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My budget will not allow for a full trike kit. From checking around I have found that a sidecar would be less expensive than, say a Voyager or tow pac or trigg. Is a sidecar as much fun to ride as the training wheel trike style. I personally like the looks of the training wheel rides but if sidecars are as stable and will go the speed limit on curves then I might go that way because of price.
 

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Side cars handle totally different than anything you have ever ridden. Stable? depends on how aggressive you ride. Take a right hand turn too fast and the rig can flip upside down. Take a left turn too fast and you'll swap ends. When accelerating, side cars tend to pull right and when de-accelerating or braking it "pushes" left. It takes lots of time and practice to ride a side car. But once you master a side car, they're a blast to ride. Oh, and if you value you your life, don't unexpectantly "fly the chair" with your wife in it. I had to learn that mistake from experience
 

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Welcome to the board, David!

Hard to say. There is a great deal of variability with sidecars. Factors such as the weight of the bike in relation to the weight of the car, the width of the car. etc. then there are the mounting parameters such as the lead of the car's wheel in relation to the bikes rear wheel, the trail of the front wheel in relation to the rake, the lean out/in of the bike in relation to the car etc. Then you get into the particulars of the camber of the road, the weight of the rider and the passenger, the presence or lack of ballast, fitment of a dynamic lean adjust...

A sidecar rig does not ride like a trike and verse visa. A trike is a 3-wheeled, three track symetric vehicle while a sidecar is 3-wheeled, 2-track asymetric machine. A sidecar will have different turning characteristics depending if you are turning "into" the car or "away from" the car.

But I will say that once you master a sidecar rig, you'll want to drive it every day! They are a blast for both rider and passenger. You can ride with your dog if you want! And, depending on your actual set up, you can ride 1-up, 2-up, 3-up and possibly 4-up! You get extra looks and extra waves. They make GREAT grocery getters! Be prepared to talk to strangers alot.
 

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You have not said why you want to go either. If you have some sort of disability for the reason, then that should be taken into consideration.
 

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Side car or training wheels, depends on the reason you are athinking about abandoning two wheels. Only you can make that decision.



I went to Voyager several years ago due to increasing disability and has not changed much at age 83. No regrets and Voyager has been OK 100%.



Several years ago wife and I, with camping trailer in tow and Voyager, riding 2-up, covered over 5200 miles going back to my childhood areas in Illinois. We had absolutely NO problem of any kind with the '89 GL1500, Voyager attached and pulling a camp trailer.



Not likely I will do it ever again at my age and with hip replacement ahead sometime this fall, Voyager will make it possible to keep riding.



I have no sidecar experience info on others messages is worth considering.



Whatever your choice, ride, enjoy, hit the road as often as you can.



Polkwing

Oregon
 

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i like the sidecar ,gas mileage sucks, you wont go fast in turns,but it keeps you and your wife riding!:waving:
 

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The things I like best about the sidecar vs the trike idea is the wheel tracks avoid the center lane oil and debris path and you gain a large seat and storage that just about washes out with the trike (or quike) vs bike approach.
 

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I have a friend that added a sidecar because of a balance problem....he loves it and it looks really cool...I have another friend that bought a Trike because he's not confortable on two wheels......It looks cool too, and he loves it.......getting old sucks, but it shouldn't affect your pleasures of riding..If you don't think you can do a trike, then I think you would be happy with a side car,,,,,,,,,,,like I said, they are really cool.......I'm also thinkling of one someday..
 

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David -- Depending on your thinking here ---

A 1500 with the hydraulic landing gear just came up on my "local market radar" - I've not investigated it much, since I'm not in the market.

Perhaps we could set you up into this 2-wheel training wheel solution as your primary ride and sell-off what you've got now ?? (again, I've not researched this too deeply, but I imagine that the add-on hydraulics could be moved, though I'm not certain about the residual value of the bike or wheel-set.)

PM me if I should look at this more deeply, I'll gladly help out. You're not so far away that I won't be in your neighborhood sometime this year ! (I'm guessing that this "option" to swap parts onto your current ride could be done at ~$2.5k if we do the labor)...
 

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Wingman. Thanks for the reply. My wife already made it clear that she would not ride in the sidecar, only on the back. The reason I need more wheels is because I'm a para(incomplete). I wonder if the lack of lower body strength will affect the body language needed to maneuver a sidecar setup. The car would sure make it easier to find a place for my chair.
 

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Thanks Old School. I'm a 60 year old para who rode for years on 2 wheels until my accident in "85". I had some fly by night mechanics hook up a cheap after market side hack. That was in Phoenix. After I moved to Colorado I was not happy with it on these curvy mountain roads. I welded a rear end off an old servi-car onto the rear of my rigid frame Harley. That wasn't the smoothest of jobs either but I liked it better than the sidehack. I'm almost positive that the car rig up was why I wasn't happy with it. My question now is, does a sidecar require a lot of lower body english to manuver(not sure how to spell that word)? I chose the Goldwing because I think the extra comfort level will be much appreciated.Thanks again---Dave
 

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Good point SpiderBob. I rode for years on 2 wheels until an auto accident in"85". I'm now a para(incomplete) and I'm wondering if the lack of lower body strength would limit my ability to "wing" a chair or whatever else is needed to safely operate one. I had limited time on both a sidecar and a trike. The sidecar rigging I had was really a rinky dink affair and I'm sure that's why I wasn't happy with it. I had very few miles on either one so lay no claim to experience. It's been 20 years since I've ridden anything other than a ATV.
 

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Normally, I would push a sidecar over a trike. I have owned both but won't buy another trike.
A red flag popped up when you said the wife won't ride in the sidecar.
The sidecar, when going down the road, needs to weigh at least 1/3 that of the motorcycle. Depending on how heavy you and the Mrs. are, that means you may have to add a great deal of weight to the sidecar to make it stable. If you go lighter, you will have trouble cornering, especially in those OMG moments when a deer runs out and you need to swerve.
When you ride on two wheels, you countersteer. Push on the left handlebar and you turn left, push right to turn right. On a sidecar or trike, push the left grip and you turn right. Now imagine a deer or dog or kid runs out from the left. You turn the handlebars hard to the right and the sidecar comes off the ground. Once that happens, pushing right causes you to turn left into oncoming traffic or hazard.
On the other hand, if you know anyone with a sidecar, get them to give your wife a ride. I'm guessing she will change her mind.
I have a Goldwing with a sidecar and one without. The two wheeler doesn't get more than 20 miles from home. The sidecar bike is just so much more fun.
 

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David H. wrote:
Wingman. Thanks for the reply. My wife already made it clear that she would not ride in the sidecar, only on the back. The reason I need more wheels is because I'm a para(incomplete). I wonder if the lack of lower body strength will affect the body language needed to maneuver a sidecar setup. The car would sure make it easier to find a place for my chair.
No body english required with a goldwing unless you get a sidecar too small for the bike. Stick to a heavy car and you will be fine.
 

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David I have a Voyager & I love it as for your having a space for your chair, on the Voyager that would depend on what style of chair you have. If you have one of those newer sport chairs, you could easily set up a bracke to set your chair between the sadle box & Voyager fender. there is about 6" of space there. Angela



I'm sorry I thought these pics whould show the space better.:sadguy: David do you have any mobility @ all, as you could also mount a chair rack to the rear frame of the Voyager see above for the pic of the uncovered frame. It sticks out about 10".:waving::waving:
 

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Okay I don'tt want to pry but you already have a 1500?
I would think the best way for you to go would be to get a sidecarrig or a trike already done

Wilf
 
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