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:DNeed a Torque Wrench but not sure what one to get as Ihave been told what settings are needed start FROM up to:blushing::blushing:anyone any ideas on this:).

Also anyone any views on the gunk one can put into a tyre to stop Punctures, justtook a tyre to a garage because the valve has had it, but had Gold seal in the tyre they say that they can't repair due to it and that gunk ruins the tyre.



The tyre is nearly brand new so not very happy:gunhead:anyone else use some sort of tyre Puncture gunk?:(
 

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The Irish Crew
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Any torque wrench will cover all you need on a motorcycle. I have one of the Tengs and it is more than I will ever need.

Tyre seal doesnt ruin tyres, the fitter is probably just too lazy to clean it all out and wants to sell you a new tyre. Some cheap tyre seal can oxidize the aluminum wheel but it won't harm the tyre.
 

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You'll have to bear with me I'm on the other side of the pond. When you need a torque wrench it should be one where the setting you want is in the top 80%. Let's say a wrench goes to 100 ft/lb. Since they are only accurate in the top 80% the only bolts you should use it on call for 20 - 100 ft/lb. Over here they sell them with 1/4" drives that will do about 2 to 20 ft/lb. The bolts with 8mm and 10mm heads will usually be tightened with this wrench. The bolts with larger heads will usually take 20 or more ft/lb. The wrenches with a 3/8" drive can normally do these.



I have a 3/8" wrench made by Snap-On, a company thats makes very good tools. It was quite expensive. I don't remember what I paid for it over 25 years ago. Its top setting is 75 ft/lb which means you shouldn't do anything under 15 ft/lb. I've used it for stuff as low as 5 ft/lb and never had it break a boltor strip threads. The parts installed have never leaked or fallen off. I have recently though bought a 1/4" from Harbor Freight, a low end quality tool dealer. It seems to work just as well and is easier to use as the click on the 3/8" wrench at low torques is light and easy to miss.



If you can afford both get a 1/4" and a 3/8". If you can't get both get the best 3/8" you can. Hopes this helps! LOL!
 

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fgh is pretty much right on target here. I run an accredited calibration lab that we also supply the automotive industry and heavy duty equipment. We certify all types of torque wrenches and it's also in the National Standard not to use the bottom 10 to 20%, depending on the type and statement of accuracy of the wrench. Not saying you can't use it in this range, just don't count on accuracy there. You probably won't ruin anything. I do use the smaller 1/4" drive torque wrench in the tight spots with low torque and my 1/2" drive elsewhere. It's better than not using one at all.
 

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:)Hi am using Draper torque wrenches 1/2" for wheels and such like;3/8"brakes etc.Well calibrated,they both work fine,got them off ebay for a very reasonable price.



When i was last having a tyre fitted i asked mechanic about puncture seal,he said it throws tyre out of balance when it thrashes about when wheels goin round.Dont know how true this is but i did,nt bother having it fitted.;)



Alan
 

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Applying a lubricant to the bolt you are torquing is necessary if you expect to get an accurate setting. The difference between lubricating and not is enormous.
 

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I use Craftsman tools and have3/8 & 1/2 inch torque wrenches. However they are old style bar & needle type. I really don't know how accurate they are but I've never had a problem, even with head bolts, which is probably the most critical surface I've used them on.
 

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JamesGang wrote:
Applying a lubricant to the bolt you are torquing is necessary if you expect to get an accurate setting. The difference between lubricating and not is enormous.
depends if it calls for wet or dry torque. i have 1/4 " at 30-200"lbs and 3/8 at 150-2000"lbs and also electronic same values and both snapon. beauty wiyh elect. is can be swapped between in. lbs, ft. lbs and newt meters with a button press not mandatory but very useful.
 

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The Honda manual calls for Moly Paste on the cleaned bolt threads and under the bolt heads. If you omit moly paste the clamping pressure on heads will be considerably reduced. There are other places on the bike that need to be torqued and most of them call for torquing dry. Check the manual for the proper specs. One thing to consider about a torque wrench is that the exact torque often isn't as critical as repeatability. If the torque is a little high or low that's less important than having all the bolts in a unit like the head or engine case set the same to avoid warping.
If you have to improvise you can use a wrench and a fish scale to set torque. Awkward but pretty accurate. Just measure the distance between the center of the bolt head to the point the scale hooks to the wrench and use that to calculate the correction in foot pounds. Be sure to pull the wrench with the fish scale at a right angle to the wrench. I've used this method in the bush when the right tools weren't available and managed to successfully change the head gasket on a small diesel generator.
 

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i have snap on 1/4 inch, inch pound torque wrench, a 3/8 matco torque wrench, a snap on 1/2" torque wrench, and a brand new 1/2" digital torque wrench that beeps and is programable, between these few i have its about 1,000dollars for all of them and they work good but rember to calibrate them at least once every 2 yrs if you use them alot each year is reccomended, especially for motor work, the good ones like snap on, mac, matco, ect.. work plus or minus 5% of the value of the torque so it will be with in 5% of the torque value, harbor freight ones are ok if you use them at home but rember you get what you pay for there
 

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Where do you find a fish scale in the bush? Is it a fish scale you use or a scale for weighing fish?



:D:cheeky1::action:
 
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