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For a car need to fix slow leak inside sidewall has cut-can't see it but it leaks air. What's the preference?
 

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Any cut in a sidewall, replace the tire. There is no way to properly fix a sidewall in any tire, and besides, it is a severe safety hazard to ride on one no matter what kind of repair, temporary or perament is attempted.:shock:

Gene:action:
 

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I know your wanting to fix a auto tire . Just thought I would share a photo . I recently bought a spare front rim for the 1500 . Heres what I found when I removed the tire . the results of some sort of tire fixer upper .
 

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Never have been a fan of fix a flat. I have seen the the damage it does to a rim. However the cut it is minimal at best and I have seen it both from the outside and inside of the tire. Just spent $400 on 2 new front tires and another $400 aint gonna happen just now-daughter need braces.

I was more looking for insight into tire slyme, whether it was a better product. If I have to buy a used rim in the future then so be it.

Anyone have experience with the slime?
 

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wingsam41 wrote:
Never have been a fan of fix a flat. I have seen the the damage it does to a rim. However the cut it is minimal at best and I have seen it both from the outside and inside of the tire. Just spent $400 on 2 new front tires and another $400 aint gonna happen just now-daughter need braces.

I was more looking for insight into tire slyme, whether it was a better product. If I have to buy a used rim in the future then so be it.

Anyone have experience with the slime?
The slime is o.k. but it WILL ruin the rim. Good luck.
 

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Not likely either of them is going to fix a leak in a sidewall.
 

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Slime does what it says it does. I used it on my old cracked lawn tractor tires. Sealed them rite up, but all agree, it's bad on rims.
Jim
 

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wingsam41 wrote:
For a car need to fix slow leak inside sidewall has cut-can't see it but it leaks air. What's the preference?
If the price of a tire is out how about a tube????? It may work but I don't know on a wing. You could patch the inside to keep it from pinching the tube. ???????
 

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Well again havent actually decided to use the slime just wondering if I was missing out on something. Wouldnt even consider such a repair on a tire for a wing - this is for my Ford Explorer. I would actually like to patch it from the inside over anything else but tire shops can't do it because of liability which I don't blame em. I just have a hard time pitching a tire that is otherwise in great shape. I have had sidewall cuts that made me nervous but believe me this one doesn't. Again just happen to see it on the shelf next to fix a flat while looking for patches.
FYI I think it's a great idea to carry both patches and plug kits for your bike tires especially on trips. If u get a hole in the middle of nowhere you can do a roadside repair. Later if you find a shop to do a patch they may not have it onhand. Seems to me anytime I have ever needed a repair while on a roadtrip it's 5 minutes after the shop has technically "closed".
 

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The label on slime specifically states that it is not for repair other than in the tread area. Personally I won't use either of them.
 

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Search Ride-on. It states it won't damage the rim. Its not a fix a flat after the fact but a sealer/ballancer you put in a new or later. I've had it in the last 2 sets of tires in the past year and no damage to the rim when they were changed in August before I left on this x-country trip I'm on. I only had it in for 10,000 miles/9 months on the first set before the e3s were down close to wear bars, so I don't know from experience longer times. It was still simi fluid, slimy at that point and washed off but I know that I didn't loose air pressure as normally happened prior to using it as I checked it every 1-2 weeks.
It might work for your leak if you put it in and spin the tire on the side of the leak so it gets in the hole. Normally it stays on the contact area of the tread.
 

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as posted with the picture of the rim boogered up just imagine a aluminum rim on a semi truck in that condition i dont use fix a flat or slime on any of my cars now my riding lawn mower heck thats all the tire is full of dammed pine needles lol

a side wall puncture is bad replace the tire its shot, now if you have a hole on the tread area a simple 15 dollar plug kit and a small 15dollar air compressor will fix that and thats how i fix all my tires a .30 cent tire plug vs a bill to remove the tire, dismount clean, patch and gettin cussed out by the tech.


cuz i know if i had to scrape the goo outta the tire i'd just simply say you need a new tire.


good used tire salvage yard 15 dollars
 

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newday777 wrote:
Search Ride-on. It states it won't damage the rim. Its not a fix a flat after the fact but a sealer/ballancer you put in a new or later. I've had it in the last 2 sets of tires in the past year and no damage to the rim when they were changed in August before I left on this x-country trip I'm on. I only had it in for 10,000 miles/9 months on the first set before the e3s were down close to wear bars, so I don't know from experience longer times. It was still simi fluid, slimy at that point and washed off but I know that I didn't loose air pressure as normally happened prior to using it as I checked it every 1-2 weeks.
It might work for your leak if you put it in and spin the tire on the side of the leak so it gets in the hole. Normally it stays on the contact area of the tread.
Thanks Newday-that is the kind of response I was looking for, was wondering if there are rim-safe products avail that have improved on the fix-a-flat concept. Again just looking for options. I am not in a rush as I only have to add air every few days. Perhaps I should have titled my post differently as I mostly wanted to know more info about Tire Slimesince I have never seen it's affect on rimsand didn't know if it was an improvement over fix a flat.

Peterbuilt, I don't buy into what you are selling. I have a matched set of Bridgestone tires on this car with essentially a pin-prick through the sidewall of one tire.What makes you think a junkyard tire is a better or safer bet then what I have? You could spend $15 (which by the way good luck finding a good quality used tire at a junkyard for $15) not to mention a lot of wasted time. Time that could be better spent earning money to save for tires, braces etc. AnywayI could do that only to findI have more issues with the junkyard tire than with my current tire.

Also, the day I let someone getting paid to work on my car "cuss me out" ain't gonna happen either. Someone ever tries that and they are gonna get alesson in what "getting cussed out" means.

I've changed manytires as a young man in a few cardealerships and have dealt with fix a flat many times. So it's messy-big deal. Put on some headphones, take your time and clean out the crap or sell em a new rimthen hand them a bill. Either way if you are getting paid stop complaining or get a different job.
 

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If your determined to run it, patch it, and install a radial tube. The tire slime stuff just won't work on a sidewall, since centrifical force keeps it in the tread area. I definatelywould not run high speeds on that tire until I replaced it. The safety of my family is far more important than saving money on a tire. And Ford Explorers and Expeditions are known for their poor handling with a blow out. Too many have flipped, and the owners are fond of sueing over it. That's why no legitiment tire place will repair a sidewall.:shock:

Gene:action:
 

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Gene, thanks for your concern but I do feel a bit insulted that you would suggest I would compromise the safety of my family v saving a few bucks. I drive this vehicle - not my wife and kids and I feel more than confident that the issue with this tire will not result in a blowout. A cut in the sidewall is not even an accurate description of what has happened-it's actually a pin hole and yes I have seen it inside and out. I have decided not to use the slime anyway as it seems no better than fix a flat. In hindsight I should have omitted that part of the post (regarding the sidewall etc.) and just asked whether slime was any better (less damaging) for rims than fix a flat. Either way I too am doubtful that either would have the desired effect on the sidewall and then I'd be cleaning or pitching the rim for no reason.
One question unrelated-Who owns the Loud pipies quote in your signature?
 

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wingsam41 wrote:
One question unrelated-Who owns the Loud pipies quote in your signature?
That was my idea. Loud pipes are annoying to me, and almost everybody else, and besides, sound is directional, so unless the pipes are pointing forward, nobody in a cage is going to hear you until your going past them.:smiler:

Gene:action:
 

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GLester wrote:
wingsam41 wrote:
One question unrelated-Who owns the Loud pipies quote in your signature?
That was my idea. Loud pipes are annoying to me, and almost everybody else, and besides, sound is directional, so unless the pipes are pointing forward, nobody in a cage is going to hear you until your going past them.:smiler:

Gene:action:
I've used that quote on my Harley Buddies many times. I also like to ask how they can tell when their bikes are running-they don't get it.
 

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i've use the (green) tire slime to seal a rim leak & i know other guys that put it in tires with pin hole sidewall leaks & is does the job quite well even though the bottle says it will not work.

i would try it a bottle of tire slime (green stuff) only costs a couple buck & is says it washes out with water when you pull the tire. if you try it you need to spin the tire (drive acouple miles) to distribute the slime. i would then check the presure every couple of days untill you know that it dedinatly sealed the hole & not just slowed down the leak.
 

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I spent twenty years in the mechanics business. Never fixed a sidewall. Only replaced the tire. Not worth the liability.:thumbsdown:
 

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Everyone is concerned about liability these days, and that is a legitimate concern, because our society has become lawsuit happy.

But even though no one will fix a sidewall, it can be done if you can find someone willing.

I've read tech bulletins from tire manufacturers outlining how to fix a sidewall.

In addition, I've seen plugs in sidewalls.Back when I used to work in the auto repair business, there was acompany I used to get supplies from, called Tech,they supply patches and plugs and other tire supplies.Theirliterature had ads that showed tires witha hundred or more plugs in the sidewall of one tire, and it still ran fine. So one day when the Tech guy was there, I asked him about it. He took me out to his truck and showed me hisfront tire. Hehad 30 or 40 plugs in it. He then got out his plugging tool and loaded a plug into it, covered it in glue, found a "clean spot"in the sidewall and pushed anotherplug into it, making anotherhole and leaving the plug in it. He said that everytime someone asked, he put another plug into the sidewall.

But he did point outthat Tech wasn't just using the cheap rope and gooplugs. Theywere rubber, with a coating thatwhen combined with the glue caused the rubber to vulcanize. He said that all their patches and all their plugs were made this way.

After that I fixed about a dozen sidewalls, until my boss discovered I was doingso and told me to stop doing it. We didn't use plugs where I worked, because the company considered them a liablity too. But since the patches were were made of the same materials, and used the same glue I was comfortable using them. We used the patches that had a stem in the middle, so it was a combination of a plug and a patch anyway.

I told ever customer when I did it, that it "wasn't recommended" and I couldn't promise that it wouldn't come loose and leak air. But I was willing to try if they were. I alsotold every one of them if it started leaking to come back and see me and I would give them a refund. Not one ever came back.

So my thought is that if it were me, if I could find a shop that was willing to patch your sidewall, I would try that. But the sad truth is that you probably won't find one.

From Tech's website:

http://www.techtirerepairs.com/why.htm

Can sidewall or shoulder injuries be repaired?


Tech's policy is most crown, shoulder and sidewall injuries can be repaired, depending on:

  • The location of the injury
  • The size of the injury
  • Type of tire and speed rating of the tire
However, Tech advocates that the tire manufacturer's published tire repair policy for the brand of tire being repaired be strictly followed and adhered to when repairing that particular brand of tire.

I found Tech's catalog online, and they still advertise their Permacure plug repairs. The have a picture of a white wall passenger tire with 950 of their plugs in it. The caption states that the drove the tire 80,000 miles at 50 mph and not one of the permacure plugs failed.

http://tinyurl.com/techcatlog
Then go to page 16 of the catalog.

If it were me, I would try to contact TECH and ask them if they could recommend a tire dealer in your area that might do the repair.

Tel: 740-967-9015 or 1-800-433-TECH. This is their headquarters in OH.

Remember, they are not a retail dealer. So you may be able to get the names of some dealers in your area. Possibly their local territory salesman and they can refer you to some dealers. But keep in mind that most dealers, will still refuse to fix a sidewall, even though the product is designed for it. Hopefully the territory salesman will know of someone. All you need is one.
 
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