Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Hi guys, I have a friend who needs some input on trailering his 1985 Aspencade and I thought someone here may have some info to share with him.

Here's the question he asked me;

I have acquired a trailer that has no suspension.Some people have told me that that is not only okay for the job of transporting the bike ,but even preferable to have suspension. I know one thing,--it sits lower than if it had springs.

The idea being that the bikes suspension can be made to take the impact of the road. You accomplish this by ratcheting the tie down straps to a degree where the shocks are about 1/2 compressed.
I beg your opinion in this matter and perhaps even further ,if you could ask it of the readership of the "Classic Wings" site. I need to feel secure that the bike will not be damaged in transit,and that my friend Dave who will be towing it will not be put to any undue delay,danger,or inconvenience because of my less than adequate trailer.
The trailer will be returning empty.

Vic
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

Run the trailer tires a little lower on air will help with lack of suspension. Only if they are the car sized 13-15" rim tires. And if you only compress the springs halfway, make sure you secure the hooks so that hitting a bump won't cause the straps to come off the bike or trailer when the bike dips down. I've many cases of loads becoming unsecured because of that.

Raymond
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
79 Posts
imported post

The Wing on the trailer won't be affected as it's own springs & shocks will take the load. The only problem I can foresee is the unsprung trailer hitting deep potholes and maybe flipping, then of course the Wing will be affected.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

Goldwinger1984 wrote:
Hi guys, I have a friend who needs some input on trailering his 1985 Aspencade and I thought someone here may have some info to share with him.

Here's the question he asked me;

I have acquired a trailer that has no suspension.Some people have told me that that is not only okay for the job of transporting the bike ,but even preferable to have suspension. I know one thing,--it sits lower than if it had springs.

The idea being that the bikes suspension can be made to take the impact of the road. You accomplish this by ratcheting the tie down straps to a degree where the shocks are about 1/2 compressed.
I beg your opinion in this matter and perhaps even further ,if you could ask it of the readership of the "Classic Wings" site. I need to feel secure that the bike will not be damaged in transit,and that my friend Dave who will be towing it will not be put to any undue delay,danger,or inconvenience because of my less than adequate trailer.
The trailer will be returning empty.

Vic
Vic, you are working with a lot of unsprung weight thereso will have poor rebound control but it should pull & work OK. I hauled a race car with a solid axle trailer for years & about the only difficulty I encountered was the chains & cinch straps working loose so be sure to check those often & don't use the cinch strap hooks but instead use the rings at the hook attachment& use an attachment that can't unhook itself as the bike squats on it's suspension as it encounters bumps.

Twisty
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,923 Posts
imported post

Biggest problem is the cinch hooks coming loose. I use electrical tie wraps, the high quality metal cinch models and secure the hooks with those. Other than that, take it easy and you will be fine.



My current trailer has suspension, but before that I used a hardtail for years.



I do not agree though with running the tire pressure low though because of the heat buildup. Guess it would depend on distance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
imported post

Take it slow.. I brought a GL1200 from Connecticut to Massachusetts a few years ago on an unsprung motorcycle trailer... I kept the tire pressure up and tied the bike down as solid as I could with straps. Purchased the straps at the local Home Depot in a 4-pack..

Absolutely no problems and had a lot of "lookers" along the way... :weightlifter:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,183 Posts
imported post

I had said running it a little low, as in maybe 5-10%. Like instead of 32 pounds, maybe 28. Not running it almost flat.... And only if the tires are big assed ones, not some rinky-dink 8" rimmed tires either. It's not gonna hurt nothing since the trailer and wing weigh less than 1000 pounds, and car sized tires are rated for 4 times that weight.

Raymond
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,923 Posts
imported post

I know where you're going Sam and don't mean to offend, just have my reservations about flexing the sidewalls that much intentionally.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

I don't think lowering the tire pressure a little on 15" or so tires with a light load. If I were experiencing any bouncing by the trailer that's the second thing I'd do after slowing down a bit. I do wonder how the trailer and it's wheels and axles hold up with no suspension and half a ton on top.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
299 Posts
imported post

When I haul bikes I take all the play out of the suspention, or the tie downs can work them selfs loose, But I've never done it on a trailer without suspention, So If you tie down the bike with the shocks half compressed it's going to move alot hitting bumps, I'd tie her down nice and tight and just take it easy,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

Goldwinger1984 wrote:
So, what's your opinion guys? Fully compress the suspension on the bike or strap down the unsprung portion of the bike very tight and let the bike absorb the shock?

Vic
Vic, you shouldn't ever fully compress a bikes suspension even on a trailer with a suspension. That is a sure way to bend a fork or sack out a spring. Just get it tight enough to keep the straps tight. Harley recommends that a bike be strapped down to 1/2 suspension travel for best results & least damage.

Twisty
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

That's the way I haul them in my truck, pull the bike down 1/3-1/2 the suspension range. Then check the straps a couple times in the first 100 miles to make sure everything's hanging together. Never cover the bike, the cover will damage the paint, always pad the straps if they touch the bike between their end points and make sure the free ends are secured so they won't be flogging anything.
 

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
imported post

I wonder if lowering the tire pressure on the bike would be of benefit since that would act as a bit of a cushion over the harder bumps? You have to remember that this bike will be on the unsuspended trailer for a trip that is more than halfway across Canada.

Any ideas on what weight/dimensions of straps I should recommend to the guy?

Vic
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

I use 1 1/4" straps with ratcheting tensioners. I wouldn't recommend lowering tire pressure because that's going to make things wiggle around more. ONe thing for sure don't use the rear crash bars for tie downs, they have been known to bend.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,491 Posts
imported post

Goldwinger1984 wrote:
I wonder if lowering the tire pressure on the bike would be of benefit since that would act as a bit of a cushion over the harder bumps? You have to remember that this bike will be on the unsuspended trailer for a trip that is more than halfway across Canada.

Any ideas on what weight/dimensions of straps I should recommend to the guy?

Vic
Vic, I'm not sure I would lower the bike's tire pressure as that could allow the tire side wall to collapse & allow the rims to contact the trailer's retention rails.

On the tie down straps I just use commercial ratchet straps with end hooks but use 2 double loop (no hooks or steel) short (24") straps over the lower triple clamps (up under the fairing) then hook the frontratchet strap hooks into the short strap loops (that keeps the ratchet straps hooks away from anything on the bike. (Never cinch a big bike down by the handlebars).. I also secure the rear of the bike with ratchet straps so the rear doesn't move sideways or bounce up & down on big bumps. If I feel like it I will sometimes add a safety set of straps from the tops of the front crash bars to the trailer to add additional restraint.

Twisty
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

Goldwinger1984 wrote:
Paul, you must be using a smaller strap for attachment to the bike, correct?

Vic
Yes, Twisty described the soft strap, it's a 24" long piece on soft nylon with eyes sewn in each end. I've also used rope sections to link to the straps.
 

·
Senior Guru
Joined
·
2,234 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
imported post

Thanks guys. I should have enough info to pass along to my friend so he can safely transport his 85 Wing across Canada without losing it, but, I will remind him about Murphy's law just in case he gets overconfident.

Vic
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,882 Posts
imported post

if you have an unsprung trailor (and even with a sprung trailor to some degree) the suspension of the wing will come to play.... as mentioned previously the cinch hooks may come undone, or wear and break... ALSO... as the bike suspension goes up and down the bike may WALK and start to lean in one direction
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top