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Recently I acquired 81 GL 1100 interstate in rough shape. I am trying to get it back on road.Since tires are rotted and running flat quickly I would like to change them for bigger than stock. Does any one know what will fit. Preferably front tireto appearsclose to rear tire.

Currently on the bike front 110/90-19 DunlopGold SealF11

Rear130/90-17 Dunlop K627
 

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Hi...WELCOME to the Forum. I think you'll find thatenlarging the front will affect the speedometer accuracy (its possible that it could improve accuracy, too, but not likely), and there isn't a lot of room inside the swingarm for a bigger rear; many report tire rubbing.

There are better, more informed answers, but you'll have to wait 'till the GURUS see your thread. :waving:
 

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I totally recommend staying with the stock sizes. It is likely that bigger tires will have an adverse effect on handling. Honda engineers chose the stock sizes for a reason. Newer bikes have bigger tires (usually) but they also have completely different steering, frame, and suspension geometry.
 

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Ido not necessarily care for speedometer, I am planning to use GPS for that purpose. Most people I talk to say "stay with stock sizes". I newer rode goldwing yet so handling is a mystery for me. Thanks for all responses.
 

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Many people think all kinds of things are "upgrades", but most of them are downgrades. Going with bigger tires is one of them, going with an aftermarket exhaust is another, switching to a "performance" air filter, like K&N, is one of the worst. First, it flows more air, which on a stock engine does absolutely nothing except lean out the air/fuel mixture, which is probably already to lean, and if it flows more air, it also flows more dirt, shortening the life of your engine. Anything that causes an otherwise stock engine to make more power is a major downgrade, as it drastically shortens the life of the engine.

Unless you know exactly what you are doing, what you want, and what the trade off will be, stock is always the way to go. If you are building a bike for racing, then you obviously know you will be rebuilding the engine a lot. But that doesn't work well on the street.

Stay with the stock sizes, tires have improved considerably over the last few decades since that bike was built.
 
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