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Hey,

ihave a 88 1500, factory stereo/cassete. i bought a cd/mp3 player, and cassette adapter, but when i try using it, the cassette keeps flipping one side to the other (auto reverse i guess?)every 5 seconds, so i cant listen to my music. anyone have this problem? is there a way to turn off the auto reverse feature? or you think its the cassette adapter i bought ( bought a monster adapter)?

thanks...
 

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Hey,

Some adapters just do this. I used a Sanyo one that wasn't cheap and it kept activating the flipper. Then I got a cheapo one in Argos and it worked perfectly. Just one of those things. :baffled:
 

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I have a tape cassette with a wire that plugs into my iPod. I found it at Walmart for $10.
I don't have any problems with the auto reverse on my '85 1200A, but the head on the tape doesn't always align with the tape player head good, resulting in some soung quality loss.

That should read: sound quality loss.
 

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On my '94 1500 SE there is a factory optional accessory audio plug in the faring just under the left pocket.

I realize that the this option would not work for those that have the type CD playersthat works through the Cassette players.

Removing the soft snap on cover and 4 screws and it is suppose to be easily found.

I don't know if the other models have that option audioplug or not.
 

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Some cassette adapters have only the audio coupling head and do not simulate the cassette reels actually turning in the player. Most cassette tape players have an opto-coupler under the take-up reel that tells it when the tape is finished on that side (or if there are take-up problems). When it does not sense the reel is turning anymore it reverses directions. The better grade adapters have internal gears that turn off of the capstan and simulate a casette tape playing, not just couple the audio. A word of warning, all the adapters do tend to be more difficult on the cassette decks than a regular tape because they are usually left in longer and will eventually cause your belts to stretch. You might want to check into a FM Modulator instead of the tape adapter. Good luck.

-Mark
 

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Rally, you sound like you know what you're talking about. I was asking around about MP3 playersand if you could get them to play through your radio, nobody I talked to seemed to think that you could. I remember when mobile CD players and stackersfirst made an appearancethat theywould receive through RF. Is this what you mean by FM modulator and if so where would I look for such an animal?

Thanks

RR
 

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RR

An Fm Modulator plugs into the headset (or audio output) jack on any audio device that uses a 1/8" stereo output jack. It converts the audio signal to a commercial FM frequency that you can tune on any FM receiver. They are available from Circuit City, Best Buy or pretty much any retail audio dealer. You should be able to go to an on-line site for the major dealers and find them. The only drawback to FM modulators is channel overcrowding in major cities may cause FM capture (bleed over) from nearby stations. A good modulator has a built in antenna switch that will turn off your external antenna when you are using an audio input. Blessings!

-Mark
 

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