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Hello, I am in need of some information to help us decide on the purchase of a 1989 gold wing, don't know the model at this time. However, I have been told by the previous owner (my father) that the last year he road the bike, (2001) it developed a problem: when the temperature outdoors exceedes 85 degrees the bike will stall. He had to wait about 1/2 hour then it would start up. I don'tknow any more particulars than that and unfortunately, his memory isn't too good to provide more details.He has been through a number of exercises and has not been able to determine the problem. I wondered if anyone else has ran into this and what the problem was. Your help would be greatly appreciated as we are very eager make a decision on this bike. Thanks ahead of time.
 

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off the top of my head, i would definetly check the water pump. On my 77, my temp gauge was not working, my water pump quit working and it quit running when it got hot. Just something you could easily check.
 

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Could be vapor-lock. Check the routing of the fuel line and filter. If the fuel gets too hot it can vaporize in the line and/or filter, starving the carbs of liquid fuel. Sometimes it's as simple as re-routing the line or insulating it from engine heat.
 

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Marco has a good point. Also it could be the fuel cap being faulty. In hot weather teh fuel will vaporize faster and a bad cap won't allow it to vent fast enough. If it happens again, open teh fuel cap and see if the bike starts then. :waving:
 

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Thanks for your suggestions. We looked at the bike yesterday and the current owner (brother in law) says he had to recently replace the selenoid, and has riden the bike in 90+ degrees with no problems. He suggests it has been corrected. Does this sound reasonable? I would also like to ask for opinions on starting outa new rider on a wing. You are all familiar with the bike, is it a mistake tostart on such a big bike? This will be my husbands first bike, he is a big guy, he can handle it NO PROBLEM, but there seems to be some conversation that a rookie should not be on such a bike. Any comments would be appreciated.
 

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de wrote:
Thanks for your suggestions. We looked at the bike yesterday and the current owner (brother in law) says he had to recently replace the selenoid, and has riden the bike in 90+ degrees with no problems. He suggests it has been corrected. Does this sound reasonable? I would also like to ask for opinions on starting outa new rider on a wing. You are all familiar with the bike, is it a mistake tostart on such a big bike? This will be my husbands first bike, he is a big guy, he can handle it NO PROBLEM, but there seems to be some conversation that a rookie should not be on such a bike. Any comments would be appreciated.
I wouldn't recommend a Goldwing as a first bike. It's not so much a person's size, but the fact that the inevitable errors in the early learning curve are a lot less damaging to persona and machine if you start out on something smaller. If you can afford it, buy the Goldwing and park it in the garage while getting some time learning on a 500-750cc street bike. This is bike large enough to handle the largest rider, powerful enough to get into trouble and much less costly to repair. I'd look for one that was far from pristine but ran okay. Once you had a few months on that transfer to the 'Wing and sell the smaller bike. I had owned and ridden quite a few bikes many thousands of miles prior to getting back to motorcycling after some years away and I will say the Goldwing was quite intimidating for the first couple months. It felt like a tank, was downright scary in a crowded parking lot, and trying a U-turn in a normal street width was just about impossible. Six months and 6000 miles later we were on good terms and now I don't notice the size of the brute. I sure would not have wanted to learn to ride on such a big bike!
 

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I second that. I've been off bikes several years after riding most all my life. This wing is BIG and doesn't handle as you might expect. On the highway no problem, in town...problem. It takes some getting use to. Having said that, I would sure hate to be riding anything else now. It took me several weeks to get "good enough" to get my wife on board.
 

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de, welcome to the forum! :waving:

As to your question about the solenoid, yes that could have been the problem.

As for getting a wing as your first bike, you have already gotten good advice! If your husband has ANY experience on motorcycles it would really help. If he has a natural ability for riding he can probably learn to ride a wing safely with some practice, a lot of practice. These bikes are terribly heavy and have a tremendous amount of power to go along with the weight. It takes practice to learn how to handle both. On the highway it's a breeze, until you need to stop quickly or make sudden moves. in the city it can be areal effortjust keeping it upright. If he buys it, make him practice around the neighborhood a few hundred times before going out on the highway, and then practice some more. Once his ability and confidence come up, have him practice some more since this is when he will most likely be surprised by something unexpected due to his concentration drifting over to how much he enjoys riding!

After that, it's all fun but you can never give up the focus of what you are doing and more importantly, what thetraffic around you is doing!



Bob :11grey:
 

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Hi De. Hi de hi de ho. Ho ho.. Okay, I digress.:cheeky1:

These guys are giving you good advice about the wing being a bit more difficult to handle. I bought my '83 a year ago after a 20 year absence from riding and initially I thought I'd made a big mistake. The weight factor alone was much more than I'd experienced and I wasn't comfortable for quite a while. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't take my wife for a ride for a couple of months(even thoughwe dated on my 750 some 30 years ago)until I started to feel comfortable. Thank goodness she understood. But, after getting used to the sheer mass of the bike, I have gradually got to the point where I can handle the bike like a sport bike. I can turn around on a two lane road without putting my feet down. I can ride in first at idle and not get wobbly. That being said, experience with a much smaller bike is very beneficial to getting to that point. I'm a big guy(280lbs, 5'11'') and occasionally when I get to the point where I'm ready to stop, the bike still will mess with me. I call it a "controlled crash":goofygrin:

I wouldn't want anyone to start out with a Wing if they don't have previous riding experience. The joys of riding can quickly be nulled out if you aren't used to the sheer mass of the bike and it gets away from you. I can speak from recent experience that if you fall over, getting back up can literally be a pain.

So, maybe buy the bike, put it in the garage and buy a 250-500 size and ride the heck out of it. Take some safety courses, get someone to give you pointers and take it easy. Most important of all, don't get in a hurry. You've got the rest of your life to enjoy on your bike if you learn the right way from the beginning. Do it wrong and it might be over before you know it.

Also, like AZ said, watch out for the stupid a**** in their cars because they sure the hell won't be watching you.:whip::bash:

Regards,

Hobie
 

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Thanks to everyone, we appreciate the insight. Looks like it may be a bit more bike than he can handle to start with. But that was what we needed to know. Thanks again.
 

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Your definatly getting some good advice. I've been riding actively for years and when I first got my wing it was alittle spooky. My biggest thing still to this date is having to retrain my brain about the linked brakes. The wing is the only bike I have that requires a heavy foot on the rear brake because of the linked braking system. All my other bikes have such strong front brakes I hardly touch the rears at all. But most importantly, I really do finding myself riding the wing the most even though it's the oldest bike in the garage. Have fun! Keep the shiny side up!
 

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gkiesel wrote:
But most importantly, I really do finding myself riding the wing the most even though it's the oldest bike in the garage. Have fun! Keep the shiny side up!
I hope this isn't indicative of increasing fogeydom!:goofygrin:
 

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I got back onto a GL1500 after a ten year break - Looking back i should have gone for some training before i got on it.  The journey from the dealers to home was 250 miles and if i am honest it was a journey that i should never have made - if  you want all the gorey details of that and i trip we did to spain have a look here http://www.bromley.me.uk and down load the Elite-Wings Euro Tour 2004 file (if you are interested the last file is a report on the wonderful time we had in Ireland recently - they are on the big size as they had to be edited by a couple of other for a web page).  It is a write up of the trip I did with a great bunch of folks to Spain - from when I picked the 1500 to the trip on an 1800.  How I did not come off the bike or do myself a mischief (or anyone else come to that) i do not know.Get some training in and then get on the wing - it is worth the wait trust me                                     Rgds                                                                                                                                         Phil
 

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Exavid, As in Carl Fogerty the racer. YOU BET! thanks.
 
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