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I have a couple of Standard Wings. My wife and I haven't travelled much lately, so I am selling my GL1200I and solely riding the naked bikes. We do plan to do some long distance travelling occassionally though. I was wondering what you all use for a long-distance trip? I have looked at Large leather or Ameritex bags, I have looked at tour packs and even thought of a trailer. I just can't decide. I know I will miss the room of my Interstate luggage!

Thanks in advance
 

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Hi Davebave,

I use a trailer when I need more room, 40cubic foot of extra space that dosn't affect the handling at all. Then just un-hitch and youv'e got your bike back.
 

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I use the Nelson Rigg SB900 soft saddlebags. They're bigger than anything else I've seen, and pretty durable. They come with drybags that fit inside the saddlebags, and for $80 they're a steal.

Whatever I can't fit into the saddlebags goes into a river-running dry bag across the back of the bikeand/or my tankbag. The tent and sleeping pad also go across the back.

If you need more room than that, you're probably taking more stuff than you need.
 

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Johno,

That's exactly what I would like to do, but I absolutely have no more room to store trailers (1 for me and 1 for the wife maybe). In the future I may go that way, but for now, I guess a cheap set of Jumbo tourpacks would suffice. By the way, does the trailer decrease your mpg at all? Also, you said you don't even notice it. Is that true, i have never rode with one?

Thanks
 

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Hi again,

I supose it all depends on the weight your carrying in the trailer and the size of the trailer wether it affects handling/mpg

In the UK we're restricted by law to a trailer that extends no further than 2meters (6'6") from the rear axel with a width of 1m (3'3") and a laden wieght of 1/3rd of the towing motorcycle. (thats enough to carry 2 small tumble dryers!, (don't ask!!!))

This size gives no affect on handling at all, sometimes I even forget it's there, scares a few car drivers when overtaking!

As for consumption, do you loose mpg when carrying a pillion, the same applies to a small trailer probably 1/2-1mpg nothing noticable.

but as I said the main benefit is, when on a tour arrive at the venue lock all your gear in the trailer, unhitch, leave the trailer behind and away you go and enjoy the ride with no luggage holding you back.

And if you have a similar hitch on any other vehicle it becomes multi purpose.
 

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Johno, Thanks for the info. I was thinking MPG miht be decreased even more than saddle pacs because of the increased friction between the road and 2 additional wheels.

I really like the idea of just taking of the trailer and go riding free again. Both of my bikes are big enoug to handle a trailer no problem. I have looked into trailer hitches for the standards with no luck. I am sending another posting with that question to the Tech board. Do you have any ideas?
 

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My last bike was a basic 650 and I had the same problem so I bit the bullet and made my own hitch This lasted 11yrs 30,000 miles towing a trailer and outlasted the bike(89,000 on the bike)

The lowest arm should be able to bolt to the rear footpeg mounts, you'd probably have to use longer bolts so that the arms fit 'inside the frame then attach the arms with locking nuts on the protruding end of the bolt. These arms is where all the strength is to pull the trailer so the metal should be pretty strong. With some clever bending, should clear the suspension and rear wheel

To support the whole assembly two vertical arms spaced either side of the rear subframe and bolted as far forward on the subframe (upper suspension mounts are ideal) as possible.

Bolt or weld (Bolting allows easier removal of the rear wheel)a suitable piece of steel between all four arms to form a sort of pyramid.

Attach your chosen hitch to the steel plate and mount the electrical socket next to it.

With a bit of design work you can make it look like it's always been part of the bike and if your not going to use the trailer for any length of time, just undo the 4 mounts and remove the whole assembly ready for next time.

On my 1200I I have a GL1100 Markland hitch and mounts and isfitted similar to the above although I had to extend the mounting arms toReach the footpeg mounts by about 7"

here's to success
 

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Thanks Johno, I will save this advice for when/if I do make a hitch.
 
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