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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2000 Aspy, & I just bought a Aspen camper trailer w/electric brakes. I know a lot of people says that you don't need brakes on a small trailer & for the most part I agree. I just wanted to have brakes on the trailer for those couple of times that I might need to do an E-Stop.

So does anybody have any experience with electric brake controller on a GW & what kind of controller did you have?:?
 

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I'd be a little worried having trailer brakes on a motorcycle. I wouldn't want them coming on or locking up when in a fast twisty road situation. Straight ahead on a clean road would be nice to then have trailer brakes. You would have to know the condition you are in every time you touch the brakes. Too much thinking when riding. Take them off and that will make the trailer lighter. juat my opinion of coarse. Tony:waving:
 

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I have pulled trailers for years behind my truck and gave some advice to a buddy who installed one when pulling his Combi Camp Camper with his 1500... What make and model controller did you buy??? Is it an inertial controller, ramp-up type or other type???

Les
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have pulled trailers for years behind my truck and gave some advice to a buddy who installed one when pulling his Combi Camp Camper with his 1500... What make and model controller did you buy??? Is it an inertial controller, ramp-up type or other type???

Les

I have not bought a controller yet. I'm new to this & trying to see what works on a bike. I stopped a different RV shop today & talked to the parts man & he didn't think putting a controller on a bike would be any different then on a car/truck. He said the big thing is to get it adjusted.

The controller he has is a pendulum style. It is a proven design & the model he has, has been around for about 12 years or so. I got the physical size of the controller & it looks like the best place to mount it would be in the trunk.
 

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After using Trailer Brake Controllers on 2 different vehicles
and one bike I'd suggest is the (old name and there are generics)
"Reese Panic Stop Brake Controller".
It has 3 adjustments.
1 More braking to vehicle/trailer.
2 Trailer brakes slow stop.
3 Trailer brakes fast stop. (panic stop)

It's a bit of a hassle to adjust for different loads but for me, it's a dream! Use it several times and you'll know where to put the sliders. Or masking tape near the sliders and reference mark your last load(s).
When I'm hauling the trailer, better than 50% of the time I let the trailer do ALL the braking.

I've done panic stops in sweeping turns... the bike will try to go straight since the trailer is, in effect, cloths-lining the bike. To me, it's nice knowing the trailer is helping you keep straight and upright. Slow turns is a different animal.... test test test.
. :action:
Floyd
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galaxyhunter... I see your just a stones toss away. If you're interested (and ride in the cold) maybe some cool-warm day you can try out my rig.
.
 

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I have not bought a controller yet. I'm new to this & trying to see what works on a bike. I stopped a different RV shop today & talked to the parts man & he didn't think putting a controller on a bike would be any different then on a car/truck. He said the big thing is to get it adjusted.

The controller he has is a pendulum style. It is a proven design & the model he has, has been around for about 12 years or so. I got the physical size of the controller & it looks like the best place to mount it would be in the trunk.
I would want the controller up front in easy reach like on top of the clutch master cylinder for easier adjustments while riding, lockup would not be a good ride, though adjusting for a quick stop will be a challenge on the bike, not like in a cage where it isn't as critical for both hands on.

Take FM up on that offer of testing his rig. :claps:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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galaxyhunter... I see your just a stones toss away. If you're interested (and ride in the cold) maybe some cool-warm day you can try out my rig.
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Floyd,

Thanks for that offer, I'll take you up on that. But it will most likely be in the early Spring.

In the mean time, I'm going to do some more research.
 

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I've never even thought about trailer brakes on a bike. It's an interesting concept to me. I doubt it's any harder to put on a bike than on a truck with the exception of running the wires and I can't imagine that it would be bad when going down the interstate or something strait like that. Couldn't say about the corners though, but I can say that it would probably take some getting used to. Thank you for giving me something to think about.
 

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I've never even thought about trailer brakes on a bike. It's an interesting concept to me. I doubt it's any harder to put on a bike than on a truck with the exception of running the wires and I can't imagine that it would be bad when going down the interstate or something strait like that. Couldn't say about the corners though, but I can say that it would probably take some getting used to. Thank you for giving me something to think about.
That's why we're all here.... to help each other out.
Steve had a GREAT concept a long time ago and look at what it's become
:) :action::)
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I would recommend you look at the Tekonsha Prodigy, P2 , or P3 controller... These are all inertial based controllers using accelerometer technology and are the most popular on the market today (I also Moderate the Travel Trailer and Hybrid Trailer Forums on RV.Net so I know what people are using)... The other real popular controller is called Max Brake and it is arguably the best controller out there as it is fully proportional, but requires you tapping into the hydraulic master cylinder on the tow vehicle... I don't believe anyone has done this on a Wing to date

The thing about a brake controller on a bike is you have to be very aware it's there... Too much braking force can quickly throw you off balance or disturb the stability of the bike... I'm not saying it's a bad idea, frankly, I think the idea has some merit, especially with a heavier trailer like a camper trailer...

If it were mine, I think I would set it up more as an assist, rather than a heavier braking effort... In RV,ing, we say the truck brakes stop the truck and the trailer brakes stop the trailer...But on a bike, I would still rely more on the bike brakes with a moderate assist from the trailer brakes... That way you would stand a better chance of maintaining control even in a panic stop situation...

The Tekonsha controllers mentioned above are all solid state utilizing accelerometer technology and also employ a technology called "boost"... The boost is a feature designed into the controller to immediately apply a certain percentage of trailer brake when the tow vehicle brake switch is activated... This "leading" of the tow vehicle brakes is required by certain anti sway hitches like the Hensley and ProPride which are 4 bar linkage hitches and employ camming action to prevent sway...

The boost feature my be advantageous on the bike - not sure - you would have to play with it a bit... Just start off slowly with the braking force on the TT brakes... Trailer brakes can be quite aggressive if set to near maximum so be careful when starting out with your adjustments...

Let us know how it works out for you...

Les
 

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Use a fully electronic brake controller, solid state. Tekonsha Prodigy, Voyager or any other brand, just buy a known name. These units can be installed in any direction or position.
Biggest thing is to adjust the brake to assist in stopping so the trailer does not pull the bike. It does take a bit of trial and is worth the task.
Depending on your bike and room to mount the brake controller, most newer bikes don't have spare room. Pick up watertight box, Wally world fishing/camping department. Then mount the electronic brake controller to the box frame of the trailer hitch inside of the watertight box.
You can use a round 6 pin wire connector to supply all the lights and brake controller. It doesn't matter where the controller gets mounted.

I recommend the following to all bikes towing a trailer with brakes.
Use some type of on/off switch to cut power to the trailer brakes when passing through towns at slow speed and when moving through parking lots, gas stations. Mount this switch in easy reach of the operator.

I've been pulling an Aspen Classic since 2003. At first pulled trailer without brakes for a couple of years. Then I put the brake controller on, I like the brakes.
 

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The one's I recommended are all fully electronic as is the Prodigy and Voyager and both of those utilize accelerometer technology...

Les
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well folks, I bought a Voyager controller. I mounted it in the right fairing pocket. A quick road test (before it started to rain) reduced a lot of fear of the trailer overpowering (by stopping) the bike. Right now I feel that the braking it about neutral, I don't feel the trailer trying to stop the bike, but I also can't feel the trailer trying to push me. I need to go out & drag the trailer a couple of hundred miles to seat the brake shoes, Then I can readjust everything & it should be good to go for a few thousand miles.:jumper:
I'd like to thank everybody for their input on this.:claps:
 

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