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My bike is a 1994 GL1500SE.

Tonight I spent some time changing my speedometer cable. Before I started I spent two evenings reading every thread I could find on replacing the cable and decided that I would use the method where you remove the plastic filler and plastic housing around the ignition and turn the handlebars full left.

My hands are pretty big but I decided to give this a try. The threads I read all spoke about having to bend your hand to contortions in order to be able to loosen the nut where the cable attaches to the speedometer.

It was attempting this process and while attaching the new OEM cable that I stumbled onto two things that worked very well for me.

Let me begin by saying I am left handed as that plays a part later on.

I removed the plastic and turned the handlebars full left as suggested. I could get my hand up in and followed the cable to the locking nut at the speedometer. Try as I might I just couldn’t get enough of a finger grip to break the nut loose. After about one hour and a few choice words I decided to walk away for a bit and to come back later.

I mentioned I am left handed. When I returned to the bike I went to the right side and reached up under the dash with my left hand, palm side up. To my surprise my fingers found the nut with little difficulty. My thumb had to push the bundle of wires out of the way but I was able to get enough grip on the nut that I could break it free without difficulty. Using my left hand, palm side up, from the right side of the bike made a huge difference for me.

After installing the new OEM cable it was time to reattach the cable to the nut. Using the same hand position I easily found the nut but try as I might I just couldn’t get things to line up right to get the thread started.

Long story short, instead of trying to spin the nut onto the stem by hand, I used the shrink tubing that butts up against the nut as a driver. This spins reasonably freely and flexes with the cable housing. It also allowed me to keep my hand quite a bit lower and then spin the nut by using the tubing. It didn’t take long to get things started as long as I kept pressure against the nut with the tubing.

Once the nut was started I hand tightened it the same way I removed it.

I hope I explained this well. This was my first time doing the job and I learned a lot from it. Hopefully this may help someone else.
 

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I did mine (actually thorough lube up) when I pulled the dash cluster for the LED light bulb changeover. Made it very easy to get that nut off, but of course had to remove more stuff.
Nice post!

I have a selection of Blue Knight shirts from rides over the past few years. Sweet.
 

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Here's a slick way of doing it.

-What does not work well: (can take hours)
Attach cable/housing at bottom, route upwards, then try to align and attach it to the threaded boss... very difficult to get the alignment right!

-What Does work: (takes 5 minutes)
Route cable/housing at bottom (leave disconnected), route upwards pulling about 1ft of slack to the top to form a U-shape between the last cable guide and the threaded boss... the cable/housing may now be Easily Aligned to the threaded boss via Gravity... Once attached at the top, then pull the slack back down to the botttom and attach, Voila!
 
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