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Does anyone have any experence towing a goldwing using the type of tow cradle that goes into the trailer hitch of your vech and the front wheel of the bike goes into the cradle. I am thinking about getting one but wanted to research it first.

Thanks
 

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I have NO experience with that type of towing. That being said, several years ago, before the Goldwing, I saw a cycle being towed that way. It was leaning to one side and appeared to be putting a lot of twist on the forks. As Sgt Schultz would say, "I know nothing". Hopefully someone with some personal experience or knowledge will be along in a few minutes.
 

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I have towed a bike that way for 1,000s of miles.

BUT!!! It was chain drive and I removed the chain. Plus, you always use tie down straps to the handlebars. Do NOT depend on the wheel to hold the bike upright. good way to break something.

I would highly suggest that if you pulled a Goldwing that way, you will most likely be doing tranny work in the near future.

No oil on moving parts. Not a good thing.
 

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My worry with a 'Wing would be the weight of the bike. Holding it upright by the front wheel would put some pretty great stress on the forks, steering stem and frame neck. The other concern I'd have would be the final drive shaft in the transmission. With the engine not running there's no oil pumped into the transmission which may cause accelerated wear.
 

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I've also seen bikes towed in the manner you suggest. I didn't like it at all. I wouldn't want my Wing towed like that for the reasons given - I thought it was extremely hard on the steering head.

You can get a trailer from Harbor-Freight for about $300, throw some plywood or treated lumber on it for the floor and then use that, which would be much more desirable. I bought a 5'x10' utility trailer with the fold-down tailgate - it not only serves to haul my Wing around, but is used to haul mulch, stone, make landfill runs, etc.
 

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AZgl1500 wrote:
I have towed a bike that way for 1,000s of miles.

BUT!!! It was chain drive and I removed the chain. Plus, you always use tie down straps to the handlebars. Do NOT depend on the wheel to hold the bike upright. good way to break something.

I would highly suggest that if you pulled a Goldwing that way, you will most likely be doing tranny work in the near future.

No oil on moving parts. Not a good thing.
I agree with above.

Common practise when towing any rear driveshaftvehicle is to remove the driveshaft or tow it from the rear so the rear end is up in the air. A goldwing fits this same definition and you will have some mechanical problems as a result of towing with rear wheel on the ground.
 

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If you took off the speedo cable at the wheel hub and tied the bars back, you could tow it backwards with the rear wheel in the cradle.
 

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exavid wrote:
My worry with a 'Wing would be the weight of the bike. Holding it upright by the front wheel would put some pretty great stress on the forks, steering stem and frame neck. The other concern I'd have would be the final drive shaft in the transmission. With the engine not running there's no oil pumped into the transmission which may cause accelerated wear.
That's OK, just leave it in gear, then the engine will turn along with the transmission, and it will pump oil! :)
 

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Better yet, start it up and set the cruise control and the bike can help push the tow vehicle.
 

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Exavid said what i was going to... some user manuals i've read specify if you gonna tow the bike like that, should not be for long distances. so the u-haul seems like a better and safer way to transport ur wing.
 

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Only one question, why tow a wing when you could be riding it....:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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papabee49 wrote:
Only one question, why tow a wing when you could be riding it....:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
When I moved from Tacoma, WA to Medford, OR I had no choice. I had to move three 'Wings, couldn't ride them all at once. Actually I moved my '93 on a U-haul trailer and found it to be excellent, one of the easiest vehicles I've ever loaded and unloaded a Goldwing on. Also lots of good tie down places on the trailer to secure the bike. That's how I'll move another bike if I can't ride it.
 

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papabee49 wrote:
Only one question, why tow a wing when you could be riding it....:cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
In my case, I had to put it on a trailer in order to get it where the carbs were being rebuilt. Sometimesit just ain't running to ride! :(
 

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I totally agree with the comments here. The only way to tow a Wing is ON a trailer.

:clapper:

I have a 4X8 trailer with drop down ramp. I use it for my 4X4 and that is what I used to pick up my 81 Wing when I bought it last year. It was running but I did not know enough about it at that point to trust it on a 4 hour ride.

:(

The 4X8 was little snug, a 10' trailer or one without the ramp would be better but the bike would be harder to load. With the ramp its a breeze.

:action:

Locally the trailer was less than $500 and I use it all the time for many things.

;)
 

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This seemed like a good thread to add my experience. I wanted to get this on the forum, for anyone doing a search.

I just bought a GW, and have never trailered a m/c before. The bike was 400 miles from home.

I already had a Harbor Freight 4'x8' flatbed trailer, with 3/4" plywood on top. This is a very useful trailer, at a decent price.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=90154

I drove down to Virginia with a stock of parts and hardware, because I wasn't quite sure how this would all go together.

To get the bike onto the trailer, I used this ramp (which can be found on sale for $60)
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=90018
(not my pic)


Once I saw how the bike would fit, Ibolted a $8 wheel chock to the deck:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=97145

I also screwed a couple of 2x4s on either side of the rear wheel.

I used 2" ratcheting straps, laced up under the fairingand around the fork mount. I hooked these to the front of the trailer, and ratcheted them evenly, keeping the bike level, and compressing the forks about half way.



At this point, the bike feels very stable.


Next, I added 1" straps (http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=47707) to give me redundant tiedowns, front and back.







In the last couple of pics, you can see where I kept the folding ramp, during the trip home.

I took these pictures after arriving home. The trip took me through thunderstorms with some serious winds. The trailer and straps had no problems.



The sacriest part wasn't the storms, it was riding onthe Pennsylvania roads that go on for miles with slight undulations. That would set up a situation where the bike and trailer bounced more than I cared for. The only answer was to constantly vary my speed over those sections. Seemed to keep the trailer from developing a rhythm.
 

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Anon wrote:
This seemed like a good thread to add my experience. I wanted to get this on the forum, for anyone doing a search.

I just bought a GW, and have never trailered a m/c before. The bike was 400 miles from home.

I already had a Harbor Freight 4'x8' flatbed trailer, with 3/4" plywood on top. This is a very useful trailer, at a decent price.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=90154

I drove down to Virginia with a stock of parts and hardware, because I wasn't quite sure how this would all go together.

To get the bike onto the trailer, I used this ramp (which can be found on sale for $60)
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=90018
(not my pic)


Once I saw how the bike would fit, Ibolted a $8 wheel chock to the deck:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=97145

I also screwed a couple of 2x4s on either side of the rear wheel.

I used 2" ratcheting straps, laced up under the fairingand around the fork mount. I hooked these to the front of the trailer, and ratcheted them evenly, keeping the bike level, and compressing the forks about half way.



At this point, the bike feels very stable.


Next, I added 1" straps (http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=47707) to give me redundant tiedowns, front and back.







In the last couple of pics, you can see where I kept the folding ramp, during the trip home.

I took these pictures after arriving home. The trip took me through thunderstorms with some serious winds. The trailer and straps had no problems.



The sacriest part wasn't the storms, it was riding onthe Pennsylvania roads that go on for miles with slight undulations. That would set up a situation where the bike and trailer bounced more than I cared for. The only answer was to constantly vary my speed over those sections. Seemed to keep the trailer from developing a rhythm.
Nice job! This is just what I was looking for.
 

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I pretty much secure bikes the same way though I don't like to use the handlebars as anchor points. It's too easy to damage them and you normally don't get a good angle off them for a tie down anyway.



BTW - When quoting a posting it's better if you delete the pictures or any non-germane part of the quoted post before sending it. Duplicating a bunch of pictures really slows things down for folks who have dial up modems. It also takes up a bunch of unnecessary space on the website server.
 

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exavid wrote:
... I don't like to use the handlebars as anchor points. It's too easy to damage them and you normally don't get a good angle off them for a tie down anyway.....
I agree, and should have pointed this out in my post.

My handlebar tiedowns were not pulled tight. The fork straps provided all the forward-and-down force I needed.

The handlebar straps were merely "snug", and only there for redundancy.

Same story in the back, one set to do the job, the other set ther in case of a strap failure.
 
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