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For those with 1500s from 1988 and 1989, you're already aware of some of the differences in the rear wheel:

* Final drive flange has 6-drive pins that fit into wheel
* Bushings for the drive pins (in wheel) are not replaceable
* Rotor diameter increased for '90+ bikes (296mm diameter,increased to a 316mm)
* Pricing for rotors for the '88-'89 bikesis usually more expensive (limited demand)
* Tire / wheel diameters and mounting are the same (early /v/ late production)
* The "open" side of the spokes switchessides for'90+

Some of "my thoughts" on the rear wheel differences:

* I see the rotor costs and non-replaceable drive bushings as two major drawbacks to the '88-'89 (early) design.

* The replaceable drive bushings in the later wheels isan attractive plus, as the bushings do wear (even though replacements can be cast into the early wheels as a DIY, it's just easier to buy new and know what you're getting)

* All things being equal, larger diameter rotors offer increased braking

* I really don't care where the "open side of a wheel spoke is

* Long-term serviceability and availability of parts should be better for a wheel that ended production in 2000 when compared to a wheel that ended production in 1989



Why am I posting this? Mostly because someone PM'd me and asked me to. Also, to let folks know that swapping the '90-up rear wheel into the early production bikes is 100% doable at your next tire change with little additional effort.



What you will need for the swap:
* Your 1988 or 1989 GL1500 Goldwing
* A newer wheel (this MUST include the bearing spacer found between the wheel bearings) **see Notes at bottom**
*Agood condition '90+ rear brake rotor and mounting bolts (if not already fixed to the new wheel)
* A GOOD drive fange for the newer wheel (5-pin)
* A rear caliper bracket from '90+
* The plastic Dust Gaurd froma '90+ final drive unit (Blackplastic ring fastened to the final drive with a single bolt)

What you do:
* Remove the old wheel and drive flange as wouldbe done for a normal tire change
*Remove the one-bolt holding the dust shield to your final drive - twist to remove the dust shield and replace with the newermodels' dust shield
* Replace with new wheel, rotor, and drive flange (usual advice here -- 60% Moly on the drive splines and NO-Grease on the 5-pins of thedrive flange)
* Use the new Brake Caliper mounting bracket in lieu of the older part (remember to install the pad retainer shim)
* Follow installation processandtorque specs for your bike.

Optional stuff:
* Always a good time to refresh wheel bearings if you're uncertain
* Brake Pad replacement makes sense, the pads you have won't be worn to match the different rotor. OEM pads should bematched to your bike's production year, aftermarket pads mostly fit '88-2000
* Why not replace the rotor with a new one now that they're cheaper? :p
* This is a good time to change the rear brake line (steel over teflon?) -- your early line will fit and unction, but if you're replacing with new, get a line for the later years
* Bleeding rear brakes is easier while you're servicing the tire/wheel and have easy access to the caliper
* Clean and re-lube your caliper -- it's in your hand, why not?
* see **Notes** at bottom of this post

Like always, ifyou change pads or rotors plan on moderate and "prudent" driving while you bed the brakes (compounds and manufacturers vary on bedding time). if you replaced bot pads AND rotors, plan on riding conservatively twice as long (bedding new-to-new can take some time)

Once bedded-in, your rear braking should improve from what you had prior to the swap. Your front-to-rear braking bias on the linked system will be altered slightly, so practice a few short/panic stopping maneuvers safely outta traffic to get a good feel (brakes should be bedded prior to aggressive heating).

Use caution and ride-on knowing that you've got additional parts availability for your older 1500... recheck torques and fasteners as you would with any wheel-removal.


**NOTES**

* There's a thin "gasket-like"thrust washer that started being used in '98thatfits between the wheel and the drive flange (42616-MAJ-G20) -- This covers the drive-side wheel bearing and helps toattenuate noises caused by the "sideways" motion (in/out of the final drive) of the drive flange itself. It's been my experience that this can help to reducethe vibration found while feathering throttle fond on many bikes (also onhigh-speed decel for several folks)

* I have not verified that the wheel's bearing spacers can be swapped across years - I see no logical reason that theycouldnot be swapped; it's just something that I did not verify

* If you pull a trailer with your '88-'89, this is one of my favorite updates, but PLEASEafteryour brakes bed, retrain yourself to the bike first, then re-retrainyourself with your trailer on.

* Added/Edited in the bits about the Plastic Dust Shield on the Final Drive (Wingnumberone )









(always forgetting something:()
 

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Good info satan, maybe the mods can put this where it will be kept for posterity.
 

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FYI -

The diff to wheel bearing spacers are the same length - the earlier ones are a machined piece, the later wheels use alength of tubing, with one end flared. Same overalllength, though. (I did this swap, andmeasuredbothfor a guy awhile back, on here)A search should pull up the actual number - if you care.

The plastic ring that fills the annular space between the diff and hub is different as well. The diameter and contour of the diff-side hub"lip" on the wheel changed. If you are sourcing a later wheel for the swap - get the plastic ring with it.
 

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Wingnumberone wrote:
FYI -

The diff to wheel bearing spacers are the same length - the earlier ones are a machined piece, the later wheels use alength of tubing, with one end flared. Same overalllength, though. (I did this swap, andmeasuredbothfor a guy awhile back, on here)A search should pull up the actual number - if you care.

The plastic ring that fills the annular space between the diff and hub is different as well. The diameter and contour of the diff-side hub"lip" on the wheel changed. If you are sourcing a later wheel for the swap - get the plastic ring with it.
:bow:Thanks for the reminder on the Final Drive Dust Shield, Wingnumberone.





:sadguy: It's actually kinda funny that I omitted that bit -- When recenlty updating my '88 (on it's tire change) - everything was ready to go when I discovered that all 5 of the final drives that I had on hand were from the early years-- so I had to stop and search for that very same Dust Shield -- Goes to figure that I'd forget to include that on the shopping list an installation ...



I edited the shield references into that first post, so that someone doesn't run into the same trouble that I caused myself :p (now where were you when I talked the swap through at breakfast ??? )
 

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I happen to have an early model ('88 or '89) spare rear wheel. It currently has a new car tire installed. My GL1500 is a '91, and this wheel is no good to me. I want to keep the car tire, but would like to part with the wheel - it's in great shape, complete with drive flange and brake rotor, both in very good shape. I paid $100 for it & I'm just looking to get my money back... or swap for the newer wheel assy. PM me if interested.
 

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I have done the same thing to my bike. I have an 89 wing and the rear wheel assembly is from a 94. I swapped the caliper holder and caliper from the 94 as well as the dust shield .. I was lucky enough to have found an unused swing arm, drive shaft and rear diff that was on a 2000 model. The guy triked his out when he first got the bike and had this just laying around. I have updated the entire rear end of the bike. I do have one question and that is .... Why NOT lube the 5 drive pins???
 

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What for sure is correct?

Lube the older wheels pins, or the newer wheels drive pins?

I have an 88.
I lubed my pins with molly 60 when I changed tires, then I was told in a post I should not have lubed my pins?
Been worried about this for about 4K miles now.
 

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Chromo ....It's the 88/89 modelswhich have the 6 pin drivenflange,that require grease applied to their pins.

It's the 5 pin driven flange found on 90-00 models that you don't grease the pins
 

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Satan,

Thanks for a great write up.

As we talked before, I plan to usemy 88 rotor and brakes (depending) on my 93 wheel.

Did you attempt to assemble the later wheel with the early rotor? I think there was someone here that put the late rotor on an early wheel and used the later caliper mount, so if that is true I should be able to do what I was planning. I would use the newer brake on the rear IF I could find out if the valving is the same as the early bikes (front/rear bias) and Honda did it to slightly improve the rear bite.

I have everything from the swing arm out, less the driveshaft.


Bill
 

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77Pinto wrote:
...
Did you attempt to assemble the later wheel with the early rotor? ...
Generally speaking, if the rotor and caliper bracket are of the same vintage you'll be fine.



To run the newer wheel on the older bike without the brake change - you can fit the older rotor to the new wheel (no issues - use rotor bolts from either wheel) -- The newer wheel will require the use of the newer dust shield and drive flange for the final drive.



Yep can/has been done!
 

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If you can install an older ('88 or '89) smaller brake rotor on a '90 or newer wheel assy, will the newer/larger brake rotor fit on the older wheel? I took a quick look last time I had my wheel off and compared the two and I didn't think the mounting flanges were the same. Anyone done this - newer/larger rotor on '88/'89 rear wheel.
 

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Yep - the rotors can swap... easy upgrade for the '88-'89 is to use the OEM wheel and update BOTH the rotor and caliper mount. --
 

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Now I just need to find out if the bias is the same between the front and rear on the 88/89 and the later ones.

Like I mentioned, if all they did was make the rotor larger (giving a little more bias to the rear) I might swap to the newer, but if they also made more bias to the front with valving when they made the rotor larger (effectively keeping it the same ratio) I might not do it.

Thanks again,
Bill
 

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Thnx Satan - I guess I'll try to find a decent deal on a '90 or newer rotor. Cost me $60 to get that car tire installed on that spare rim... would like to keep it on there if able, and still have OEM rim to fall back on.
 

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77Pinto, That was Satan that did the great right up here, not me LOL

Thanks Dusty, I thought I was right about greasing my 88 pins, but been worried since I was told I was wrong later.

Daryl, maybe get a good set of spoons and some rim protectors and try doing the tire yourself next time if you can.
Not all that hard really, and lots of ways to make a cheap easy bead breaker, or some say use C clamps.
I have an HF changer to break my beads with, but then it's off to the spoons for removing and mounting.
More you do the easier they seem to get also.
 

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Chromo wrote:
77Pinto, That was Satan that did the great right up here, not me LOL....
Sorry about that, I fixed it. I rarely ever give Satan credit for anything.....





Bill
 

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pwhoever wrote:
Daryl Martel wrote:
...Cost me $60 to get that car tire installed on that spare rim...

Ouch!!!
Oh yeah. Minimum here for a tire change is $50 at most shops. Shop rate here at most garages & shops is $80 to $110 an hour. The place I brought it to (a Suzuki dealer) did it right away & while I waited... well worth the extra $10 compared to coming back for it (probably 20 mile round trip). I do as much as I can myself... yes, I want to buy some quality spoons and learn how to do my own tire changes.
 

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Never before noticed this thread but today it was linked in another thread....
Now I just need to find out if the bias is the same between the front and rear on the 88/89 and the later ones.

Like I mentioned, if all they did was make the rotor larger (giving a little more bias to the rear) I might swap to the newer, but if they also made more bias to the front with valving when they made the rotor larger (effectively keeping it the same ratio) I might not do it.
.... as to above I'ld say that you actually fine tune any bias with your hand operation of the front brake lever.
If you use just the rear brake pedal, either way (88/89 or later larger rear rotor ... and on my '85 1200) ... you can lock the rear wheel alone before the front.
 
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