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This is the one off my bike it had the occasional run-on problem "I think?" But I do not see any real problem??



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well it does look ok, but what you cant see sometimes is the coil going bad.
 

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I ordered one off ebay from a Canada Suppler Mainly because my local dealer is such a Jerk I will almost do anything to stay out of that shop. After seeing the inside of the relay I now do not think it is the relay?? Any comments would be helpful.
 

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your starter relay seems to be in good shape but may be dry causing it to stick,

when the solenoid sticks, no matter if the key is on or off.

If it is stuck and you turn the key to off and it releases (starter stops) then you have a problem with your wiring. probably a short somewhere.
 

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Large currents of DC as in starting a starter motor are very difficult to control! And the reasons are:

DC wants to continue until is dies of its own energy
It simply is difficult to shut DC off.
Right from the start of a flow of current the voltage drops
DC currents produce a big field effect or a magnetic energy field around the wire or cable
The effect of this field is to magnetize every material near by especially steel.
Magnets then attract steel.

Because of all this everything near by is affected by these large currents including the motor, that is used to start the engine and the cables carrying the current and the solenoid used to initiate the DC motor.

Solenoid

The solenoid from the great pictures shown is a wire coil, two metal faces that becomes a magnetic pole either North or South used to attract and hold the solenoid and friction areas to guide the moving armature and keep things all together so the in, out, up or down movement can work.

But over time dirt, dust, metal fragments get stuck to the solenoid in every spot but anything made of steel gets very dirty from magnetism. The dirt builds up and road vibration causes it to flop and fall into the moving parts and sticking happens.

Sticking can also happen from a badly designed solenoid.

Every so often you will have to remove and clean the solenoid, but...

The DC currents need a big area of conduction. At least 100 A worth of conduction material. That means a lot of copper. A good solenoid uses a lot of copper. A better solenoid uses copper with silver coating and the best use copper with gold.

Silver and gold are expensive so many good solenoids are just large copper solenoids, but to cut costs the copper areas are smaller.

Currents when they stop or start create voltage and that voltage could go higher than the 12 V from the battery and when starting and stopping currents with larger voltage the copper wears out. It pits, it tarnishes, the more it pits and tarnishes the worse a current carrier it becomes. As it wears the act of making and breaking a contact becomes bad and add the current and voltage to a bad contact the heat builds up and the temperature is hot enough to melt copper and when the contacts slam together with 100 A at 12-15 + volts plus the added field effect of a badly worn surfaces, welding of the faces takes place or at least sticking from dirt or magnetic crap and you get the starter motor running even though the push button or the key is off.

At this time the solenoid is now done.

Yes you can do a temporary fix by prying the welded contacts apart, but smoothing and polishing the contacts to work properly is not easy and with a welded over heated copper substrate, replace the solenoid.

The best thing in replacing the solenoid is buying a good quality solenoid. A solenoid with large copper areas of contact or with silver or gold contacts. Anti arcing contacts. In automotive a hard thing to find, but industrial electrics as in welding, drive motors DC anti arcing contactors are available. If a smaller device can fit the bike its a great choice for a starter solenoid.

Even some Ford fender mount solenoids can be used.

It comes down to when you need it, how much money and how long you are going to keep that bike.
 

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If, when it acts up (too late for you now) and you smack it with a 2x2 and it stops spinning the starter, you know it's the relay.
 

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The starter button actually sticks quite often on the 1500. Pull on it when you get the starter run-on.
 

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Nice pics. onevw , as you can see by the discoloration inside the canister , there is a lot of heat generated in these high amp. switches.
A common problem is the cylindrical pintel getting stuck in the coil hole and not releasing . Have seen this effect with commercial contactors and when they go bad , they just go bad even though there is no discernable jamming or reason for it.
Be sure your start button is not sticking on also.
 
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