Right now I have a 491 in the rear and a k177f in the front.
Thanks,
LarryG
Speaking for myself, I'd patch it with a plug and use it. The best patch would be an inside patch but I've never had a plug fail. Just recently plugged my brothers BMW 1100 on a trip with no problem. If a plug does fail it's not going to be a violent blow out and another plus is that it's on the rear tire which isn't as exciting to lose at the front. You're going to hear strong feelings both for replacing and patching on this forum, so you're kinda on your own. One possibility would be to replace the rear tire soon and replace the front with the same brand later on when it's more affordable. As for what brand, that's definitely a can of worms, all of us have our preferences, from REDWING who's almost rabid about Bridgestones to adherents of Dunlop EIIIs, Metzlers, etc. etc. I don't think you can go very farwrong with any brandbut that's just my opinion.
 

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I am not going to patch or plug except to get me to a new tire or tube. I could never feel good about going into that next curve worried about the tire holding air. The flat I had last year almost put us in the ditch. It is hard to describe the helpless feeling going thru that curveand have the rear end sliding out and feel you are going down almost for certain. This experience changed my mind about tire repair. I have had two flats in the last 40 years including trail riding. It may be 40 years before my next flat!!!!! :cheeky1: :jumper::cheeky1: :jumper: :cheeky1: :jumper: :cheeky1: :jumper: :cheeky1:
 

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Hey Larry,

I use a tire repair kit from Bell sold at wal-mart, had to use it only once and it worked well. But I only used to get me toa shop and buy a new tire. I just dont feel comfortable riding a 700+ pound bike with a plug or patch. Years ago on my 1100 I went down on the 101 in Los Angeles due to a patch failure........never again.
 

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I know that was not a good day for sure!! I had a flat on a car back in thesixties and they put 6 plugs in the hole to stop it from leaking. It worked and I wore that tire out with the plugsin it. You never know!! :goofygrin: :goofygrin:
 

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firefighter61 wrote:
Hey Larry,

I use a tire repair kit from Bell sold at wal-mart, had to use it only once and it worked well. But I only used to get me toa shop and buy a new tire. I just dont feel comfortable riding a 700+ pound bike with a plug or patch. Years ago on my 1100 I went down on the 101 in Los Angeles due to a patch failure........never again.
That's when they used "Model Glue" !:baffled::goofygrin:
 

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LarryG wrote:
Hey all,

Have been riding to and from work on my 83 Aspy for a bit and it's running great! Wooohooo! beautiful weather too here in the desert. EXCEPT...today I went to leave work....have no idea why I looked at my rear wheel, but I was glad I did as I noticed a large nail head protruding from the tire. Turned out to be a 3inch long nail buried to the hilt...Agghh!

Since it was not in the center but closer to the edge of the right sidewall and apparently I had been riding on it for a bit as it was partially grinded, I limped her home the 15 miles and made it safe and sound. My question is, am I looking at buying a brand new tire? Is it a general rule on a bike this heavy to not patch or repair a tire? or an absolute NO WAY situation? This one is near new and has about 5/16 tread depth on it. my main concern is...is it SAFELY professionally fixable? Sucks cause I can't really afford a set of tires right now, so it looks like I'll be out of commision for a bit, but I don't definitely don't wanna eat pavement over a couple hundred bucks. Not worth it.

If I have to, I decided if I am buying a new rear, then I'm buying a new front too, as I think I'd be more comfortable with new rubber all the way around. Any suggestions on tires? Read some of the posts on Dunlops/Bridgestones..etc., but not sure what to get. Right now I have a 491 in the rear and a k177f in the front.
Larry, personally I don't repair a tire & ride on it for long. Not that they can't be repaired but in most cases repairing a motorcycle tire lowers it's top speed rating to 75 MPH or less & I regularly travel at much above that.

Secondly, to properly repair a tubeless motorcycle tire it should be removed from the rim. If I am going to to go to all the trouble (& expense) of removing the tire from the rim I am going to replace it with a new one.

Twisty

Beloware 2 separate tire repair guide lines posted on the Dunlop tire web pages...

_________________________________________________________





Dunlop recommends only permanent repairs performed from the inside of the tire, using a combination patch/plug method. Never attempt a repair from the outside, or inject a sealant, or simply use an innertube, a patch or a plug as a substitute for a proper repair.

Only a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle tire dealer should perform repairs. Inspection of the tire and adequacy of repair becomes the responsibility of the person actually performing the repair and Dunlop does not warrant the results of a repair in any way. Combination patch/plug repair kits for use by the repair shop or dealer are available with accompanying instructions from companies such as:
Remarco Inc.
200 Paris Ave.
Northvale, NJ 07647
(201) 768-8100

Technical Rubber Co.
P.O. Box 486
Johnstown, OH 43031
(740) 967-9015

Tip-Top/Moto Combi Kit

Tech Uni-Seal® Repair Kit (Also has been marketed by Honda, Kawasaki, and Yamaha with their own part numbers.)​
NOTE: There may be suitable repair kits and materials provided by manufacturers other than those listed above.

Before any repair should be attempted, however, a tire must be removed from the wheel and thoroughly inspected. The following are minimum guidelines for the repairer:

Tires should not be repaired if any of the following conditions exist:
  1. A tire has been previously injected with a sealant/balancer.
  2. The puncture is larger than 6mm (1/4") in diameter.
  3. The puncture is not perpendicular to the carcass.
  4. The puncture is in the tire sidewall.
  5. Separation of plies, tread separation, separation of any other components.
  6. Cut or broken ply cords.
  7. Broken or damaged bead wires.
  8. Cut or damaged chafers (bead area).
  9. Deterioration of the carcass inside the tire due to "run flat" or underinflation.
  10. Cracks or other damage to the integrity of the inner liner.
  11. Excessive wear - tire should have at least 1/32 of an inch of tread depth, excluding tread wear indicators.
  12. Cracks in sidewall or tread.
  13. Impact breaks, cuts, snags or gouges that penetrate the surface.
NOTE:
  1. There should be no more than one repair in any quarter of the tire and no more than two repairs per tire.
  2. The wheel itself must be in good condition. Any cracked or bent wheel, however slightly, may allow the loss of air and cause subsequent deflation of the tire.
  3. Following repair, the valve assembly should be replaced and the tire/wheel rebalanced.
  4. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after tire repair and the repaired tire should never be used at speeds over 80 mph. The repairer is solely responsible for instructing the motorcyclist as to the restrictions to be placed on tire use following repair.
In summary, NO form of temporary repair should be attempted. Motorcycle tire repairs leave no room for error and any doubt as to inspection or adequacy of repair should be resolved by discarding the tire.

Be sure to consult our Motorcycle Tire Limited Warranty, Care and Maintenance brochure for additional information regarding the use of Dunlop tires. Seek a qualified motorcycle tire repair center for more details. NEVER ATTEMPT TO REPAIR A DAMAGED TIRE WITHOUT THE AIDE OF AN EXPERIENCED TIRE MECHANIC.
*******************************************************************








Some punctures in motorcycle tires may be repaired.

Dunlop recommends only permanent plug-patch repairs of small (maximum 1/4-inch diameter) tread area punctures from within the dismounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an inner tube as a substitute for a proper repair. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after repair and the repaired tire should never be used over 75 mph. Check inflation pressure after tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in, or sooner if air loss is suspected.

No form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by a penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair, and they may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by a penetrating object. Reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.
 

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Most of us have had puntures plugged at some stage. I've had plugs in tyres for years without problems. If however the puncture is at the side near the sidewall, I'd think twice. Even a patch won't do on sidewall punctures. I think an opinion from a tyre repair shop is the best bet here, as we can't actually see it ourselves.
 
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