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10. "Is it Halloween or are those your real teeth?"




9. "Do you know the queen?"





8. "What language are you speaking? I don't understand you"





7. "Do you eat anything that doesn't come in pie form?"





6. "Seriously, are those your real teeth?"






5. "When are you coming to collect Posh and Becks?"






4. "Are you speaking English, because I've got no idea what you're saying"






3. "What do you mean let's go and smoke a ***?"






2. "Okay, say that one more time, but this time in American"





1. "Do you know what, England should do its own version of 'The Office'"



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Gene that list was funny can you print it in English for us:cheeky1::waving:
 

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Reminds me of the story about the American who wrote for information about the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. They asked if they would be able to speak english up there. The reply was "Yes, but you will have to learn it first":cooldevil:
 

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rcmatt007 wrote:
I just want to get "knocked up" in the morning:cool::jumper:
:)Going back a few years,,about the time of Queen Vic,, there was a job of knocker up,where a man in a neighbourhood, would know the times, that people needed to get up for work, and go around knocking on the bedroom windows of folk with a long pole for a few pennies
 

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pinkpork wrote:
rcmatt007 wrote:
I just want to get "knocked up" in the morning:cool::jumper:
:)Going back a few years,,about the time of Queen Vic,, there was a job of knocker up,where a man in a neighbourhood, would know the times, that people needed to get up for work, and go around knocking on the bedroom windows of folk with a long pole for a few pennies
And once in a while he woke pretty maidens by an alternative method, hence 'getting knocked up'.
 

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I've always enjoyed seeing/hearing the differences in our two forms of English. Most things make sense once explained. (not all, but most).

It was on this forum that I first heard the term "earth" when referring to the negative side of the electrical system. Having always called it ground, it took me only a moment to realize what was meant, and it makes perfect sense, but I had never heard it before.

No one has explained to me yet why you guys call a trunk a boot. Is there a logical reason for that one? ;)
 

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Wolfman you'd understand if they spoke American.......
 

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Wolfman wrote:
No one has explained to me yet why you guys call a trunk a boot. Is there a logical reason for that one? ;)
I would have thought this one was plainly obvious Wolfman........ we Brits thought that the space at the back of the car was better suited to storing boots than elephants!!!!!:baffled::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:

Actually, it stems back way fruther than a car, I suspect, probably back to when the horse and carriage of the gentry carried a footman or bootman on the back, sometimes seen standing on the plate atthe rear. I would guess you guys call it a trunk, because that is where the travelling case, ( or trunk) was carried. ( I would hazard a guess you weren't in the habit of carrying an elephant's nose around with you for any particular purpose. :baffled::D)
 

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GLester wrote:
9. "Do you know the queen?"

7. "Do you eat anything that doesn't come in pie form?"


5. "When are you coming to collect Posh and Becks?"



3. "What do you mean let's go and smoke a ***?"

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9) of course we do, we have all met her at parties. :shock::cheeky1:

7) Are you suggesting there are other ways to eat stuff. :baffled::stumped::cheeky1:

5) you are kiddin' right?????? No point in us having them here, we don't understand 'em. :action::shock::baffled::stumped:

3) Yes let's. :):)We can have one of those BackWoods, Honey Berry, cigars that you introduced Helen and me to. :clapper::clapper:
 

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Now Foxy, you know that on non-pie days it is always stuffed in used pig guts.

And when we have tea with the Queen we get salmon and cucumber sandwiches.
 

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Silverfox wrote:
Wolfman wrote:
No one has explained to me yet why you guys call a trunk a boot. Is there a logical reason for that one? ;)
I would have thought this one was plainly obvious Wolfman........ we Brits thought that the space at the back of the car was better suited to storing boots than elephants!!!!!:baffled::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:

Actually, it stems back way fruther than a car, I suspect, probably back to when the horse and carriage of the gentry carried a footman or bootman on the back, sometimes seen standing on the plate atthe rear. I would guess you guys call it a trunk, because that is where the travelling case, ( or trunk) was carried. ( I would hazard a guess you weren't in the habit of carrying an elephant's nose around with you for any particular purpose. :baffled::D)
See? So far they all make sense. Some of them just need to be explained.



:cool:
 

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When you consider the actual meaning of the two words you can reasonably equate the two words. A bonnet is a protective covering for the head and a hood usually goes over the head to protect it from the weather...
 

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"Y'all" just seems so insignificant now......:(

:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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"Two people seperated by a common language.":cheeky1:

While Pete and Helen were here, I learned what we call the "idle speed" in England is the "tick over rate".

We also talked about the word "pissed".

Here, it means angry and in England it means drunk!!:gunhead:
 

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It's an issue here, as well.
You should have seen the look on my brother's Californian girlfriend's face when I related a story and used the term "busting my friend's balls"...which has a COMPLETELY different meaning in her part of the left coast.

Had to do some quick explaining!!!
 
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