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I'm putting 4.80-8 6ply tires on my trailer. Maximum weight and pressure for these puppies are 745lb at 90psi.

The trailer weighs in at 125lbs, any ideas on what tire pressure I should run? I'm guesstimating about 23psi. Also any ideas what kind of mileage these things should get?

Kyle
 

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I run a chalk line across the threads then go for a run . Check the wear of the line if too much air only the middle will be wore out. When all the line is gone bingo the right amount is in. I run anywheres from 18 --- 22 lbs.

Dman
 

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 I tried that  chalk line trick... but my tire dealer said to run them slightly higher than that number   for effective wear ,and proper handling ..handling.. I tried them at 45psi  , and then at 35 psi... He is basing his wear ideas on very small boat trailers...   For me.. it handles very well at 35 psi... and I think that  actual tire "wear" is a moot point... most trailer tires wear out from  4 years in the sun (tiny cracks)... not from mileage  .... SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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30-35 psi always worked okay on my Cushman scooter with those tires, also used to have a little utility trailer that worked just fine at that pressure. I wouldn't go much higher on a bike trailer since it's a pretty light load on the wheels.
 

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Kyle wrote:
I'm putting 4.80-8 6ply tires on my trailer. Maximum weight and pressure for these puppies are 745lb at 90psi.

The trailer weighs in at 125lbs, any ideas on what tire pressure I should run? I'm guesstimating about 23psi. Also any ideas what kind of mileage these things should get?

Kyle
Kyle, enough tire pressure is required to keep the tires fairly round. The lower the pressure the more the side walls flex at speed & build heat. Tire heat isTHE big killer of both tire life & cause of sudden tire failure.

Probably 24-25 PSI cold would be a good starting point. Then, at every stop lay your hand on the tires & check for heat build up. If they are running fairly cool after a good long high speed run then try a little lower pressure. If they get hot (compare to your bike tires) then raise the pressure slightly. If at any time the trailer starts to hop in a soft tire vertical hop then raise the pressures slightly until that phenomenon goes away.

Twisty
 

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I must of missed something AZ........where'd ya go that your heading back to Yuma? Did the better half go too? By the way....not much rubber left on the trailer tires or the rear skin by the time I got home. I put new rubber on the 82 and waiting for the wrench to do the 96 as I don't have enough gumption to try it until I've seen it done. Think I'm going to ride the 82 for the rest of the season.

Kyle
 

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Kyle, changing the rear tire on the 1500 really isn't a bad job. I was a bit hesitant the first time I pulled the rear wheel off, but it's really a pretty easy chore.
 

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LOL Kyle! I was asking if you were putting new tires on the trailer so YOU and whatshername could head back down this way! :gunhead:

The weather has changed though. Monsoon season is here a little early this year. Right now (10 PM) it's only 93 degreesF. but a soggy 54% humidity. Actually, Canada sounds pretty good right now! :waving:

Bob :11grey:
 
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