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Gentelmen, and ladies,



You can buy a product, "Tow Caddy",on the Internet that fits into yer trailerhitch receiver, that allows you to pick up the front tire of yer Wing then tow it around with just the back tire on the ground. ?? Wada ya think ?? If it's in neutural, does the tranny still have oil available as needed.I love my 84 Goldwing with 40K on it, would hate to mess things up. This Tow Caddy thing looks very easy to use and store, much easier than a utility trailer.



Would appreciate your thoughts.



jack in Vancouver WA
 

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I think the issue may be the shaft drive and not necessarily the tranny. I would be leery myself.
 

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I ahve recently considered this (and still may do it)

But, there are two isues with tow caddies..

(1) as you mention, the lubrication of the output shaft.. to me this is not a serious issue as there is no torque or forces on the shaft, but even if it was, overfilling the oil a little bit would solve the issue.. lifting the front may alreadybe enough.. and

(2) the rolling rear tire will scuff on the sides during all turns (or when the bike is not vertical) because the geometry of the front treecauses the bike to lean the OPPOSITE direction of the turn when turning..When not going straight (and the bike not mounted exactly vertical) it will wear the edges of the tires..

I would not recommend it for long tows.. but short distances it should be fine.
 

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They do make a version that is "hinged" so the bike always remains upright. I think something like this would be good for self recoveryor maybe a short trip to the shop but not sure I'd use the set-up for any long distance hauling.
 

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I see one more possible problem. If you hit a bump, the bike might accidentally get shifted into gear. I have towed rear wheel drive cars on all 4 wheels, after removing the drive shaft. I think the only kind of bike I would tow like that would be a chain drive bike, after removing the chain. All of this is of course just my opinion
 

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Even in Neutral, the transmission has several gears that are spinning, along with the output shaft, all of which are pressure lubed by the engine's oil pump. Under no condition should it be towed by the rear wheel more than a couple of hundred feet to prevent damage to the internal parts. Besides, that contraption puts and extreme amount of strain on the forks and the triple tree, that with a heavy bike like the wing, do you really want to have to repair or try to replace the forks and such? No way would I use this except on maybe a dirt bike with a chain I could unhook.:shock: A simple trailer can be had for a few hundred dollars, plus it can be used to haul other things too.:smiler:

Gene:action:
 

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GLester wrote:
Even in Neutral, the transmission has several gears that are spinning, along with the output shaft, all of which are pressure lubed by the engine's oil pump. Under no condition should it be towed by the rear wheel more than a couple of hundred feet to prevent damage to the internal parts. Besides, that contraption puts and extreme amount of strain on the forks and the triple tree, that with a heavy bike like the wing, do you really want to have to repair or try to replace the forks and such? No way would I use this except on maybe a dirt bike with a chain I could unhook.:shock: A simple trailer can be had for a few hundred dollars, plus it can be used to haul other things too.:smiler:

Gene:action:
Totally agree.
 

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for short distances it would be ok but long distances wont, those caddies were made thinking on chain driven bikes where you can easily remove the chain. on the wing you will have the whee turning the transmission. no way to stop this unless you remove the outputshaft lol
 

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I will take all the above advise and throw the idea down the crapper. THANK YOU ALL for the replys. Quite the "Think Tank" you guys are.
 

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GLester wrote:
Even in Neutral, the transmission has several gears that are spinning, along with the output shaft, all of which are pressure lubed by the engine's oil pump. Under no condition should it be towed by the rear wheel more than a couple of hundred feet to prevent damage to the internal parts. Besides, that contraption puts and extreme amount of strain on the forks and the triple tree, that with a heavy bike like the wing, do you really want to have to repair or try to replace the forks and such? No way would I use this except on maybe a dirt bike with a chain I could unhook.:shock: A simple trailer can be had for a few hundred dollars, plus it can be used to haul other things too.:smiler:

Gene:action:
Hey Gene.. agree trailer is better.. but it doesn't fit in my trunk.:smiler:some more questions for you... (1) why wouldn't overfilling solve the lubrication issues of the few moving parts by flooding/splash(since there is little/no load) and (2) I don't see the fork/TT forces you are talking about.. I built a little model (not full scale.. but that how I observed the opposite lean), butI'm not seeinghow there are any unusual or exaggerated forces.. seems like they would be about the same as riding it (unless I do something weird.. like tow through the mud or crash the tow carinto something)..
 

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Only work for our bikes if you remove the shaft (not a good solution) or have the engine running and it stays in neutral, otherwise it will burn up the tranny/clutch.
 

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sandiegobrass wrote:
Hey Gene.. agree trailer is better.. but it doesn't fit in my trunk.:smiler:some more questions for you... (1) why wouldn't overfilling solve the lubrication issues of the few moving parts by flooding/splash (since there is little/no load) and (2) I don't see the fork/TT forces you are talking about.. I built a little model (not full scale.. but that how I observed the opposite lean), butI'm not seeinghow there are any unusual or exaggerated forces.. seems like they would be about the same as riding it (unless I do something weird.. like tow through the mud or crash the tow carinto something)..
1. Overfilling might work, except for the primary output shaft that has a drilled pressure hole for one of the bearings that has to be pressurized to get lubed(as with most of the bearings), I guess if instead of 4 quarts you fill it until it is almost running out, it might be ok. But whata waste of money. On the front forks, remember they were designedextended forward because the forces of the rear wheels pushes against them, compressing them, not pulling out by the front wheel. By an engineering standpoint, the front wheel was never designed to be a pull point, it was designed to be pushed on, but not pulled on. If you look at the triple tree, the way the clamps are designed are for pushing forces, not pulling forces. (Lower connection to forks thick on backside of clamp, thinner on front sides of clamp) When you get down to it, the front forks on the Wings are barely adequate as they are, when you consider how often they go through seals and bushings compared to lighter bikes. Why force them into something that they truly were never designed to handle? But it's your choice, so if you want to do it, go for it, I'm not your daddy. Good luck.:smiler:

Gene:action:
 

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Benefit is not worth the risk. Not even to be considered.
 

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sure you can do it i wouldnt worry about the lube in the rear diffrential its got its own lube the main issue as stated above is premature tire wear but depending on how far you wanna go just put a new tire on before u go

my dad considered this but he was going to go about 2000 miles and tow the bike like this now on his fatboy about 5,000 miles and the rear tire is about shot

so you got a friend that can loan you a trailer??
 

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mr irrelevant
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Why do something like this when you can go to U haul and rent a trailer for $20 bucks?...Just not worth the risk...
 

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tmdriverwannabe wrote:
Why do something like this when you can go to U haul and rent a trailer for $20 bucks?...Just not worth the risk...
Darned inflation!! Last time I checked it was fifteen!

+1 onU-HAUL.
 

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A trailer is a really handy tool to have. I bought a HF trailer last winter and built it in my living room. Finished assembly outside. It has been very handy for a variety of things like moving grand kids to new homes and hauling car parts. I haven't had to put the Wing on it yet, knock on wood.


Lyle
 

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A Google search turns up a few different manufacturers. One states right out that the chain must be removed. Another says that you should consult the m/c manufacturer for shaft drive bikes.
 

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The manual for my 1500 says NOT to tow or serious powertrain damage will most likely result. jimsjinx
 

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GLester wrote:
On the front forks, remember they were designedextended forward because the forces of the rear wheels pushes against them, compressing them, not pulling out by the front wheel. By an engineering standpoint, the front wheel was never designed to be a pull point, it was designed to be pushed on, but not pulled on.
That particular detail should never become an issue.
The triple tree tie down straps would have the forks nearly all the way compressed. The frame would have the towing forces on it, not the forks.

as an emergency feature to get yourself home, I would do it if not too far from home. Say 50-75 miles???
And even on that short trip, I would have the tranny in neutral of course, and the engine idling.

But here, I see a much bigger problem IMO. Raise the front wheel enough so the car/truck's suspension does not bottom out the tow chock, and the front of the bike will be high enough that the rear fender will be dragging or very nearly so...

Planning a long trip? I would not even consider it.

I, like others, have pulled my dirt bikes thousands of miles w/o any noticeable wear on the rear tires. Tied down exactly as I described above. Straps on the triple tree for strength and security. Straps on the handlebars to prevent any tendency for wobbling or leaning of the fork/wheel assembly.

IMO, it is just not a good idea at all.
Trailers only for me.
 
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